Setting my marginalia free | Jeremy Cherfas

Read Setting my marginalia free (jeremycherfas.net)
Thoughts and links
Close readers of this site will have noticed a new item in the top menu: Books &c. That's where my book reviews and notes will live, and, in due time, maybe some other kinds of reviews. I promised I'd write up how I got to this point. Current workflow I am not going to deal…

👓 The Google News Initiative: Building a stronger future for news | Google

Read The Google News Initiative: Building a stronger future for news by Philipp Schindler (www.blog.google)
We are launching the Google News Initiative, an effort to help journalism thrive in the digital age.
This article is even more interesting in light of the other Google blog post I read earlier today entitled Introducing Subscribe with Google. Was today's roll out pre-planned or is Google taking an earlier advantage of Facebook's poor position this week after the "non-data breach" stories that have been running this past week? There's a…

👓 Introducing Subscribe with Google | Google

Read Introducing Subscribe with Google by Jim Albrecht (www.blog.google)
Making digital subscriptions simple by making it easier to subscribe and enjoy premium content
Interesting to see this roll out as Facebook is having some serious data collection problems. This looks a bit like a means for Google to directly link users with content they're consuming online and then leveraging it much the same way that Facebook was with apps and companies like Cambridge Analytica. Highlights, Quotes, & Marginalia…

👓 Living Bits: Information and the Origin of Life | PBS

Read Living Bits: Information and the Origin of Life by Christoph Adami (pbs.org)
What is life? When Erwin Schrödinger posed this question in 1944, in a book of the same name, he was 57 years old. He had won the Nobel in Physics eleven years earlier, and was arguably past his glory days. Indeed, at that time he was working mostly on his ill-fated “Unitary Field Theory.” By all accounts, the publication of “What is Life?”—venturing far outside of a theoretical physicist’s field of expertise—raised many eyebrows. How presumptuous for a physicist to take on one of the deepest questions in biology! But Schrödinger argued that science should not be compartmentalized: “Some of us should venture to embark on a synthesis of facts and theories, albeit with second-hand and incomplete knowledge of some of them—and at the risk of making fools of ourselves.” Schrödinger’s “What is Life” has been extraordinarily influential, in one part because he was one of the first who dared to ask the question seriously, and in another because it was the book that was read by a good number of physicists—famously both Francis Crick and James Watson independently, but also many a member of the “Phage group,” a group of scientists that started the field of bacterial genetics—and steered them to new careers in biology. The book is perhaps less famous for the answers Schrödinger suggested, as almost all of them have turned out to be wrong.
Highlights, Quotes, & Marginalia our existence can succinctly be described as “information that can replicate itself,” the immediate follow-up question is, “Where did this information come from?” from an information perspective, only the first step in life is difficult. The rest is just a matter of time. Through decades of work by legions of scientists,…

👓 Open web annotation of audio and video | Jon Udell

Read Open web annotation of audio and video by Jon UdellJon Udell (Jon Udell)
Text, as the Hypothesis annotation client understands it, is HTML, or PDF transformed to HTML. In either case, it’s what you read in a browser, and what you select when you make an annotation. What’s the equivalent for audio and video? It’s complicated because although browsers enable us to select passages of text, the standard media players built into browsers don’t enable us to select segments of audio and video. It’s trivial to isolate a quote in a written document. Click to set your cursor to the beginning, then sweep to the end. Now annotation can happen. The browser fires a selection event; the annotation client springs into action; the user attaches stuff to the selection; the annotation server saves that stuff; the annotation client later recalls it and anchors it to the selection. But selection in audio and video isn’t like selection in text. Nor is it like selection in images, which we easily and naturally crop. Selection of audio and video happens in the temporal domain. If you’ve ever edited audio or video you’ll appreciate what that means. Setting a cursor and sweeping a selection isn’t enough. You can’t know that you got the right intro and outro by looking at the selection. You have to play the selection to make sure it captures what you intended. And since it probably isn’t exactly right, you’ll need to make adjustments that you’ll then want to check, ideally without replaying the whole clip.
Jon Udell has been playing around with media fragments to create some new functionality in Hypothes.is. The nice part is that he's created an awesome little web service for quickly and easily editing media fragments online for audio and video (including YouTube videos) which he's also open sourced on GitHub. I suspect that media fragments…

