Weird Flickr URL Trick

Read Weird Flickr URL Trick (CogDogBlog)
I present to you a URL oddity of no significant value. Impress and amaze your friends. And it happened pretty much because of a typo. Ok, here is a URL for one of my recent photos (I kind of like i…
I present to you a URL oddity of no significant value. Impress and amaze your friends.

And it happened pretty much because of a typo.

Ok, here is a URL for one of my recent photos (I kind of like it) (shameless self promotion):

https://www.flickr.com/photos/cogdog/32331643261/

It’s a normal, current flickr page:

Now… add an extraneous extra slash at the end of the same URL:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/cogdog/32331643261//

Woah, it’s the previous flickr design layout!

Note: Logic might assume I could keep slashing back in time to the original white small square design, but alas no.

What use is this? Dunno.

But it is curious. And quirky.

That’s my kind of internet.


Squirtmobile Stunts – 42 flickr photo by rbatina shared under a Creative Commons (BY-NC-ND) license

The post “Weird Flickr URL Trick” was originally thawed from a previous ice age and melted at CogDogBlog (http://cogdogblog.com/2017/01/weird-flickr-trick/) on January 23, 2017.

Source: Weird Flickr URL Trick

He went in to report on crystal meth – before long, Luke Williams was hooked | New Statesman

Read He went in to report on crystal meth – before long, Luke Williams was hooked (newstatesman.com)
The journalist moved into a house of meth addicts to investigate the drug. Within a month, he was using, too.

“I got a story, a very good story,” writes the young Australian journalist Luke Williams in the first chapter of his new book, The Ice Age. “Only it wasn’t the one I was expecting.” For three months in 2014, he lived in a house of crystal meth addicts in a suburb of Melbourne, Australia, to investigate the drug. Within a month, he had forgotten why he was there. He had become addicted himself. Continue reading “He went in to report on crystal meth – before long, Luke Williams was hooked | New Statesman”

Jordan Ellenberg don’t know stat | Rick’s Ramblings

Read Jordan Ellenberg don’t know stat by Rick Durrett, Ph.D. (Rick's Ramblings sites.duke.edu)
There follows a discussion of flipping coins and the fact that frequencies have more random variation when the sample size is small, but he never stops to see if this is enough to explain the observation.

My intuition told me it did not, so I went and got some brain cancer data.

Jordan Ellenberg is called out a bit by Rick Durrett for one of his claims in the best seller How Not To Be Wrong: The Power of Mathematical Thinking.

I remember reading that section of the book and mostly breezing through that argument primarily as a simple example with a limited, but direct point. Durrett decided to delve into the applied math a bit further.

These are some of the subtle issues one eventually comes across when experts read others’ works which were primarily written for much broader audiences.

I also can’t help thinking that one paints a target on one’s back with a book title like that…

BTW, the quote of the day has to be:

… so I went and got some brain cancer data.

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Resilient Web Design

Bookmarked Resilient Web Design (resilientwebdesign.com)
The World Wide Web has been around for long enough now that we can begin to evaluate the twists and turns of its evolution. I wrote this book to highlight some of the approaches to web design that have proven to be resilient. I didn’t do this purely out of historical interest (although I am fascinated by the already rich history of our young industry). In learning from the past, I believe we can better prepare for the future.

You won’t find any code in here to help you build better websites. But you will find ideas and approaches. Ideas are more resilient than code. I’ve tried to combine the most resilient ideas from the history of web design into an approach for building the websites of the future.

I hope you will join me in building a web that lasts; a web that’s resilient.
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🎧 The Secret History of Thoughts | Invisibilia (NPR)

Listened The Secret History of Thoughts from Invisibilia | NPR.org
In "The Secret History of Thoughts," co-hosts Alix Spiegel and Lulu Miller ask the question, "Are my thoughts related to my inner wishes, do they reveal who I really am?" The answer can have profound consequences for your life. Hear the story of a man gripped by violent thoughts, and explore how various psychologists make sense of his experience. Also, meet a man trapped inside his head for 13 years with thoughts as his only companion.

What an awesome little podcast Invisibilia is! Can’t wait to catch the rest of the episodes. Interesting to hear the quick overview of the three schools of thought on thought.

I had been hearing commercials for this off and on from other podcasts for almost a year; glad I finally downloaded to listen.

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Why You Should Use Zotero To Track Your Reading | BOOK RIOT

Read Why You Should Use Zotero To Track Your Reading (BOOK RIOT)
An overview of an app for tracking your reading that offers different tools than Goodreads or Litsy
Zotero logoI’ve been using Zotero, a free, open-source application, to track my reading for several years now. Originally designed for scholars, Zotero has a number of features that make it ideal for readers who want to track a bit more about their books and reading habits than sites like Goodreads or Litsy allow. Of course, I have accounts on Litsy and Goodreads and I still use Zotero. I just use them for really different things (it’s also possible that I’m a little too uptight about tracking my reading). If reading Emma’s post that outlined 8 Reasons to Catalog Your Books got you itching to start tagging and cataloging, I’d strongly suggest Zotero. Continue reading “Why You Should Use Zotero To Track Your Reading | BOOK RIOT”
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Here's What Trump's Latest Executive Orders Do

Read Here's What Trump's Latest Executive Orders Do (The Atlantic)
With a penstroke, President Trump withdrew the U.S. from Trans-Pacific Partnership, imposed a federal hiring freeze, and reinstated the ‘Mexico City policy’ on defunding international abortion-related services.

I have a sinking feeling that he spent more time actually signing these than he did reading them.

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The White House Can’t Easily Repair Its Relationship With the Media | The Atlantic

Read The White House Can't Easily Repair Its Relationship With the Media (The Atlantic)
Press Secretary Sean Spicer continued to suggest on Monday that the media is attempting to undercut the president.

If the Trump administration can’t even get the basic ballpark numbers on a simple (even visual) issue like this correct, how are we supposed to even remotely trust them when it comes to more opaque data and actual mathematics supporting their policy decisions?

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Season Premiere: January 20, 2017 | Real Time with Bill Maher (HBO)

Watched Season Premiere: January 20, 2017 from Real Time with Bill Maher (HBO) | YouTube
Bill and his guests – Jane Fonda, Keith Olbermann, Heather McGhee, Tom Perez, and Jon Meacham – kick off Real Time's 15th season on HBO.

Watching some political satire/comedy in the background today while I work is definitely lifting my spirits.

So Here We Are: Donald Trump Is Officially The President

Watched So Here We Are: Donald Trump Is Officially The President from The Late Show with Stephen Colbert | YouTube
Trump took time during his Inaugural address to talk about how the former President sucks, while Obama had to sit there as helpless as a damp Russian mattres...

Jokes About This Story Present A Golden Opportunity

Watched Jokes About This Story Present A Golden Opportunity from The Late Show with Stephen Colbert | YouTube
At the risk of being a wet blanket, Stephen refuses to engage in any kind of yellow journalism, despite the torrent of PEOTUS stories flooding the country. S...

Trump's Press Secretary Falsely Claims: 'Largest Audience Ever to Witness an Inauguration, Period'

Read Trump's Press Secretary Falsely Claims: 'Largest Audience Ever to Witness an Inauguration, Period' (The Atlantic)
In his first official White House briefing, Sean Spicer blasted journalists for “deliberately false reporting,” and made categorical claims about crowd-size at odds with the available evidence.