🎧 This Week in Tech 654 Bye, Bye Mr. Ajit Pai | TWiT.TV

Listened to This Week in Tech 654 Bye, Bye Mr. Ajit Pai by Leo Laporte from TWiT.tv
News publishers violated copyright by embedding a tweet. Are video games to blame for the Florida school shooting? A drone causes a helicopter to crash. Are we seeing the end of Facebook? Apple isn't making as much money on the HomePod compared to other products. The controversial Snapchat update. What to expect from Mobile World Congress. An amazing $300M deal for a showrunner at Netflix, and more.

Owen was spot on in a lot of his assessment in this episode. His advice on raising kids is very sharp here.

The discussion of the Netflix deal was a bit shallow. I suspect the massive multi-million dollar deal had some serious performance pegs set into it, otherwise it doesn’t pay out as richly. It’s remniscent of some of Leo Laporte’s recent coverage of Casey Neistat’s deal unwinding at CNN. While it was a multi-million dollar deal, there were performance thresholds pegged in which he didn’t perform, so he ended up with relatively little in the process. The bigger issue in that case was that it appeared that neither CNN or Neistat had any solid idea of what he would be doing at CNN before entering the deal. I highly suspect this isn’t the case in Ryan Murphy’s situation, though he may have some material that is tied up in prior deals which may hobble him moving forward. Cases when major creatives/producers have moved from one home to another don’t always do well however.

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🎧 This Week in Google 444 The Fritter Critter | TWiT.TV

Listened to This Week in Google 444 The Fritter Critter by Leo Laporte, Jeff Jarvis, Stacey Higginbotham, Kevin Marks from TWiT.tv
Google brings AMP to email, smart replies to messages, ad blocking to Chrome, and warnings to insecure websites. Cryptocurrency mining comes to Salon and 4200 other sites. Pixel Visual Core comes to Facebook and Snapchat, but not Google Camera. Logan Paul off YouTube - for now. Facebook loses the youngs. • Kevin's Stuff: Beaker Browser and Fritter • Jeff's Number: 280 character wedding vows • Stacey's Thing: Mango Mirror

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🎧 The Daily: An Endless War | The New York Times

Listened to Listen to ‘The Daily’: An Endless War by Michael Barbaro from nytimes.com
Four American soldiers were ambushed by militants in a remote desert in Niger in October. It was all part of a shadowy war going back to the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001.

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🎧 The Daily: The Russia Indictment, and the Trump Response | The New York Times

Listened to Listen to ‘The Daily’: The Russia Indictment, and the Trump Response by Michael Barbaro from nytimes.com
The special counsel’s charges against 13 Russians reveal a sophisticated plot to turn Americans against one another — one that seems to still be working.

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🎧 The Daily: The Gun Behind So Many Mass Shootings | The New York Times

Listened to Listen to ‘The Daily’: The Gun Behind So Many Mass Shootings by Michael Barbaro from nytimes.com
The AR-15 assault rifle used in Parkland, Fla., this week was purchased legally, officials said. How did a weapon designed for warfare become easier to buy than a handgun?

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🎧 Mike Solomonov | The Atlantic Interview

Listened to Mike Solomonov by Jeffrey Goldberg from The Atlantic Interview
Israeli chef Mike Solomonov recently won the James Beard Award for outstanding chef. He created the restaurant Zahav in Philadelphia, built a food empire, and expertly hid a drug addiction from everyone in his life. He talks with Jeffrey Goldberg, the Atlantic's editor in chief, about what he felt when his brother was killed, and how the tragedy first fueled and then helped him fight his addiction. Now in a long recovery, he cooks Israeli food as a kind of cultural mission.

A very interesting human story hiding behind a food “celebrity”. We definitely need more people like this in our culture helping to diversify interesting things in our lives.

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🎧 The Daily: Trump’s Immigration Plan | The New York Times

Listened to Listen to ‘The Daily’: Trump’s Immigration Plan by Michael Barbaro from nytimes.com
The president wants merit-based migration. But what counts as merit? We also report on the shooting at a Florida school in which at least 17 people died.

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🎧 Mollie Hemingway | The Atlantic Interview

Listened to Mollie Hemingway by Jeffrey Goldberg from The Atlantic Interview
Mollie Hemingway, a senior editor for the Federalist and Fox News contributor, finds most of the media's histrionics over President Donald Trump to be overblown. While she won't let her kids listen to the president's most vulgar remarks, she's willing to defend his policies and his record, a fact which has cost her some friends. She talks to Jeffrey Goldberg, the Atlantic's editor in chief, about where she finds Trump most effective, and what his successes mean for American politics.

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🎧 Episode 21: We Don’t Need No Education | The Remnant

Listened to Episode 21: We Don’t Need No Education by Jonah Goldberg from The Remnant | National Review
Bryan Caplan joins The Remnant to discuss his latest book, The Case Against Education.

Some interesting thought about education in America. There are some simple take aways from this, but there’s also some very complex interactions that may not be quite as easy to tease solutions out of the data. Bookmarking some of Bryan Caplan’s work to read in the future.

It wasn’t mentioned in the episode, but this reminds me of one of the other major problems in American education compared with other countries. In many countries in the early high school years children make a choice to train for a trade versus to continue education to go to college.

