Chris Aldrich is reading “A Yale history professor’s powerful, 20-point guide to defending democracy under a Trump presidency”

Read A Yale history professor’s powerful, 20-point guide to defending democracy under a Trump presidency by Timothy Snyder (facebook.com)
Americans are no wiser than the Europeans who saw democracy yield to fascism, Nazism, or communism. Our one advantage is that we might learn from their experience. Now is a good time to do so. Here are twenty lessons from the twentieth century, adapted to the circumstances of today.

Chris Aldrich is reading “Donald Trump speaks with Taiwan’s president—a massive diplomatic reversal that will enrage China”

Read Donald Trump speaks with Taiwan's president—a massive diplomatic reversal that will enrage China (Quartz)
Trump is also interested in opening a hotel there.

Chris Aldrich is reading “A guide to writing recommendation letters that aren’t sexist”

Read A guide to writing recommendation letters that aren't sexist (Quartz)
Sexism in the workplace starts long before the job has even begun.

Chris Aldrich is reading “Do You Want to be Described as Hard Working?”

Read Do You Want to be Described as Hard Working? by Athene Donald (Athene Donald's Blog)
I visited Oxford this week to talk to the Women in Physics group, mainly made up of students and postdocs (not all of whom were women). Tea and excellent scones

Chris Aldrich is reading “Dwight D. Eisenhower: Address ‘The Chance for Peace’ Delivered Before the American Society of Newspaper Editors. April 16, 1953”

Read Dwight D. Eisenhower: Address "The Chance for Peace" Delivered Before the American Society of Newspaper Editors (presidency.ucsb.edu)
Every gun that is made, every warship launched, every rocket fired signifies, in the final sense, a theft from those who hunger and are not fed, those who are cold and are not clothed. This world in arms is not spending money alone. It is spending the sweat of its laborers, the genius of its scientists, the hopes of its children.

Chris Aldrich is reading “My 2017-01-01 #IndieWeb Commitment: Own All My RSVPs To Public Events” by Tantek Çelik

Read My 2017-01-01 Commitment: Own All My RSVPs To Public Events by Tantek ÇelikTantek Çelik (tantek.com)
My commitment for 2017 is to always, 100% of the time, post RSVPs to public events on my own site first, and only secondarily (manually if I must) RSVP to silo (social media) event URLs. What’s your 2017-01-01 commitment?
I love the idea of making an IndieWeb resolution for the New Year. Time to put my thinking cap on and decide which of the 100s of itches it’s (they’re?) going to be?

Chris Aldrich is reading “Self-Hosting kylewm’s Woodwind Indie Reader”

Read Self-Hosting kylewm's Woodwind Indie Reader by Marty McGuireMarty McGuire (martymcgui.re)
One of my favorite aspects of the IndieWeb community is that when you get things

Chris Aldrich is reading “Airbnb horror story is cautionary tale for tourists”

Read Airbnb horror story is cautionary tale for tourists (New York Post)
A dream Thanksgiving vacation in the Big Apple turned into the nightmare before Christmas for a California couple whose Airbnb reservation went bust. Annette van Duren, a 63-year-old talent agent f…

Chris Aldrich is reading “My 2017 Food-Trend Predictions Are the Only 2017 Food-Trend Predictions You Need to Read, Because…”

Read My 2017 Food-Trend Predictions Are the Only 2017 Food-Trend Predictions You Need to Read, Because… (Medium)
A new year is apparently beginning, and so those of us who both eat and write feel compelled to tell you what you should expect from the…

Chris Aldrich is reading “AP Definitive Source | Writing about the ‘alt-right’”

Read AP Definitive Source | Writing about the "alt-right" (blog.ap.org)
Recent developments have put the so-called “alt-right” movement in the news. They highlight the need for clarity around use of the term and around some related terms, such as “white nationalism” and “white supremacism.”
Though they could certainly be abused, standards bodies like the Associated Press can be powerful forces for good in the world.

This piece also reminds me of a Joanne Jacobs quote I wrote about recently.

🔖 American Amnesia: How the War on Government Led Us to Forget What Made America Prosper by Jacob S. Hacker & Paul Pierson

Bookmarked American Amnesia: How the War on Government Led Us to Forget What Made America Prosper (Simon & Schuster, March 29, 2016)
From the groundbreaking author team behind the bestselling Winner-Take-All Politics, a timely and topical work that examines what’s good for American business and what’s good for Americans—and why those interests are misaligned.<br><br> In Winner-Take-All Politics, Jacob S. Hacker and Paul Pierson explained how political elites have enabled and propelled plutocracy. Now in American Amnesia, they trace the economic and political history of the United States over the last century and show how a viable mixed economy has long been the dominant engine of America’s prosperity.<br><br> Like every other prospering democracy, the United States developed a mixed economy that channeled the spirit of capitalism into strong growth and healthy social development. In this bargain, government and business were as much partners as rivals. Public investments in education, science, transportation, and technology laid the foundation for broadly based prosperity. Programs of economic security and progressive taxation provided a floor of protection and business focused on the pursuit of profit—and government addressed needs business could not.<br><br> The mixed economy was the most important social innovation of the twentieth century. It spread a previously unimaginable level of broad prosperity. It enabled steep increases in education, health, longevity, and economic security. And yet, extraordinarily, it is anathema to many current economic and political elites. And as the advocates of anti-government free market fundamentalist have gained power, they are hell-bent on scrapping the instrument of nearly a century of unprecedented economic and social progress. In American Amnesia, Hacker and Pierson explain how—and why they must be stopped.
Earlier tonight I watched a segment on The PBS NewsHour about infrastructure in America that featured this book which came out earlier this year.

📺 Watched PBS NewsHour full episode Dec. 1, 2016

Watched PBS NewsHour full episode Dec. 1, 2016 from PBS NewsHour
Thursday on the NewsHour, President-elect Trump travels to Indiana in celebration of a jobs deal with Carrier. Also, recovery efforts mount as the Tennessee wildfires wane, the future of American manufacturing jobs, volunteer medics struggle to save lives in Mosul, advances in the battle against AIDS, how failing infrastructure is limiting U.S. productivity, a new book on Iran and the war on weed.
The segment on crumbling infrastructure was very interesting and I’ll have to get a copy of American Amnesia: How the War on Government Led Us to Forget What Made America Prosper by Jacob S. Hacker and Paul Pierson (Simon & Schuster, March 29, 2016)

The short snippet on the history of cannabis was also relatively interesting, particularly the discussion of how it’s perception was changed by the government.

Chris Aldrich is reading “Hidebound: The Grisly Invention of Parchment”

Read Hidebound: The Grisly Invention of Parchment by Keith Houston (Longreads)
While most of the Old World was writing on papyrus, bamboo, and silk, Europe carved its own gruesome path through the history books.
An excerpt from the book The Book: A Cover-to-Cover Exploration of the Most Powerful Object of Our Time by Keith Houston[1]

References

[1]
K. Houston, The Book: A Cover-to-Cover Exploration of the Most Powerful Object of Our Time, 1st ed. W. W. Norton, 2016.