👓 Big names in statistics want to shake up much-maligned P value | Nature

Big names in statistics want to shake up much-maligned P value by Dalmeet Singh Chawla (Nature)
One of scientists’ favourite statistics — the P value — should face tougher standards, say leading researchers.

The related articles listed at the bottom, many of which I’d previously read, also give some great additional background.

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👓 Another tenure-track scientist bites the dust | Science

Another tenure-track scientist bites the dust by Adam Ruben (Science)
Matthew knew the deal when he joined his department: 10 years of work, and then you have to apply for tenure. “But,” he told me, “nobody talks about, ‘What if I run out of money beforehand?’”

We’ve really got to reorganize how research is done in this country. The brain drain is destroying our tremendous lead in basic research.

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👓 How to Talk to Famous Professors | The Chronicle

How to Talk to Famous Professors by Robin Bernstein (The Chronicle of Higher Education)
A cheat sheet for making a potential contact without gushing or embarrassing yourself.

Most people just wanted to be treated like people…

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🔖 dokieli

dokie.li (dokie.li)
dokieli is a clientside editor for decentralised article publishing, annotations and social interactions.

dokieli envisions research results, analysis and data all being produced interactively on the Web and seamlessly linked to and from articles. Through annotations and notifications, the academic process of peer-review can be open, transparent and decentralised for researchers.

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📺 Scientific Studies: Last Week Tonight with John Oliver (HBO)

Scientific Studies: Last Week Tonight by John Oliver from HBO
John Oliver discusses how and why media outlets so often report untrue or incomplete information as science.

This episode reminds me a bit about a short snippet I wrote in 2015 about the Evolution of a Scientific Journal Article Title (from Nature to TMZ)

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I am an Arctic researcher. Donald Trump is deleting my citations | The Guardian

I am an Arctic researcher. Donald Trump is deleting my citations by Victoria Herrmann (The Guardian)
These politically motivated data deletions come at a time when the Arctic is warming twice as fast as the global average

Continue reading “I am an Arctic researcher. Donald Trump is deleting my citations | The Guardian”

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A reply to Kimberly Hirsch: Doing my part to fix the internet

Doing my part to fix the internet by Kimberly Hirsh
I have put all the tech in place that I need to, I think, for my publishing to happen here at kimberlyhirsh.com, go out to my various social places, and then have responses come back here.

Kimberly, Congratulations and welcome to the #indieweb! Interestingly, I’m seeing your post via Superfeedr piped into an IRC channel on freenode rather than webmention to my own site (since upgrading to the most recent version of Webmention for WordPress, I apparently need to re-enable exotic webmentions to my homepage).

I’m amazed that such a short comment that I wrote on my site back in November (and syndicated manually to another’s) should not only crop up again, but that it could have had such an influence. Further, the fact that there’s now a method by which communication on the internet can let me know that any of it happened really warms my heart to no end. As a counter example, I feel sad that without an explicit manual ping, Vicki Boykis is left out of the conversation of knowing how influential her words have been.

Kimberly, I’m curious to know how difficult you found it to set things up? A group of us would love to know so we can continue to make the process of enabling indieweb functionality on WordPress easier for others in the future. (Feel free to call, email, text, comment below, or, since you’re able to now, write back on your own website–whichever is most convenient for you. My contact information is easily discovered on my homepage.)

If it helps to make mobile use easier for you, you might find Sharing from the #IndieWeb on Mobile (Android) with Apps an interesting template to follow. Though it was written for a different CMS, you should be able to substitute WordPress specific URLs in their place:

Template examples
Like: http://kimberlyhirsh.com.com/wp-admin/post-new.php?kind=like&kindurl=@url
Reply: http://kimberlyhirsh.com.com/wp-admin/post-new.php?kind=reply&kindurl=@url

You might also find some useful functionality hiding at WordPress Bookmarklets for Desktop if you haven’t come across it yet.

As someone who works in academic circles and whose “professional and personal interests are intertwined, I choose not to separate the two” on my site either, to help people more easily subscribe to subsets of data from my site more easily, I did a few things I’ve documented here: RSS Feeds. Additionally, choosing what gets syndicated to other sites like Twitter and Facebook rounds out the rest.

There are a number of other folks including myself using their sites essentially as commonplace books–something you may appreciate. Some of us are also pushing the envelope in areas like hightlights, annotationsmarginalia, archiving, etc. Many of these have topic pages at Indieweb.org along with examples you might find useful to emulate or extend if you’d like to explore, add, or extend those functionalities.

If you need help to get yourself logged into the indieweb wiki or finding ways to interact with the growing community of incredibly helpful and generous indeweb people, I am (and many others are) happy to help in any way we can. We’d love to hear your voice.

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Updated: Santa Fe feeling the effects of Trump’s policies

Updated: Santa Fe feeling the effects of Trump's policies by Andy Stiny (abqjournal.com)
Reports reveal that some invitees will now not travel to events in U.S.

Continue reading “Updated: Santa Fe feeling the effects of Trump’s policies”

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👓 Why Facts Don’t Change Our Minds | The New Yorker

Why Facts Don’t Change Our Minds by Elizabeth Kolbert (The New Yorker)
New discoveries about the human mind show the limitations of reason.

