👓 Technology preview: Private contact discovery for Signal | Signal

Technology preview: Private contact discovery for Signal by moxie0 (Signal)
At Signal, we’ve been thinking about the difficulty of private contact discovery for a long time. We’ve been working on strategies to improve our current design, and today we’ve published a new private contact discovery service. Using this service, Signal clients will be able to efficiently and scalably determine whether the contacts in their address book are Signal users without revealing the contacts in their address book to the Signal service.

There’s a lot of work involved here, but this is an intriguing proposition for doing contact discovery in social media while maintaining privacy. I can’t wait to see which silos follow suit, but I’m even more curious if any adventurous IndieWeb creators will travel down this road?

h/t cryptographer Matthew Green

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👓 Facebook Figured Out My Family Secrets, And It Won’t Tell Me How | Gizmodo

Facebook Figured Out My Family Secrets, And It Won't Tell Me How by Kashmir Hill (Gizmodo)
Rebecca Porter and I were strangers, as far as I knew. Facebook, however, thought we might be connected. Her name popped up this summer on my list of “People You May Know,” the social network’s roster of potential new online friends for me.
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👓 How to See What the Internet Knows About You (And How to Stop It) | New York Times

How to See What the Internet Knows About You (And How to Stop It) by Tim Herrera (New York Times)
Welcome to the second edition of the Smarter Living newsletter.
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What could happen if you refuse to unlock your phone at the US border? | Ars Technica

What could happen if you refuse to unlock your phone at the US border? by Cyrus Farivar (Ars Technica)
DHS says agents are in the right to ask for passwords, decryption help.

Continue reading “What could happen if you refuse to unlock your phone at the US border? | Ars Technica”

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Let them paste passwords | NCSC Site

Let them paste passwords by Sacha B (ncsc.gov.uk)
Allow your website to accept pasted passwords - it makes your site more secure, not less.

One of the things people often tweet to us @ncsc are examples of websites which prevent you pasting in a password. Why do websites do this? The debate has raged – with most commentators raging how annoying it is.

So why do organisations do this? Often no reason is given, but when one is, that reason is ‘security’. The NCSC don’t think the reasons add up. We think that stopping password pasting (or SPP) is a bad thing that reduces security. We think customers should be allowed to paste their passwords into forms, and that it improves security. Continue reading “Let them paste passwords | NCSC Site”

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Go To Hellman: How to check if your library is leaking catalog searches to Amazon

How to check if your library is leaking catalog searches to Amazon by Rob Hellman (go-to-hellman.blogspot.com)

Continue reading “Go To Hellman: How to check if your library is leaking catalog searches to Amazon”

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EFF’s full-page Wired ad: Dear tech, delete your logs before it’s too late | Boing Boing

EFF's full-page Wired ad: Dear tech, delete your logs before it's too late by Cory Doctorow (Boing Boing)
EFF has run a full-page ad in this month’s Wired, addressed to the technology industry, under the banner “Your threat model just changed,” warning them that the incoming administr…

Continue reading “EFF’s full-page Wired ad: Dear tech, delete your logs before it’s too late | Boing Boing”

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Tom Wheeler Resigns From the FCC—So Long, Net Neutrality | WIRED

Tom Wheeler Resigns From the FCC—So Long, Net Neutrality by Klint Finley (WIRED)
The man who saved net neutrality is stepping aside.

Continue reading “Tom Wheeler Resigns From the FCC—So Long, Net Neutrality | WIRED”

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Chris Aldrich is reading “Off-Grid in Alaska: Farewell and Thanks for the Fish!”

Off-Grid in Alaska: Farewell and Thanks for the Fish! by Jennie Wardle (jenninewardle.com)
I'd like to share some of our lessons learned to aid anyone dreaming of going entirely off-grid in the wilderness.
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Moneyball for Book Publishers: A Detailed Look at How We Read

Moneyball for Book Publishers: A Detailed Look at How We Read (The New York Times)
A reader analytics company in London wants to use data on our reading habits to transform how publishers acquire, edit and market books.

likes Moneyball for Book Publishers: A Detailed Look at How We Read – The New York Times

readingdata-1050

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2015 Viterbi Lecture: H. Vincent Poor on “Fundamental Limits on Information Security and Privacy”

H. Vincent Poor will deliver the 2015 Viterbi Lecture on "Fundamental Limits on Information Security and Privacy" at USC's Ming Hsieh Department of Electrical Engineeing

USC’s Ming Hsieh Department of Electrical Engineeing has announced that H. Vincent Poor will deliver the 2015 Viterbi Lecture

“Fundamental Limits on Information Security and Privacy”

H. Vincent Poor
H. Vincent Poor

H. Vincent Poor, Ph.D.  
Dean of the School of Engineering and Applied Science
Michael Henry Strater University Professor
Princeton University

Education

  • Ph.D., Princeton University, 1977
  • M.A., in Electrical Engineering, Princeton University, 1976
  • M.S., in Electrical Engineering, Auburn University, 1974
  • B.E.E., with Highest Honor, Auburn University, 1972

Lecture Information

Tuesday, March 24, 2015
Hughes Electrical Engineering Center (EEB) 132
Reception 3:00pm
Lecture 4:00pm

Abstract

As has become quite clear from recent headlines, the ubiquity of technologies such as wireless communications and on-line data repositories has created new challenges in information security and privacy. Information theory provides fundamental limits that can guide the development of methods for addressing these challenges. After a brief historical account of the use of information theory to characterize secrecy, this talk will review two areas to which these ideas have been applied successfully: wireless physical layer security, which examines the ability of the physical properties of the radio channel to provide confidentiality in data transmission; and utility-privacy tradeoffs of data sources, which quantify the balance between the protection of private information contained in such sources and the provision of measurable benefits to legitimate users of them. Several potential applications of these ideas will also be discussed.

Biography

H. Vincent Poor (Ph.D., Princeton 1977) is Dean of the School of Engineering and Applied Science at Princeton University, where he is also the Michael Henry Strater University Professor. From 1977 until he joined the Princeton faculty in 1990, he was a faculty member at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. He has also held visiting appointments at a number of other universities, including most recently at Stanford and Imperial College. His research interests are primarily in the areas of information theory and signal processing, with applications in wireless networks and related fields. Among his publications in these areas is the recent book Principles of Cognitive Radio (Cambridge University Press, 2013). At Princeton he has developed and taught several courses designed to bring technological subject matter to general audiences, including “The Wireless Revolution” (in which Andrew Viterbi was one of the first guest speakers) and “Six Degrees of Separation: Small World Networks in Science, Technology and Society.”

Dr. Poor is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and the National Academy of Sciences, and is a foreign member of the Royal Society. He is a former President of the IEEE Information Theory Society, and a former Editor-in-Chief of the IEEE Transactions on Information Theory. He currently serves as a director of the Corporation for National Research Initiatives and of the IEEE Foundation, and as a member of the Council of the National Academy of Engineering. Recent recognition of his work includes the 2014 URSI Booker Gold Medal, and honorary doctorates from several universities in Asia and Europe.

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