SFI and ASU to offer online M.S. in Complexity | Complexity Explorer

SFI and ASU to offer online M.S. in Complexity (Complexity Explorer)
SFI and Arizona State University soon will offer the world’s first comprehensive online master’s degree in complexity science. It will be the Institute’s first graduate degree program, a vision that dates to SFI’s founding. “With technology, a growing recognition of the value of online education, widespread acceptance of complexity science, and in partnership with ASU, we are now able to offer the world a degree in the field we helped invent,” says SFI President David Krakauer, “and it will be taught by the very people who built it into a legitimate domain of scholarship.”
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👓 Scripting News: August 17, 2017

Scripting News: August 17, 2017 by Dave Winer (Scripting News)
Another shift happened a few years ago, when I decided it was okay to develop just for myself, with no intention of ever releasing the stuff I was working on. That led to a new style of product, and a happier developer. I was always doing it for myself, and fooling myself into believing it was for other people. I'm no less a narcissist than anyone else. Once you own that, you get a lot more powerful, I have found.

A great advertisement for selfdogfooding.

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🎞 Arlington Road (Screen Gems, 1999)

Arlington Road from Screen Gems
A gripping thriller about a college professor who begins to suspect that his all-American neighborsmight be terrorists. Or is he just paranoid? An edge-of-your-seat journey that reveals how little we really know about the world around us. Director Mark Pellington Starring: Jeff Bridges, Tim Robbins with Joan Cusack, Hope Davis, Robert Gossett, Mason Gamble

I remember seeing a rough cut screening of this prior to release and loving it. It still holds up incredibly well today, and even has an interesting resonance in our current political climate with the alt-right and domestic terrorists seemingly more scary today than foreign ones.

This had a fantastic screenplay by Ehren Kruger which was brought to life by Mark Pellington with a fantastic cast.

While made on the cusp of the rise of the web there is a short segment where Jeff Bridges’ character does some basic internet stalking before jumping into microfiche stalking. The technology differences aren’t really terribly jarring and actually add to the plot in interesting ways.

Definitely a must see and worth re-watching again if you haven’t seen it recently.

👓 Weniger Social Media, mehr Mensch by René Meister

Weniger Social Media, mehr Mensch by René Meister (renem.net)
Seit ein paar Wochen schon mache ich mir Gedanken wie ich der Flut an Informationen in sozialen Netzen entfliehen kann. Wobei Informationen hier vielleicht nicht das korrekte Wort ist, denn der größte Teil was auf Twitter & Co. geteilt und veröffentlicht wird, ist Content nach dem ich überhaupt ...

The title of this piece translates as “Less social media, more people”.

My favorite quote from it, roughly translated from German is:

I would like to see contributions for which I am really interested, which stimulate me to think, in which I can learn something.

This is about as good a reason to join the IndieWeb as one could want​​.

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👓 The Friendliest Lawsuit Ever Filed Against the Justice Department | Law Fare Blog

The Friendliest Lawsuit Ever Filed Against the Justice Department by Benjamin Wittes (LawFare)
In February, speaking before a joint session of Congress, President Trump declared that: “according to data provided by the Department of Justice, the vast majority of individuals convicted of terrorism and terrorism-related offenses since 9/11 came here from outside of our country.” There's a lot of reason to believe this statement is a compound lie—both to believe that the vast majority of individuals convicted of terrorism-related crimes did not come here from elsewhere and to believe that the career men and women of the Department of Justice did not provide any data suggesting otherwise.
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👓 How the design firm behind the Xbox built the bike of the future | The Verge

How the design firm behind the Xbox built the bike of the future by David Pierce (The Verge)
"We wanted you to be able to take the bike and go with how the city moves." Teague was enlisted to design a new kind of bike by Oregon Manifest, a non-profit dedicated to making the world think differently about bikes. Its Bike Design Project gave firms in five cities the opportunity to build a bike made with their city in mind; the public then voted on the winner, which will enter a limited production run from Fuji Bikes. The New York City bike had a USB phone charger built in; The Evo, from San Francisco, was all about modular storage. Chicago's Blackline bike was a rugged pothole-conquerer of a bike, and Portland's PDX came with an app to personalize the ride just for you. For every different city, a different bike. But the voters picked Seattle. They picked Denny, the bike Jackson and the team at Teague designed with Sizemore Bicycles, a custom-bike maker in the city.

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