❤️ Bitcoin propaganda posters in Brighton | Jeremy Keith

Bitcoin propaganda posters in Brighton. by Jeremy Keith (adactio.com)

Bitcoin posters in Brighton

I love the overall advertising concept here–particularly for such a modern product.

I’m almost half-tempted to commission someone to re-purpose old war propaganda posters like this to promote the Indieweb movement.

He controls his own website–and they love that.

Don’t let that shadow touch them. Own your domain.

She may be… accepting Webmentions.

INDIEWEB

First they ignore you.

Then they laugh at you.

Then they fight you.

Then you WIN

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Working Facebook’s Land

Media Companies Are Getting Sick of Facebook by Sarah Frier and Gerry Smith (Bloomberg Businessweek)
News outlets are complaining about Facebook’s terms for TV-quality videos meant to compete with YouTube.

It’s getting tougher for CNN and others to view these arrangements as mutually beneficial. “Facebook is about Facebook,” says Andrew Morse, general manager of CNN’s digital operations. “For them, these are experiments, but for the media companies looking to partner with ­significant commitments, it gets to be a bit of whiplash.” Morse says the financial compensation Facebook offers isn’t enough to convince him that working directly with the social network will be worthwhile in the long term.

Jason Kint, chief executive officer of the industry trade group Digital Content Next, was more blunt. “Media companies are like serfs working Facebook’s land,” he says.

Yet another prime example why people should be owning and controlling their own content.

(h/t: iwantmyname.com)

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❤️ Nick Jones – Interface Prototyper / Designer | Adactio.com

Nick Jones - Interface Prototyper / Designer by Jeremy Keith (adactio.com)
A really interesting and well-executed portfolio site, utterly let down by the tone of this demeaning and insulting piece of copy: WARNING: Do not proceed if you suffer from vertigo or if you find experimental interfaces offensive. (Pssst: copy is also interface.)

App.net archive

App.net archive by Manton Reece (manton.org)
Linkrot and the lack of permanence on the web is a recurring theme for this blog. In the final days as App.net was winding down, I wanted to put my money where my mouth was. I spun up a couple new servers and wrote a set of scripts to essentially download every post on App.net. It feels like a fragile archive, put together hastily, but I believe it’s mostly complete. I’ve also downloaded thumbnail versions of some of the public photos hosted on App.net.

Interesting to see that Manton Reece created an impromptu archive of all of App.net before it shut down.​​

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I love Eat This Podcast

Food as a vehicle to explore the byways of taste, economics and trade, culture, science, history, archaeology, geography and just about anything else.

Many who follow my blog recently will know that I’ve been binge listening to Jeremy Cherfas‘ wonderful podcast series: Eat This Podcast.

I’m now so many wonderful episodes in, that it was far past time to give something back to Jeremy for the hours of work he’s put in to give me so much entertainment, enjoyment, and even knowledge. So I just made a pledge to support him on Patreon.

If you haven’t been paying attention, Eat This Podcast is a fantastic series on food, but it it uses the “foods we eat to examine and shed light on the lives we lead, from authenticity to zoology”. Food becomes his “vehicle to explore the byways of taste, economics and trade, culture, science, history, archaeology, geography and just about anything else.”

It’s unlike much of anything I’ve seen or followed in the food space for some time. As someone who is a fan of the science of food and fantastic writers like Harold McGee, Herve This, Alton Brown, Tom Standage, Michael Pollan, Nathan Myhrvold, Maxime Bilet, Matt Gross, and Michael Ruhlman (to name only a few), Eat This Podcast is now a must listen for me.

Not only are the episodes always interesting and unique, they’re phenomenally well researched and produced. You’d think he had a massive staff and production support at the level of a news organization like NPR. By way of mentioning NPR, I wanted to highlight the thought, care, and skill he puts into not only the stunning audio quality, but into the selection of underlying photos, musical bumpers, and the links to additional resources he finds along the way.

And if my recommendation isn’t enough, then perhaps knowing that this one person effort has been nominated for the James Beard Award in both 2015 and 2016 may tip the scales?

If you haven’t listened to any of them yet, I highly recommend you take a peek at what he has to offer. You can subscribe, download, and listen to them all for free. If you’re so inclined, I hope you’ll follow my lead and make a pledge to support his work on Patreon as well.

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#DTMH2016: Saving Online News | NPR RAD recap

#DTMH2016: Saving Online News (RAD recap) (with images, tweets) by NPR Research, Archives, & Data StrategyNPR Research, Archives, & Data Strategy (Storify)
Dodging The Memory Hole is an action-oriented conference and event series that brings together journalists, technologists, and information specialists to strategize solutions for organizing and preserving born-digital news.
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Web Science and Digital Libraries Research Group: 2016-10-13: Dodging The Memory Hole 2016 Trip Report (#dtmh2016)

2016-10-13: Dodging The Memory Hole 2016 Trip Report (#dtmh2016) by John BerlinJohn Berlin (Web Science and Digital Libraries Research Group: ws-dl.blogspot.com)
A summary/recap of the Dodging the Memory Hole 2016 conference held at UCLA's Charles Young Research Library in Los Angeles, California over two days in October to discuss and highlight potential solutions to the issue of preserving born-digital news.
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Warren Weaver Bot!

Someone has built a Warren Weaver Bot! by WeaverbotWeaverbot (Twitter)
This is the signal for the second.

How can you not follow this twitter account?!

Now I’m waiting for a Shannon bot and a Weiner bot. Maybe a John McCarthy bot would be apropos too?!

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Mendeley integration is here! Import your Mendeley reference library into Overleaf

Mendeley integration is here! Import your Mendeley reference library into Overleaf (overleaf.com)
You can now import your reference library directly from Mendeley to Overleaf, to make it easy to manage your references and citations in your projects
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Professor Emeritus Seymour Papert, pioneer of constructionist learning, dies at 88

Professor Emeritus Seymour Papert, pioneer of constructionist learning, dies at 88 (MIT News)
World-renowned mathematician, learning theorist, and educational-technology visionary was a founding faculty member of the MIT Media Lab.
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How publications are committing harakari! 

How publications are committing harakari!  by Om MalikOm Malik (Om Malik)
I have become increasingly frustrated by the fact that many of the publications I used to like are turning into churnicle factories, creating platforms for anybody and everybody to post whatever dr…
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