📖 On page 24 of 274 of Complex Analysis with Applications by Richard A. Silverman

📖 On page 24 of 274 of Complex Analysis with Applications by Richard A. Silverman

I enjoyed his treatment of inversion, but it seems like there’s a better way of laying the idea out, particularly for applications. Straightforward coverage of nested intervals and rectangles, limit points, convergent sequences, Cauchy convergence criterion. Given the level, I would have preferred some additional review of basic analysis and topology; he seems to do the bare minimum here.

📖 On page 16 of Dealing with China by Henry M. Paulson, Jr.

📖 On page 16 of 448 of Dealing with China by Henry M. Paulson, Jr.

A simple preface followed by an anecdote about the beginning of a deal relating to telecom. The style is quick moving and history, details, and philosophy are liberally injected into the story as it moves along. This seems both interesting as well as instructive.

Highlights, Quotes, & Marginalia

“There are some who believe that an immutable law of history holds that conflict is inevitable when a rising power begins to bump up against an established one. But no law is immutable. Choices matter. Lessons can be learned.”

—page XIV

“Prescriptions, after all, are easier to make than predictions.”

—page XIV

“Note taking allows Party and government officials to get quick reads on what went on at meetings they didn’t attend. […] Private meetings with senior government officials without recoring devices or note takers are rare and highly sought after.”

—page 10

“…the so-called iron rice bowl, the cradle-to-grave care and support guaranteed by the government through the big companies people worked for.”

—page 11

“The Party had made a simple bargain with the people: economic growth in return for political stability. That in turn meant Party control. Prosperity was the source of Party legitimacy.”

—page 11

“Messages in China are sent in ways that aren’t always direct; you have to read the signs.”

—page 14

“It was the nature of dealing with China: nothing was done until it was done.”

—page 14

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📗 Started reading Dealing with China by Henry M. Paulson, Jr.

📗 Started reading Dealing with China by Henry M. Paulson, Jr.

Former head of Goldman Sachs and U.S. Treasury Secretary Henry M. Paulson , Jr. and the cover of his 2015 book Dealing with China
Former head of Goldman Sachs and U.S. Treasury Secretary Henry M. Paulson , Jr. and the cover of his 2015 book Dealing with China

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🔖 Want to read Dealing with China: An Insider Unmasks the New Economic Superpower by Henry M. Paulson, Jr.

🔖 Want to read Dealing with China: An Insider Unmasks the New Economic Superpower by Henry M. Paulson, Jr.

Picked up a copy at Little Free Library #21797 at 8:29 am
ISBN: 978-1-4555-0421-3 First Edition Hardcover

Former head of Goldman Sachs and U.S. Treasury Secretary Henry M. Paulson , Jr. and the cover of his 2015 book Dealing with China
Former head of Goldman Sachs and U.S. Treasury Secretary Henry M. Paulson , Jr. and the cover of his 2015 book Dealing with China
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📕 100.0% done with Fletch’s Moxie by Gregory Mcdonald

📕 100.0% done with Fletch’s Moxie by Gregory Mcdonald

Not sure how I feel about a group of potential suspects showing up in the final act this way. The racists in KKK garb here could certainly have been the motivation for the scenes in the film Fletch Lives.

The plot here was very subtly crafted together and done rather well for a novel format. Things seem to have unraveled so quickly at the end–I wish it had been a tad slower so that I could have enjoyed it longer.

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📖 60.0% done with Fletch’s Moxie by Gregory Mcdonald

📖 60.0% done with Fletch’s Moxie by Gregory Mcdonald

This feels more like a drawing room mystery or a book version of Clue rather than a traditional shoe-leather detective story. All the suspects seem to be holed up in a house and conversing as Fletch makes a few calls out for details. In this sense, it’s not a nail-biter, but is focusing more on character than some of the others in the series.

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📕 100.0% done with Fletch’s Fortune by Gregory Mcdonald

📕 100.0% done with Fletch’s Fortune by Gregory Mcdonald

The second half read incredibly fast. The plot particularly began unfolding in the end almost too quickly. I wish the last act could have lasted a bit longer.

I really enjoyed the Crystal character and the snide banter she continually spouts with Fletch. The wrap up with Freddie was generally unexpected, but delicious in its oddity in the larger canon. There was surprisingly little talk of Fletch’s ex-wives or even of his potentially adding another to the collection.

Some of my favorite jokes were the chapter headings of the schedule of the conference along with even funnily named rooms in which the sessions were taking place.

I’ll hope to write a longer review shortly.

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📖 53.0% done with Fletch’s Fortune by Gregory Mcdonald

📖 53.0% done with Fletch’s Fortune by Gregory Mcdonald

Making good progress, hope to finish tomorrow. There are certainly some interesting characters here, though perhaps feeling like too many, particularly since most seem to potentially have committed the murder.

📖 68.0% done with Fletch by Gregory Mcdonald

📖 68.0% done with Fletch by Gregory Mcdonald

This just keeps getting better. I’m enjoying some of the subtle differences between the film and the book. No surprise that the movie renamed Joan Collins to Boyd. I know I’d read this 20+ years ago and I remember it being darker than the film, but the tone seems lighter to me now somehow.

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🔖 Want to read: Washington: A Life by Ron Chernow

Washington: A Life by Ron ChernowRon Chernow (Amazon.com)
In Washington: A Life celebrated biographer Ron Chernow provides a richly nuanced portrait of the father of our nation. With a breadth and depth matched by no other one-volume life of Washington, this crisply paced narrative carries the reader through his troubled boyhood, his precocious feats in the French and Indian War, his creation of Mount Vernon, his heroic exploits with the Continental Army, his presiding over the Constitutional Convention, and his magnificent performance as America's first president. Despite the reverence his name inspires, Washington remains a lifeless waxwork for many Americans, worthy but dull. A laconic man of granite self-control, he often arouses more respect than affection. In this groundbreaking work, based on massive research, Chernow dashes forever the stereotype of a stolid, unemotional man. A strapping six feet, Washington was a celebrated horseman, elegant dancer, and tireless hunter, with a fiercely guarded emotional life. Chernow brings to vivid life a dashing, passionate man of fiery opinions and many moods. Probing his private life, he explores his fraught relationship with his crusty mother, his youthful infatuation with the married Sally Fairfax, and his often conflicted feelings toward his adopted children and grandchildren. He also provides a lavishly detailed portrait of his marriage to Martha and his complex behavior as a slave master. At the same time, Washington is an astute and surprising portrait of a canny political genius who knew how to inspire people. Not only did Washington gather around himself the foremost figures of the age, including James Madison, Alexander Hamilton, John Adams, and Thomas Jefferson, but he also brilliantly orchestrated their actions to shape the new federal government, define the separation of powers, and establish the office of the presidency. In this unique biography, Ron Chernow takes us on a page-turning journey through all the formative events of America's founding. With a dramatic sweep worthy of its giant subject, Washington is a magisterial work from one of our most elegant storytellers.

🔖 Want to read: Washington: A Life by Ron Chernow (Penguin Press, October 5, 2010) as part of the GoodReads History Book Club (Presidential Series) Book Discussion

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