I’ve spent part of the day cleaning up some of my checkin data on my website. As I was going through I realized a quirky error had duplicated many and was somehow stripping out additional photos.

There was also another code error which was mixing many of the checkins into my longer form articles. I’ve got a temporary fix, but need to create a filter to fix things longer term. While fixing it, I couldn’t help hearing the haunting words of Richard MacManus who recently said “…I certainly don’t want a bunch of other peoples’ checkins clogging up my feed reader.” Though I’ve spent some time trying to split out content types, I can’t help but think he was referring specifically to me. Sorry Richard!

Doing a demo of POSSE and Webmentions at the Pasadena WordPress Developer Meetup.

Here are some resources for those attending:

 

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My article The Facebook Algorithm Mom Problem hit #1 on Hacker News this morning (a first for me)!

Sadly, due to some quirky bugs last week, I’d turned caching off for the first time in 3 years, so my server has tipped over. If you’re having problems reading it, here’s an archived version.

Note to self: Don’t read the comments.

The Facebook Algorithm Mom Problem is #1 on Hacker News today.

Update:

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I’ve been meaning to do it for quite a while, but I’ve finally started a stub in the Indieweb wiki for the topic Indieweb for Journalism.

There is a rapidly growing group of writers and journalists who have been joining the Indieweb movement, and it’s long overdue to create a list of resources specific to the topic to help out ourselves and others in the future.

I invite others like Dan Gillmor, Richard MacManus, Bill Bennett, Jeff Jarvis, Jay Rosen, Aram Zucker-Scharff and others to feel free to add to, change, or modify the page to add resources they’re aware of as well. Not on the list? Feel free to add yourself too!

I’d also welcome everyone to join in the conversation online via webchat, IRC, Slack, or Matrix. Hopefully we can all make each others’ sites better and more useful for our daily writing work. (If anyone needs help logging into the wiki or getting set up, I’m happy to help.)

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You know it was an awesome Indieweb Summit for WordPress, when you log in and see all these awesome updates!

Just some of the WordPress related updates that were built and released at the Indieweb Summit this weekend in Portland.

Congratulations and Thank You to Matthias Pfefferle, David Shanske, Ryan Barrett, Michael Bishop, Asher Silberman, Brandon Kraft, Lillian Karabaic and all of the others in the Indieweb community who provided the setting, conversation, thinking, and underpinning that made all this possible!

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📖 Read pages 16-55 of A Mind at Play by Jimmy Soni & Rob Goodman

📖 Read pages 16-55 of A Mind at Play: How Claude Shannon Invented the Information Age by Jimmy Soni & Rob Goodman

Knowing that I’ve read a lot about Shannon and even Vannevar Bush over the years, I’m pleasantly surprised to read some interesting tidbits about them that I’ve not previously come across.  I was a bit worried that this text wouldn’t provide me with much or anything new on the subjects at hand.

I’m really appreciating some of the prose and writing structure, particularly given that it’s a collaborative work between two authors. At times there are some really nonstandard sentence structures, but they’re wonderful in their rule breaking.

They’re doing an excellent job so far of explaining the more difficult pieces of science relating to information theory. In fact, some of the intro was as good as I think I’ve ever seen simple explanations of what is going on within the topic. I’m also pleased that they’ve made some interesting forays into topics like eugenics and the background role it played in the story for Shannon.

They had a chance to do a broader view of the history of computing, but opted against it, or at least must have made a conscious choice to leave out Babbage/Lovelace within the greater pantheon. I can see narratively why they may have done this knowing what is to come later in the text, but a few sentences as a nod would have been welcome.

The book does, however, get on my nerves with one of my personal pet peeves in popular science and biographical works like this: while there are reasonable notes at the end, absolutely no proper footnotes appear at the bottoms of pages or even indicators within the text other than pieces of text with quotation marks. I’m glad the notes even exist in the back, but it just drives me crazy that publishers blatantly hide them this way. The text could at least have had markers indicating where to find the notes. What are we? Animals?

Nota bene: I’m currently reading an advanced reader copy of this; the book won’t be out until mid-July 2017.

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