🎧 Tracy Chou | The Atlantic Interview

Listened to Tracy Chou by Jeffrey Goldberg from The Atlantic Interview
The Atlantic's editor in chief Jeffrey Goldberg revisits a persistent problem in the tech industry: Why is it so difficult for people who aren't white and male? He talks with Tracy Chou, an engineer and long-time veteran of the start-up world whose current work focuses on that problem. She discusses her own experiences with harassment and discrimination, and why those experiences didn't drive her out of tech, as they did for many others.

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🎧 Robert Siegel | The Atlantic Interview

Listened to Robert Siegel by Jeffrey Goldberg from The Atlantic Interview
For thirty years, Robert Siegel has given us the afternoon news. Having started his career in public radio when it was a scrappy enterprise, he's spent the past three decades shaping NPR as host of All Things Considered. He retired this week, at a time when NPR plays a critical role in educating the electorate. Jeffrey Goldberg, Atlantic’s editor in chief, turns the microphone on Robert Siegel for a change.

Wherein Jeffrey Goldberg right properly suckers Robert Siegel into recording bumpers and intros for his new podcast. Siegel gives an interesting interview the day after he leaves NPR, though I hope that he get’s re-interviewed again when he’s “old” and doesn’t care anymore.

One of my favorite parts of these podcasts are the somewhat snarky bumpers Jeffrey Goldberg puts onto the the end encouraging people to give reviews and subscribe. I kind of wish he’d let loose a bit more and inject some of this kind of snark into the interviews too.

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🎧 Eric Garcetti | The Atlantic Interview

Listened to Eric Garcetti by Jeffrey Goldberg from The Atlantic Interview
The Atlantic's editor in chief Jeffrey Goldberg talks with Mayor Eric Garcetti about what people misunderstand about Los Angeles, whether a mayor could win the presidency, and where he goes to find the best tacos.

There was an interesting question about the difference between Mexican and Mexican-Americans protesting/marching and Irish-American immigrants celebrating events like St. Patrick’s day. While these seem to be drastically different to mainstream Americans now, the primary difference between the two is over 100 years of the change of perception. Not many will easily recall the harsh history and racial slurs that Irish immigrants endured over a century ago and even fewer will appreciate the racial differences from that time period in which the Irish were also not considered “white”. It’s amazing the difference a hundred years of progress and change will effect. If only we could learn from the past and be a lot more open-minded.

I also really appreciate the subtle response about Los Angeles having experienced its own “Ferguson moment” over a decade ago with the Rodney King and other race-related riots, but that we experienced them without the benefit (or maybe harm) of social media amplifying them.

This episode had an odd audio effect that made Garcetti sound a bit “far away”. Perhaps it was potting him up/down between questions that created the problem? Either way, a small blip in an otherwise solidly produced podcast.

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🎧 Jonah Goldberg | The Atlantic Interview

Listened to Jonah Goldberg by Jeffrey Goldberg from The Atlantic Interview
Writer Jonah Goldberg talks with The Atlantic's editor in chief Jeffrey Goldberg about being a conservative without a party in the age of Donald Trump. Jonah says there are many factors contributing to the dysfunction and paralysis in the Republican Party, and that thinkers and leaders on the right may have a very small window to fix these problems before the party disintegrates. Jeffrey and Jonah also discuss the experience of waiting in television green rooms.

Maybe I’m reading to or listening to all the wrong sources because I feel like I’m missing candid and open discussions like this one. Here Jonah Goldberg does an excellent job of discussing many of the unspoken problems within the Republican party right now. I wish there was more reporting on issues like these, though the problem is the way people providing their opinions are being vilified by some at the far right of what we used to know as the Republican party.

I’ll have to sample a bit of Jonah Goldberg’s podcast The Remnant for some additional insight to what is happening here. The sad and painful title of the show gives me a good idea of what I might expect.

Game theory gives me some hope that a centrist party may come out of the ashes of the 2016 election to provide some better pragmatic leadership.

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🎧 Richard Plepler | The Atlantic Interview

Listened to Richard Plepler by Jeffrey Goldberg from The Atlantic Interview
The chairman and CEO of HBO talks with The Atlantic's editor in chief Jeffrey Goldberg about what shows he should watch next. They also discuss how HBO has tried to develop a healthy company culture within a highly sexualized industry, the high-stakes business of making great TV, and what happened at the end of the Sopranos.

I feel like the first 5 minutes of the interview were missing. Compared to others in the series, this particular episode was awfully bland. I suspect it’s the case that CEOs rarely ever make good interviews because they’re generally hamstrung in what they can and can’t say in settings like these.

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🎧 Jake Tapper | The Atlantic Interview

Listened to Jake Tapper by Jeffrey Goldberg from The Atlantic Interview
The Atlantic's editor in chief Jeffrey Goldberg talks with the CNN anchor Jake Tapper about learning from mistakes in journalism, watching the media destroy someone you know, and what President Trump is getting right.

Transcript

Some interesting insight on Tapper’s sense of fairness here. I appreciate the level of comfort between the two participants here and it’s interesting to hear about their personal relationship a bit as context as well. My favorite part was the revelation of Tapper’s brief relationship with Monica Lewinsky and how he viewed her treatment in the media as a result of the experience. It certainly reminds us all that the world needs more humanizing instead of less.

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