📺 The Daily Show with Trevor Noah: February 16, 2017

Watched The Daily Show with Trevor Noah: February 16, 2017 from Comedy Central
President Trump holds a turbulent press conference, Jordan Klepper talks to New Jersey residents living on Dick Street, and Ezra Edelman discusses "O.J.: Made in America."

The opening five minutes was about as compact as you could make the craziness of today’s press conference. Holy Crap!

📺 The Daily Show with Trevor Noah: February 15, 2017

Watched The Daily Show with Trevor Noah: February 15, 2017 from Comedy Central
Trevor reflects on having a president with grandpa tendencies, Donald Trump weighs in on the Israel-Palestine conflict, and Mark Mazzetti discusses Russia's election hacking.

The Trump “Old Guy” opener was about as good as it gets for political satire lately.

The capper: http://maketrumptweetseightagain.com/

📺 The Daily Show with Trevor Noah: February 14, 2017

Watched The Daily Show with Trevor Noah: February 14, 2017 by Trevor Noah from Comedy Central
National Security Adviser Michael Flynn resigns and Republicans don't know how to handle questions about it, and Laverne Cox discusses the TV show "Doubt."

“That guy gets so much poutine.” -Trevor Noah on Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s good looks.

The Mike Flynn “cartoon” was an interesting method of storytelling.

There was a nice portion just before the interview in which Noah shows several examples of the ways in which the Trump administration tries to have things both ways, and then denies that they’re not telling the truth. Why must they waffle? Why can’t they just stand up and say “this is who we are.” We couldn’t do anything but respect them for that, but lying just ruins it all.

A map of Russia on the episode makes me wonder why I haven’t seen any pundits or comedians take the map and turn Russia’s highlight into Trump’s hair and then superimpose his face over South Asia. This image may help others with the idea:

📺 The Daily Show with Trevor Noah: February 13, 2017

Watched The Daily Show with Trevor Noah: February 13, 2017 from Comedy Central
President Trump meets with Japan's Shinzo Abe, Trevor profiles Trump's senior adviser Stephen Miller, and Elaine Welteroth and Phillip Picardi discuss Teen Vogue.

Interesting to see what’s happening at Teen Vogue. The Stephen Miller portion actually went pretty easy on his performance on the Sunday Morning shows this week. Not quite as funny as most episodes, but still interesting and relevant within the overall political environment.

The “Moment of Zen” at the end with Trump shaking hands with Abe was truly hilarious.

📺 "Suits" Admission of Guilt, S6 E14

Watched "Suits" Admission of Guilt, S6 E14 from USA Network, 15 February 2017
Directed by Michael Smith. With Gabriel Macht, Patrick J. Adams, Rick Hoffman, Meghan Markle. Harvey and Mike walk a fine line when they partner on a class action. Louis needs Rachel's help impressing a client during an annual presentation. And Donna and Benjamin refine their product.

📺 PBS NewsHour full episode Feb. 16, 2017

Watched PBS NewsHour full episode Feb. 16, 2017 from PBS NewsHour
Thursday on the NewsHour, President Trump takes on charges of Russian connections, the news media and a new immigration order in an animated and wide-ranging news conference. Also: What’s causing more white Americans to die in middle age, sanctuary cities take a stand against the president's immigration policies and an English professor's take on her own life as an immigrant.

Most media accounts took today’s pressy to serious task. The coverage here took as measured take on the event as could be humanly imagined–I can’t imagine how they maintained straight faces based on the portions of the press conference they showed here or other places.

📺 The Daily Show with Trevor Noah: February 9, 2017 – Laura Jane Grace

Watched The Daily Show, S2 E63 from Comedy Central, February 9, 2017
The Trump family is accused of using the White House for financial gain, Roy Wood Jr. prepares for Fashion Week and the Grammys, and Laura Jane Grace discusses "Tranny."

📺 "Suits" Teeth, Nose, Teeth, S6 E13

Watched "Suits" Teeth, Nose, Teeth, S6 E13 from USA Network, 8 February 2017
Directed by Silver Tree. With Gabriel Macht, Patrick J. Adams, Rick Hoffman, Meghan Markle. Rachel receives a letter that creates an unexpected issue for Harvey and Louis. Mike's mentorship of Oliver and Marissa gets put to the test. And Donna gets a surprise from the IT department.

📺 “Armenia Second (Alternative First) | An Introductory Video For Donald Trump” on YouTube

Watched Armenia Second (Alternative First) | An Introductory Video For Donald Trump from YouTube
Here is Armenia's introductory video for Donald J. Trump. Netherland and other European countries might think that they are the best choice for the second greatest country after the US. But we in Armenia think otherwise. ArmComedy is a satiric news show on Armenian television. #everysecondcounts http://www.everysecondcounts.eu Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/armcomedy Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/armcomedy Voice-over: Narek Margaryan

James Bond Henchmen Part 3: Geoffrey Holder | No Small Parts, Episode #11

Watched James Bond Henchmen Part 3: Geoffrey Holder from No Small Parts, Episode #11 | YouTube
Perhaps best known for his role as Baron Samedi in Live and Let Die, Geoffrey Holder had a long and prosperous career in the arts as a dancer, dance choreographer, actor, singer, costume designer, painter, sculptor, and so much more.

Watching the 2014 version of Annie earlier this evening reminded me of Geoffrey Holder and how much I loved his character Punjab in the 1982 version. He had a tremendous body of work which is touched upon in this great short retrospective.