The vaunted human capacity for reason may have more to do with winning arguments than with thinking straight.
The vaunted human capacity for reason may have more to do with winning arguments than with thinking straight. Credit Illustration by Gérard DuBois
Continue reading “👓 Why Facts Don’t Change Our Minds | The New Yorker”
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In Discarded Women’s March Signs, Professors Saw a Chance to Save History | The Chronicle of Higher Education

In Discarded Women’s March Signs, Professors Saw a Chance to Save History by Fernanda Zamudio-Suaréz (The Chronicle of Higher Education)
Posters from the rally in Boston will be cataloged and archived.
Dwayne Desaulniers, AP Images

Signs line the fence surrounding Boston Common after the Boston Women’s March for America on Saturday. Some of those signs could end up in an archive at Northeastern U.

The signs were pink, blue, black, white. Some were hoisted with wooden sticks, and others were held in protesters’ hands. A few sparkled with glitter, and some had original designs, created on computers with the help of a few internet memes.

Still, at the Boston Women’s March for America on Saturday, hundreds of the signs criticizing President Trump’s campaign promises and administrative agenda ended up wrapped around the fence near Boston Common, laid down like a carpet covering the sidewalk. Continue reading “In Discarded Women’s March Signs, Professors Saw a Chance to Save History | The Chronicle of Higher Education”

Reply to Antonio Sánchez-Padial about webmentions for academic research

a tweet by Antonio Sánchez-PadialAntonio Sánchez-Padial (Twitter)
Hi there @ChrisAldrich! I'd like to add webmentions, but I haven't worked on it yet. What kind of collaboration are you thinking about?

Many academics are using academic related social platforms (silos) like Mendeley, Academia.edu, Research Gate and many others to collaborate, share data, and publish their work. (And should they really be trusting that data to those outside corporations?)

A few particular examples: I follow physicist John Carlos Baez and mathematician Terry Tao who both have one or more academic blogs for various topics which they POSSE work to several social silos including Google+ and Twitter. While they get some high quality response to posts natively, some of their conversations are forked/fragmented to those other silos. It would be far more useful if they were using webementions (and Brid.gy) so that all of that conversation was being aggregated to their original posts. If they supported webmentions directly, I suspect that some of their collaborators would post their responses on their own sites and send them after publication as comments. (This also helps to protect primacy and the integrity of the original responses as the receiving site could moderate them out of existence, delete them outright, or even modify them!)

While it’s pretty common for researchers to self-publish (sometimes known as academic samizdat) their work on their own site and then cross-publish to a pre-print server (like arXiv.org), prior to publishing in a (preferrably) major journal. There’s really no reason they shouldn’t just use their own personal websites, or online research journals like yours, to publish their work and then use that to collect direct comments, responses, and replies to it. Except possibly where research requires hosting uber-massive data sets which may be bandwidth limiting (or highly expensive) at the moment, there’s no reason why researchers shouldn’t self-host (and thereby own) all of their work.

Instead of publishing to major journals, which are all generally moving to an online subscription/readership model anyway, they might publish to topic specific hubs (akin to pre-print servers or major publishers’ websites). This could be done in much the same way many Indieweb users publish articles/links to IndieWeb News: they publish the piece on their own site and then syndicate it to the hub by webmention using the hub’s endpoint. The hub becomes a central repository of the link to the original as well as making it easier to subscribe to updates via email, RSS, or other means for hundreds or even thousands of researchers in the given area. Additional functionality could be built into these to support popularity measures as well to help filter some of the content on a weekly or monthly basis, which is essentially what many publishers are doing now.

In the end, citation metrics could be measured directly on the author’s original page by the number of incoming webmetions they’ve received on it as others referencing them would be linking to them and therefore sending webmentions. (PLOS|One does something kind of like this by showing related tweets which mention particular papers now: here’s an example.)

Naturally there is some fragility in some of this and protective archive measures should be taken to preserve sites beyond the authors lives, but much of this could be done by institutional repositories like University libraries which do much of this type of work already.

I’ve been meaning to write up a much longer post about how to use some of these types of technologies to completely revamp academic publishing, perhaps I should finish doing that soon? Hopefully the above will give you a little bit of an idea of what could be done.

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📺 Chris Aldrich watched “My Research Process!” on YouTube

My Research Process! by Ellie Mackin from YouTube
From idea to finished manuscript - this is all the ins and outs of how I do my research - it goes quite well with this blog post, which I neglected to mentio...

From idea to finished manuscript – this is all the ins and outs of how I do my research – it goes quite well with this blog post, which I neglected to mention in the video… http://www.elliemackin.net/blog/tech-tools-and-research

My bookshelf! https://ellie.libib.com
Using the Gantt chart in my research planning: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pKD5hDGfVb8
Research planning in a Bullet Journal: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DHL9t9e-hjQ
Academic Bullet Journal: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IZ3Aacpelic
Academic Otters: https://lizgloyn.wordpress.com/2011/07/21/the-proper-care-and-feeding-of-academic-otters/
CamScanner: https://www.camscanner.com

 

💬 Reply to video

In addition to camscanner, and because you use OneNote, you might find Office Lens to be a useful phone app for photographing individual pages and transferring them directly into your OneNote application. It usually does a great job of taking poorly positioned photographs or photos from odd angles and cleaning them up to look as if you’d spent far more time positioning the pages and taking the photos.

For those capturing photographs of primary sources, I’ve recently found Google’s PhotoScan mobile app to be incredibly good, particularly at re-positioning the corners of photos and reducing glare.

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