🔖 A de Bruijn identity for discrete random variables by Oliver Johnson, Saikat Guha

A de Bruijn identity for discrete random variables by Oliver Johnson, Saikat Guha(arxiv.org)
We discuss properties of the "beamsplitter addition" operation, which provides a non-standard scaled convolution of random variables supported on the non-negative integers. We give a simple expression for the action of beamsplitter addition using generating functions. We use this to give a self-contained and purely classical proof of a heat equation and de Bruijn identity, satisfied when one of the variables is geometric.
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🔖 A Physical Basis for the Second Law of Thermodynamics: Quantum Nonunitarity

A Physical Basis for the Second Law of Thermodynamics: Quantum Nonunitarity by R. E. Kastner(arxiv.org)
It is argued that if the non-unitary measurement transition, as codified by Von Neumann, is a real physical process, then the "probability assumption" needed to derive the Second Law of Thermodynamics naturally enters at that point. The existence of a real, indeterministic physical process underlying the measurement transition would therefore provide an ontological basis for Boltzmann's Stosszahlansatz and thereby explain the unidirectional increase of entropy against a backdrop of otherwise time-reversible laws. It is noted that the Transactional Interpretation (TI) of quantum mechanics provides such a physical account of the non-unitary measurement transition, and TI is brought to bear in finding a physically complete, non-ad hoc grounding for the Second Law.

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Quantum Information Meets Quantum Matter

Quantum Information Meets Quantum Matter -- From Quantum Entanglement to Topological Phase in Many-Body Systems by Bei Zeng, Xie Chen, Duan-Lu Zhou, Xiao-Gang Wen(arxiv.org)
This is the draft version of a textbook, which aims to introduce the quantum information science viewpoints on condensed matter physics to graduate students in physics (or interested researchers). We keep the writing in a self-consistent way, requiring minimum background in quantum information science. Basic knowledge in undergraduate quantum physics and condensed matter physics is assumed. We start slowly from the basic ideas in quantum information theory, but wish to eventually bring the readers to the frontiers of research in condensed matter physics, including topological phases of matter, tensor networks, and symmetry-protected topological phases.
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