👓 This tool lets you find the Confederate monument closest to you | Quartz

Read Search for the Confederate monument closest to you by Christopher Groskopf, David Yanofsky, and Youyou Zhou (Quartz)
Is a statue of Robert E. Lee lurking in your neighborhood? Statues, memorials and even schools are named in honor of the General who fought and failed to win independence in the US Civil War. According to the Southern Poverty Law Center, there are more than 1,500 symbols of the Confederacy in public spaces across America, Lee included.

👓 “The Monuments Must Go”: An Open Letter From the Great-Great-Grandsons of Stonewall Jackson | Slate

Read The Monuments Must Go (Slate)
An open letter from the great-great-grandsons of Stonewall Jackson.

👓 Scripting News: August 17, 2017

Read Scripting News: August 17, 2017 by Dave Winer (Scripting News)
Another shift happened a few years ago, when I decided it was okay to develop just for myself, with no intention of ever releasing the stuff I was working on. That led to a new style of product, and a happier developer. I was always doing it for myself, and fooling myself into believing it was for other people. I'm no less a narcissist than anyone else. Once you own that, you get a lot more powerful, I have found.

A great advertisement for selfdogfooding.

👓 Owning my Online Reading Status Updates | Boffo Socko

Read Owning my Online Reading Status Updates by Chris AldrichChris Aldrich (BoffoSocko)
As of October 30, 2016, I’ve slowly but surely begun posting what I’m actively reading online to my blog. I’ve refined the process a bit in the last couple of weeks, and am becoming relatively happy with the overall output. For those interested, below is the general process/workflow I’m usi...

👓 Change Your Crappy Twitter Handle Without Losing Followers | Wired

Read Change Your Crappy Twitter Handle Without Losing Followers by Liana Bandziulis (Wired)
SO YOU WANT to change your Twitter handle. When you got it two years ago, @PlankingGuy was funny, but today you get quizzical looks. @SexxyFoxxyMama was okay in college, but not on your new business cards. Or you realized @ERMAHGERD520 was a bit too hard for people to spell after all. You could just get a new account, but reacquiring your Following would be a pain, and you’d lose all your tweets. Luckily, it’s very easy to update your handle. From your page, find the gear icon at the top right, click Settings, and it’ll be the first text box you encounter, labeled “Username.” If your new name is available, you can change it, and instantly you will be @NewName, without losing a single follower.

h/t Jeremy Cherfas

👓 Why Mathematicians Like to Classify Things | Quanta Magazine

Read Why Mathematicians Like to Classify Things | Quanta Magazine by Kevin Hartnett (Quanta Magazine)
It’s “a definitive study for all time, like writing the final book,” says one researcher who’s mapping out new classes of geometric structures.

👓 What I believe II (ft. Sarah Constantin and Stacey Jeffery) | Shtetl-Optimized

Read What I believe II (ft. Sarah Constantin and Stacey Jeffery) (Shtetl-Optimized)
In my post “The Kolmogorov Option,” I tried to step back from current controversies, and use history to reflect on the broader question of how nerds should behave when their penchant for speaking unpopular truths collides head-on with their desire to be kind and decent and charitable, and to be judged as such by their culture. I was gratified to get positive feedback about this approach from men and women all over the ideological spectrum. However, a few people who I like and respect accused me of “dogwhistling.” They warned, in particular, that if I wouldn’t just come out and say what I thought about the James Damore Google memo thing, then people would assume the very worst—even though, of course, my friends themselves knew better. So in this post, I’ll come out and say what I think. But first, I’ll do something even better: I’ll hand the podium over to two friends, Sarah Constantin and Stacey Jeffery, both of whom were kind enough to email me detailed thoughts in response to my Kolmogorov post.

👓 U.S. vs. North Korea: The Winner? China | The American Prospect

Read U.S. vs. North Korea: The Winner? China by Robert Kuttner (The American Prospect)
China has no reason to restrain Kim too soon, or for too modest a price. I keep thinking of the October 1962 Cuban missile crisis. This terrifying episode was a very complicated game of diplomatic maneuvering and military posturing, with a thermonuclear exchange between the U.S. and the USSR as the consequence of a misstep. But that apocalyptic situation had one big advantage over the present one: John Kennedy, Nikita Khrushchev, and Fidel Castro were all sane, rational beings. The same cannot be said about the two protagonists to the Korea crisis, Donald Trump and Kim Jong-un. In Kim, Trump has met his match.

This is apparently the article that began Bannon’s ouster from the administration.