🎞 Pompeii (TriStar, 2014)

Watched Pompeii from TriStar, 2014
Directed by Paul W.S. Anderson. With Kit Harington, Emily Browning, Kiefer Sutherland, Adewale Akinnuoye-Agbaje. A slave-turned-gladiator finds himself in a race against time to save his true love, who has been betrothed to a corrupt Roman Senator. As Mount Vesuvius erupts, he must fight to save his beloved as Pompeii crumbles around him.

Probably interesting in 3D when it came out, but ultimately just a somewhat interesting disaster picture. It had a little bit of heart, but has a plot as completely predictable as the historical one we already knew was coming. Some reasonable special effects, but mediocre looking in high def on television.

📺 Divided States of America, Part 2 | Frontline

Watched Divided States of America, Part 2 from FRONTLINE | PBS, aired January 18, 2017
FRONTLINE investigates the partisanship of the Obama era, and the polarized America that Donald Trump inherits as president.

The second part of this wasn’t as fraught as the first half, but both are simply scintillating and well worth watching.

📺 Divided States of America, Part 1 | Frontline

Watched Divided States of America, Part 1 from FRONTLINE | PBS, aired January 17, 2017
FRONTLINE investigates the partisanship of the Obama era, and the polarized America that Donald Trump inherits as president.

Ahead of Donald Trump's inauguration, "Divided States of America" looks back at events during President Barack Obama's years in office that revealed deep divisions in our country. The documentary offers an in-depth view of the partisan gridlock in Washington, the rise of populist anger on both sides of the aisle, and the racial tensions that erupted throughout the country.

What a stunning overview of the last eight years of partisan politics. In particular I had forgotten about a lot of the rancor and racism stemming from the far right when Obama took office. This two part documentary does a terrific job of reminding us where we’ve all been and puts a lot of our current situation into perspective. The first part here was particularly brutal in its coverage. It seems almost too balanced to the point that the subtext of the documentary is that politicians need to find a better way to get along to do more good for their constituents.

PBS NewsHour full episode Feb. 7, 2017

Watched PBS NewsHour full episode Feb. 7, 2017 from PBS NewsHour
Tuesday on the NewsHour, a federal appeals court takes up President Trump's controversial immigration order. Also: Fact-checking the claim that the press underreports terror attacks, shocking details of a Syrian prison, how Betsy DeVos could reshape education policy, unique challenges for black children with autism and a new take on Timothy McVeigh's motivation for the Oklahoma City bombing.

The segment on autism in combination with the episode of Invisibilia on mental health I heard last night make me think we should drastically change how we treat and deal with mental health in our society.

The worst shame in the segment on autism was that the family felt shame for taking their son out into public.

Nice to see some of our favorite folks from NPR Radio making the rounds on television.

The First Film Adaptation of Alice in Wonderland (1903) | Open Culture

Read The First Film Adaptation of Alice in Wonderland (1903) by Ted Mills (openculture.com)
Once lost, this eight minute, very damaged, but very delightful silent version of Alice in Wonderland was restored several years ago by the British Film Institute. It is the first film adaptation of the 1865 Lewis Carroll classic. And at the time, the original length of 12 minutes (eight are all that’s left) made it the longest film coming out of the nascent British film industry. After about a minute, the eye ignores the damage of the film, like the ear ignores a scratched 78 rpm record. Viewers can expect several vignettes from the novel, not a flowing narrative. It starts with Alice following the White Rabbit down the hole, the “eat me” and “drink me” sequence, the squealing baby that turns into a piglet, the Cheshire Cat, the Mad Tea Party, and the Red Queen and her playing card minions. The coloring of the negative is a BFI reconstruction of the original colors, by the way.
The film was produced and directed by Cecil Hepworth and Percy Stow out of their Hepworth Studios in Walton-on-the-Thames, near London. They show knowledge of the camera trickery pioneered only a few years earlier by Georges Méliès, like the shrinking and growing Alice and the appearance of the Cheshire Cat. That cat, by the way, was the Hepworth’s family pet. Hepworth himself plays the frog-headed footman, and his wife played the Red Queen. May Clark, who played Alice, was 18 at the time, and had already worked on several Hepworth productions, and not just acting. According to her bio at the Women Film Pioneers project, she did a bit of everything around the studio, “from special effects and set decoration to costume design and carpentry.” The early days of film have a real “student project” feel about them, no pigeonholed roles, just everybody chipping in. As for Cecil Hepworth, he appeared destined for a career in film, as his father ran magic lantern shows. Cecil worked for several companies before setting up his own and wrote one of the first books on the subject, Animated Photography: The ABC of the Cinematograph. His company continued to make films in this early style through 1926, but eventually ran out of money. To pay off debts, the receivership company melted down his films to get the silver, which was the reason most scholars thought his films were lost. In 2008, one of his films was discovered, and then “Alice.” There may still be others out there. You can find Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland in our collection, 800 Free eBooks for iPad, Kindle & Other Devices. And the 1903 film listed in our other collection, 1,150 Free Movies Online: Great Classics, Indies, Noir, Westerns, etc.. Ted Mills is a freelance writer on the arts who currently hosts the FunkZone Podcast. You can also follow him on Twitter at @tedmills, read his other arts writing at tedmills.com and/or watch his films here.