👓 I’m Glad I Got Booed at CPAC | New York Times

Read Opinion | I’m Glad I Got Booed at CPAC by Mona Charen (New York Times)
I spoke the truth for the sake of every conservative disgusted by what has happened to our movement.
I saw this article pop up over the weekend, but didn’t have a chance to read it. I circled back around to it after listening to The Daily episode from this morning which covered it. Ultimately I think the podcast version was more interesting and valuable.

I appreciate more and more of these dyed-in-the-wool conservatives who are sticking to their guns on the message that the emperor has no clothes. It gives me more hope for the future.

👓 SPLOT You’re a Rich Text Field | CogDogBlog

Read SPLOT You’re a Rich Text Field by Alan LevineAlan Levine (CogDogBlog)
I’m SPLOT tinkering and feel a wave of totally un-necessary but irresistible song plays… How does it feel to be One of the beautiful splots How often have you added video Often enough to know What did you format when you were there Everything that WordPress can Captions you’re a rich ...
Trying to figure out what a SPLOT is and what it means…

🎧 CPAC in the #MeToo Era | The Daily – New York Times

Listened to ‘The Daily’: CPAC in the Era by Michael Barbaro from New York Times
At the Conservative Political Action Conference this weekend, one thing was clear: President Trump has taken over the conservative movement. His vision dominated, and, as one woman learned, there was little room for alternative views. Guest: Mona Charen, a conservative columnist who was booed while speaking on a panel at the conference.

Phenomenal and interesting interview. I think Mona Charen’s broader philosophy about holding one’s own party to the highest standards is certainly the right position. It’s people like her that will have any chance of reviving what the GOP used to stand for. I hope they’re all the better for it as they come out of the ashes.

👓 Kibbles for My Patreon Bowl? | CogDog

Read Kibbles for My Patreon Bowl? by Alan Levine (CogDogBlog)
Here is my shameless shameful plug. More than two years ago a colleague I respect emailed and started a back and forth exchange. He strongly urged me to set up a donation campaign so I could be supported to do more tool and resource building. I gave it some thought, but then landed a good long term contract, so shelved it. Recently a few others have asked me why I am not patreon-ing, and my answer was more or less a shrug.
Here’s someone with a track record of creating some cool things that actually got delivered. If you’re looking to support helping to get interesting things made and put into the education space, here’s your chance.

🎧 The Daily: Students Protest Gun Violence | The New York Times

Listened to Listen to ‘The Daily’: Students Protest Gun Violence by Michael Barbaro from nytimes.com
Demands for gun restrictions have followed one mass shooting after another, but little has changed. This time, the students who survived are leading the charge.

👓 Studies are increasingly clear: Uber, Lyft congest cities | AP News

Read Studies are increasingly clear: Uber, Lyft congest cities by Steve LeBlanc (AP News)
One promise of ride-hailing companies like Uber and Lyft was fewer cars clogging city streets. But studies suggest the opposite: that ride-hailing companies are pulling riders off buses, subways, bicycles and their own feet and putting them in cars instead. And in what could be a new wrinkle, a service by Uber called Express Pool now is seen as directly competing with mass transit. Uber and Lyft argue that in Boston, for instance, they complement public transit by connecting riders to hubs like Logan Airport and South Station. But they have not released their own specific data about rides, leaving studies up to outside researchers. And the impact of all those cars is becoming clear, said Christo Wilson, a professor of computer science at Boston’s Northeastern University, who has looked at Uber’s practice of surge pricing during heavy volume. “The emerging consensus is that ride-sharing (is) increasing congestion,” Wilson said.
It’s interesting that the “simple” story peddled by ridesharing companies is the one that’s most believed. Outside studies like this are certainly both wanted and needed.

It’s always seemed to me that these companies weren’t quite doing what they said they were from a simple economics standpoint. Particularly with these companies losing money to build market share, they’re essentially subsidizing a portion of their user’s cost. The fact that they’re siphoning off people from public transportation isn’t widely reported. I suspect that outside of major metropolitan areas they’re not doing as much as they are in them. They’re building market share, but primarily by breaking regulations in places with taxi or other related services. I’d certainly love to see more broad based statistics of their ridership compared with statistics from taxi companies and municipal transportation services. I have a feeling the economic piper will eventually come for them when the playing field is leveled.