👓 Why We Terminated Daily Stormer | Cloudflare

Read Why We Terminated Daily Stormer by Matthew Prince (Cloudflare)
Earlier today, Cloudflare terminated the account of the Daily Stormer. We've stopped proxying their traffic and stopped answering DNS requests for their sites. We've taken measures to ensure that they cannot sign up for Cloudflare's services ever again. Our terms of service reserve the right for us to terminate users of our network at our sole discretion. The tipping point for us making this decision was that the team behind Daily Stormer made the claim that we were secretly supporters of their ideology. Our team has been thorough and have had thoughtful discussions for years about what the right policy was on censoring. Like a lot of people, we’ve felt angry at these hateful people for a long time but we have followed the law and remained content neutral as a network. We could not remain neutral after these claims of secret support by Cloudflare. Now, having made that decision, let me explain why it's so dangerous.

Some interesting implications for how the internet works as a result of this piece.

👓 Steve Bannon thought he wasn’t giving an interview | Axios

Read Steve Bannon thought he wasn't giving an interview by Jonathan Swan (Axios)
Steve Bannon's White House colleagues can't believe what they're reading tonight — and here's the twist: neither can Bannon. The White House chief strategist has told associates he never intended to do an "interview" with an editor at the American Prospect, a left-wing publication. Bannon has told associates that he admired the author's stance on China, and so called the journalist, Robert Kuttner, on Tuesday, to discuss his piece. Apparently Bannon never thought that the journalist might take his (very newsworthy) comments and turn them into a story. It's Anthony Scaramucci all over again (minus the curse words.) The result is not good for Bannon, who is already under pressure, with colleagues lined up against him and a president who agrees with him ideologically but tells associates he thinks Bannon is a leaker.

👓 White nationalists are flocking to genetic ancestry tests — but many don’t like their results | Stat News

Read White nationalists are flocking to genetic ancestry tests. Some don’t like what they find by Eric Boodman (Stat News)
It was a strange moment of triumph against racism: The gun-slinging white supremacist Craig Cobb, dressed up for daytime TV in a dark suit and red tie, hearing that his DNA testing revealed his ancestry to be only “86 percent European, and … 14 percent Sub-Saharan African.” The studio audience whooped and laughed and cheered. And Cobb — who was, in 2013, charged with terrorizing people while trying to create an all-white enclave in North Dakota — reacted like a sore loser in the schoolyard. “Wait a minute, wait a minute, hold on, just wait a minute,” he said, trying to put on an all-knowing smile. “This is called statistical noise.”

👓 The Friendliest Lawsuit Ever Filed Against the Justice Department | Law Fare Blog

Read The Friendliest Lawsuit Ever Filed Against the Justice Department by Benjamin Wittes (LawFare)
In February, speaking before a joint session of Congress, President Trump declared that: “according to data provided by the Department of Justice, the vast majority of individuals convicted of terrorism and terrorism-related offenses since 9/11 came here from outside of our country.” There's a lot of reason to believe this statement is a compound lie—both to believe that the vast majority of individuals convicted of terrorism-related crimes did not come here from elsewhere and to believe that the career men and women of the Department of Justice did not provide any data suggesting otherwise.

👓 How the design firm behind the Xbox built the bike of the future | The Verge

Read How the design firm behind the Xbox built the bike of the future by David Pierce (The Verge)
"We wanted you to be able to take the bike and go with how the city moves." Teague was enlisted to design a new kind of bike by Oregon Manifest, a non-profit dedicated to making the world think differently about bikes. Its Bike Design Project gave firms in five cities the opportunity to build a bike made with their city in mind; the public then voted on the winner, which will enter a limited production run from Fuji Bikes. The New York City bike had a USB phone charger built in; The Evo, from San Francisco, was all about modular storage. Chicago's Blackline bike was a rugged pothole-conquerer of a bike, and Portland's PDX came with an app to personalize the ride just for you. For every different city, a different bike. But the voters picked Seattle. They picked Denny, the bike Jackson and the team at Teague designed with Sizemore Bicycles, a custom-bike maker in the city.

👓 Culling Apps Because of the iPad by Jack Baty

Read Culling Apps Because of the iPad by Jack Baty (www.baty.blog)
This means that in order to work easily in both desktop and mobile environments, I must rely on apps that work well in both. Taking that further, it means that I want to use the same app everywhere. My love for plain text files remains. It’s great being able to edit my files using any number of Dropbox-compatible apps, but using one app to edit Markdown on the Mac and a different one on iOS is beginning to feel like overhead I don’t need. The drawback here, and it’s a big one, is that I may need to abandon some of my favorite things. At least the ones I live in, now that I live in different places.

Having relatively uniform tools across computing modalities certainly has something to say for itself.