Trump’s Press Secretary Falsely Claims: ‘Largest Audience Ever to Witness an Inauguration, Period’ | The Atlantic

Read Trump's Press Secretary Falsely Claims: 'Largest Audience Ever to Witness an Inauguration, Period' by Matt Ford (The Atlantic)
In his first official White House briefing, Sean Spicer blasted journalists for “deliberately false reporting,” and made categorical claims about crowd-size at odds with the available evidence.

Here’s What Trump’s Latest Executive Orders Do | The Atlantic

Read Here's What Trump's Latest Executive Orders Do (The Atlantic)
With a pen stroke, President Trump withdrew the U.S. from the Trans-Pacific Partnership, imposed a federal hiring freeze, and reinstated the “Mexico City policy” on defunding international abortion-related services.

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📖 On page 215 of 321 of At Home in the Universe by Stuart Kauffman

📖 Read pages 191 – 215 of At Home in the Universe by Stuart Kauffman

In chapter 9 Kauffman applies his NK landscape model to explain the evolution seen in the Cambrian explosion and the re-population following the Permian extinction. He then follows it up with some interesting discussion which applies it to technological innovation, learning curves, and growth in areas of economics. The chapter has given me a few thoughts on the shape and structure (or “landscape”) of mathematics. I’ll come back to this section to see if I can’t extend the analogy to come up with something unique in math.

The beginning of Chapter 10 he begins discussing power laws and covering the concept of emergence from ecosystems, coevolution, and the evolution of coevolution. In one part he evokes Adam Smith’s invisible hand which seemingly benefits everyone acting for its own selfishness. Though this seems to be the case since it was written, I do wonder what timescales and conditions it works under. As an example, selfishness on the individual, corporate, nation, and other higher levels may not necessarily be so positive with respect to potential issues like climate change which may drastically affect the landscape on and in which we live.

How to Write in Japanese – a guest post from jlptbootcamp | The Memrise Blog

Read How to Write in Japanese – a guest post from jlptbootcamp (The Memrise Blog)
If you are learning Japanese on Memrise, you have probably come across one of our most active and long standing contributors, jlptbootcamp. Other than adding and editing a good proportion of the wo…

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📖 On page 132 of 430 of Dealing with China by Henry M. Paulson, Jr.

📖 Read pages 115 – 132 of 430 of Dealing with China by Henry M. Paulson, Jr.

A somewhat interesting section on The Nature Conservancy in China, but described far too simply in my opinion. While there is some good general advice within the chapter, there aren’t nearly enough specifics that an executive trying to recreate this type of action could use it as a template. And somehow the banking portion seems to come front and center before the conservation portion.

Former head of Goldman Sachs and U.S. Treasury Secretary Henry M. Paulson , Jr. and the cover of his 2015 book Dealing with China
Former head of Goldman Sachs and U.S. Treasury Secretary Henry M. Paulson , Jr. and the cover of his 2015 book Dealing with China

The First Film Adaptation of Alice in Wonderland (1903) | Open Culture

Read The First Film Adaptation of Alice in Wonderland (1903) by Ted Mills (openculture.com)
Once lost, this eight minute, very damaged, but very delightful silent version of Alice in Wonderland was restored several years ago by the British Film Institute. It is the first film adaptation of the 1865 Lewis Carroll classic. And at the time, the original length of 12 minutes (eight are all that’s left) made it the longest film coming out of the nascent British film industry. After about a minute, the eye ignores the damage of the film, like the ear ignores a scratched 78 rpm record. Viewers can expect several vignettes from the novel, not a flowing narrative. It starts with Alice following the White Rabbit down the hole, the “eat me” and “drink me” sequence, the squealing baby that turns into a piglet, the Cheshire Cat, the Mad Tea Party, and the Red Queen and her playing card minions. The coloring of the negative is a BFI reconstruction of the original colors, by the way.
The film was produced and directed by Cecil Hepworth and Percy Stow out of their Hepworth Studios in Walton-on-the-Thames, near London. They show knowledge of the camera trickery pioneered only a few years earlier by Georges Méliès, like the shrinking and growing Alice and the appearance of the Cheshire Cat. That cat, by the way, was the Hepworth’s family pet. Hepworth himself plays the frog-headed footman, and his wife played the Red Queen. May Clark, who played Alice, was 18 at the time, and had already worked on several Hepworth productions, and not just acting. According to her bio at the Women Film Pioneers project, she did a bit of everything around the studio, “from special effects and set decoration to costume design and carpentry.” The early days of film have a real “student project” feel about them, no pigeonholed roles, just everybody chipping in. As for Cecil Hepworth, he appeared destined for a career in film, as his father ran magic lantern shows. Cecil worked for several companies before setting up his own and wrote one of the first books on the subject, Animated Photography: The ABC of the Cinematograph. His company continued to make films in this early style through 1926, but eventually ran out of money. To pay off debts, the receivership company melted down his films to get the silver, which was the reason most scholars thought his films were lost. In 2008, one of his films was discovered, and then “Alice.” There may still be others out there. You can find Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland in our collection, 800 Free eBooks for iPad, Kindle & Other Devices. And the 1903 film listed in our other collection, 1,150 Free Movies Online: Great Classics, Indies, Noir, Westerns, etc.. Ted Mills is a freelance writer on the arts who currently hosts the FunkZone Podcast. You can also follow him on Twitter at @tedmills, read his other arts writing at tedmills.com and/or watch his films here.

The Map of Mathematics: Animation Shows How All the Different Fields in Math Fit Together | Open Culture

Read The Map of Mathematics: Animation Shows How All the Different Fields in Math Fit Together Open Culture (openculture.com)

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George Harrison Explains Why Everyone Should Play the Ukulele, With Words and Music | Open Culture

Read George Harrison Explains Why Everyone Should Play the Ukulele, With Words and Music Open Culture (openculture.com)

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Betsy DeVos’s confirmation is suddenly on thin ice. Her defeat would be almost unprecedented. | The Washington Post

Read Betsy DeVos’s confirmation is suddenly on thin ice. Her defeat would be almost unprecedented. by Aaron Blake (Washington Post)
The last time a president who had a Senate majority saw his Cabinet nominee defeated: 1925.

Sadly I’ve just heard that she was confirmed… blech.
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Lost Bob Marley Tapes Are Restored After 40 Years in a Basement | The New York Times

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The recordings, of concerts between 1974 and 1978, were found badly damaged in a London hotel and painstakingly restored.

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How Sean Spicer Wins by Losing | POLITICO Magazine

Read How Sean Spicer Wins by Losing (POLITICO Magazine)
He's only broadcast from the White House briefing room three times, but on each occasion presidential press secretary Sean Spicer has been asked to do the impossible.

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This Senator Is Hell-Bent on Getting Out the Truth About Trump and Russia | Mother Jones

Read This senator is hell-bent on getting out the truth about Trump and Russia (Mother Jones)
Oregon Democrat Ron Wyden says the Obama administration should have released more information before the election.

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