Thoughts on linkblogs, bookmarks, reads, likes, favorites, follows, and related links

Within the social media space there's a huge number of services that provide a variety of what I would call bookmark-type functionality of one sort or another. They go under a variety of monikers including bookmarks, likes, favorites, stars, reads, follows, claps, and surely many quirky others. Each platform has created its own semantics which…

Organizing my research related reading

There's so much great material out there to read and not nearly enough time. The question becomes: "How to best organize it all, so you can read even more?" I just came across a tweet from Michael Nielsen about the topic, which is far deeper than even a few tweets could do justice to, so…

📖 Read pages 97-119 of Ramona the Brave by Beverly Cleary

📖 Read pages 97-119, Chapter 6: Parent's Night, of Ramona The Brave by Beverly Cleary (William Morrow and Company, 1975, ISBN: 0-688-22015-0) Ramona broods at home with a baby sitter while her parents learn about the Owl Incident. Ramona spends the first night in her new room. Highlights, Quotes, & Marginalia Chapter 6: Parent's Night…

👓 How Facebook Is Killing Comedy | Splitsider

Read How Facebook Is Killing Comedy by Sarah Aswell (Splitsider)
Last month, in its second round of layoffs in as many years, comedy hub Funny or Die reportedly eliminated its entire editorial team following a trend of comedy websites scaling back, shutting down, or restructuring their business model away from original online content. Hours after CEO Mike Farah delivered the news via an internal memo, Matt Klinman took to Twitter, writing, “Mark Zuckerberg just walked into Funny or Die and laid off all my friends.” It was a strong sentiment for the longtime comedy creator, who started out at UCB and The Onion before launching Pitch, the Funny or Die-incubated joke-writing app, in 2017.
This article really has so much. It also contains a microcosm of what's been happening in journalism recently as well. I have a feeling that if outlets like Funny or Die were to go back and own their original content, there would still be a way for them to exist, we just need to evolve…

📖 Read pages 163-194 of Ratio by Michael Ruhlman

📖 Read pages 163-194, Part 4: Fat-Based Sauces, of Ratio: The Simple Codes Behind the Craft of Everyday Cooking by Michael Ruhlman (Scribner, 2009, ISBN: 978-1-4165-661-3) Mayonnaise: 20 parts oil: 1 part liquid: 1 part yolk Hollandaise: 5 parts butter: 1 part liquid: 1 part yolk Vinaigrette: 3 parts oil: 1 part vinegar Rule of…

📖 Read pages 127-162 of Ratio by Michael Ruhlman

📖 Read pages 127-162, Part 3: Meat: Sausage, Mousseline, and Other Meat-Related Ratios, of Ratio: The Simple Codes Behind the Craft of Everyday Cooking by Michael Ruhlman (Scribner, 2009, ISBN: 978-1-4165-661-3) I like the idea of considering the traditional American hamburger as a special kind of sausage. This general abstraction appeals to the mathematician in…

Book Review: Made to Stick: Why Some Ideas Survive and Others Die Author by Chip Heath and Dan Heath

Read Made to Stick: Why Some Ideas Survive and Others Die by Chip Heath and Dan Heath
An awesome and quick read. I love that in some sense, they actually use their own advice when writing this to make some of their own ideas a bit more sticky. I thought this was a good little read and provides some interesting and very useful and actionable ideas. Definitely worth reviewing over some of…

IndieWeb Collection

Over the past several years I've written a broad number of pieces about the IndieWeb. I find that many people are now actively searching for, reading, and implementing various versions of what I've done, particularly on the WordPress Platform. Because of some discussions at IndieWebCamp Baltimore, work I'm doing on my related book, interactions with…