👓 Sliced And Diced: The Inside Story Of How An Ivy League Food Scientist Turned Shoddy Data Into Viral Studies | Buzzfeed

Read Sliced And Diced: The Inside Story Of How An Ivy League Food Scientist Turned Shoddy Data Into Viral Studies by Stephanie M. Lee (BuzzFeed)
Brian Wansink won fame, funding, and influence for his science-backed advice on healthy eating. Now, emails show how the Cornell professor and his colleagues have hacked and massaged low-quality data into headline-friendly studies to “go virally big time.”
This article is painful to read and has some serious implications for both science in general and the issue of repeat-ability. I suspect that this is an easily caught flagrant case and that it probably only scratches the surface. The increased competition in research and the academy is sure to create more cases of this in the future.

We really need people to begin publishing their negative results and doing a better job on understanding and practicing statistics. Science is already not “believed” by far too many in the United States, we really don’t need bad actors like this eroding the solid foundations we’ve otherwise built.

🎧 The Daily: Mental Health and Mass Shootings | The New York Times

Listened to Listen to ‘The Daily’: Mental Health and Mass Shootings by Michael Barbaro from nytimes.com
President Trump has focused on mental health, rather than weapons, after the mass shooting in Florida. But mental illness is rarely the cause of gun violence.

What a fantastic look at guns and the “mental health” issue.

🎧 The Daily: Russian Trolls’ Favorite Weapon | The New York Times

Listened to Listen to ‘The Daily’: Russian Trolls’ Favorite Weapon by Michael Barbaro from nytimes.com
The indictment secured by the special counsel makes it clear that Facebook was used extensively in the campaign to disrupt the 2016 election. How did Russia do it?

👓 Nassim Taleb explains the power of “skin in the game” | The Economist

Read Nassim Taleb explains the power of “skin in the game” (The Economist)
Skin in the Game: Hidden Asymmetries in Daily Life. By Nassim Nicholas Taleb. Random House; 304 pages; $30. Allen Lane; £20. IN 2001 Nassim Taleb published “Fooled by Randomness”, an entertaining and provocative book on the misunderstood role of chance.
I’ve enjoyed his prior books which I always felt rambled on a bit without a lot of real structure. This review makes me think he’s gone even further off the rails. While I admire and respect his work, it’s very painful to read. I’ve always thought it could stand a far stronger editorial influence to improve its logic and flow. I suspect that while his books sell, they’re not as widely accepted nor do they have the impact that they could have. I’m iffy on whether or not this one is worth the time.

👓 A Democratic Memo Undercuts Key Republican Complaints About the FBI | The Atlantic

Read A Democratic Memo Undercuts Key Republican Complaints About the FBI by Natasha Bertrand (The Atlantic)
The document, drafted by minority members of the House Intelligence Committee, sought to rebut claims that the bureau abused its power during the election.

👓 Book clinic: why do publishers still issue hardbacks? | The Guardian

Read Book clinic: why do publishers still issue hardbacks? by Philip Jones (the Guardian)
The editor of the Bookseller explains why the hardback format will be with us for a while yet
An interesting example of “signaling” value in the publishing industry. Curious how this might play out in a longer study of the evolution of books and written material?

📖 Read One by Kathryn Otoshi

Read One by Kathryn Otoshi (KO Kids Books)
Blue is a quiet color. Red’s a hothead who likes to pick on Blue. Yellow, Orange, Green, and Purple don’t like what they see, but what can they do? When no one speaks up, things get out of hand — until One comes along and shows all the colors how to stand up, stand together, and count. As budding young readers learn about numbers, counting, and primary and secondary colors, they also learn about accepting each other's differences and how it sometimes just takes one voice to make everyone count.
What a great simple concept for a book about how to stand up to bullies. I know a lot of adults who could stand to read this book.
Rating: 5 of 5 stars