Replied to a tweet (Twitter)
I've always loved OPML subscription: you follow an OPML source that automatically updates your feed over time. Sadly @inoreader is one of the few apps that supports it.
Replied to a tweet by Sara SoueidanSara Soueidan (Twitter)
RSS is such a great topic. I can't wait to see what your perspective is on it. One of my favorite resources is the IndieWeb wiki page for RSS as it's got some good pros/cons, alternate methods for feeds that don't require side files, conversion tools, and miscellanea. I've always loved the way that platforms…
Replied to Making RSS more visible again with a /feeds page by Marcus HerrmannMarcus Herrmann (marcus.io)
A few years ago you could easily tell if a page offered an RSS feed. Browsers (at least good ones) had a feed symbol close to their location bar, and if you were really lucky (or used a really good browser), that indicator was even a button, empowering you to subscribe to a website with only one cli...
The overall idea to make it easier to subscribe to a personal website is certainly a laudable one. Sadly the general concept presented here, while it sounds potentially useful, is far too little and misdirected. Hopefully better potential solutions are still not too late. First, let's step back a moment. The bigger problem with feeds…

Colophon

This site is Built with WordPress primarily using HTML with Microformats, CSS, and JavaScript. Theme Using IndieWeb Twenty Fifteen an IndieWeb friendly fork of the standard Twenty Fifteen Theme to which I've added some customization including better support for Microformats v2. Plugins (in rough order of use/value/importance to me; not all-inclusive) Micropub--for publishing quickly to…
Replied to a tweet by Carolina GilabertCarolina Gilabert (Twitter)
I'm enamored of Aaron Parecki's Monocle reader. I can subscribe to almost anything I want, read it without interfering algorithms, and reply to posts directly in the reader, which uses Micropub to post those directly on my site, which has Webmentions to send notifications to those sites in turn. I'm similarly in love with an…

Exploring Pine.blog

I'd noticed Pine.blog before at a previous IndieWebCamp, but not had time to delve into it very deeply. Seeing some of what Brian Schrader has been working on while following IndieWebCamp Austin remotely this weekend has reminded about the project. As a result, I've been spending some time tonight to check out some of the…
Bookmarked Twitter OPML Export by Luca HammerLuca Hammer (opml.glitch.me)
Get websites and RSS Feeds of the people you follow on Twitter. Import the OPML-file with your favorite feedreader.
I love nothing more than OPML related tools! I just finished exporting all of my YouTube subscriptions the other day, now I can get the RSS feeds from the websites of all the people I'm following on Twitter?! This is awesome. I'll need to work out how I might be able to import it all…
Today I exported all my YouTube subscriptions as an OPML file and imported them to my website's following page (aka blogroll). I still have a bit of clean up to do to categorize and present them all the way I'd like, but I've got a huge start on it. I'm hoping now that I've cut…
Replied to a thread on RSS and blogrolls by Andy Bell, Stuart Langridge, and Hidde (Twitter)
Blogrolls? Those are like Twitter lists for the cognoscenti right? ;) Seriously, I've resurrected mine a while back too. And included sub-sectioned OPML files just for kicks. More details on the project and implications for the future: https://boffosocko.com/2019/06/18/from-following-posts-and-blogrolls-following-pages-with-opml-to-microsub-servers-and-readers/  
Replied to Return of the blog roll by Hidde de Vries (hiddedevries.nl)
Personal blogs are making a comeback among web folks. I like this. I have even gone so far as to add a blog roll to this site, so that you can see which blogs I like to read (fwiw). Personal blogs FTW When I started getting interested in the web, about 15 years ago, blogs were how I learned new stuf...
It's great to see blogrolls slowly, but surely making a comeback! I've got one too. I'm curious if you provide an OPML file as well?
Replied to a tweet by Mathew IngramMathew Ingram (Twitter)
Discovery can definitely be a bear. Interestingly I came to your tweet through a handful of related blogposts via a feedreader from a random OPML file, so apologies for the late reply. I keep an old school blogroll, but it got so big I made it an entire page. It's split out by a few…
Read Feeds for journalists (leibniz.me)
This year started with a small project I really like: Feeds for Journalists, by Dave Winer. The idea is that RSS is still a valid technology to get an effective and unbiased flow of news. As he puts it, after reading a tweet by Mathew Ingram: If you’re a journalist a...
Found this while sifting through some OPML files.
Bookmarked Local News for Richmond & Wayne County, Indiana (Richmond & Wayne County, Indiana News)
Richmond, IN and Wayne County, Indiana news and headlines from local newspapers and other sources
This is a fascinating local news aggregator built by Chris Hardie. It's somewhat reminiscent of my own local news aggregation work, though mine is in the form of a less accessible OPML file of local news feeds that one could subscribe to in a feed reader. It certainly took more work for him to build,…
Replied to Networking as Time Saving by Jane Van GalenJane Van Galen (Teaching and Learning on the Open Web)

We talked in our group last week about the time that it requires to develop course websites and "open" assignments, and to make new tech function as it should when there may not be enough support, and when these sorts of investments may not be valued in faculty reviews.

I talked briefly about the "innovation" part is often simply building off the work of others, when so many faculty now share their work on the open web.

A great example of this just came through my Twitter feed.  I have a column set up in Tweetdeck  where I'm following the  conference.  With a Tweetdeck column, I can just glance or scroll for a minute between other things I'm doing,  to see if anything looks interesting.  People at this conference are working on open pedagogies, particularly via the Domains of Ones Own work we've talked about.  Most sessions are being live-tweeted, with a rich trove of links.

One attendee Chris Aldrich, has created a Twitter list of past attendees at the conference and others who do work related that that presented at this meeting.   I can skim this to find new people from whom to learn.  I can follow them and then, as I have time, check their Twitter feeds for updates on what they're doing.   If I don't find myself learning from these new follows, I just unfollow and move on.

And inevitably, over months and years, I'll find people who will generously invest in teaching me and others about the work they're doing, about why they're doing it, and about how that work is recieved by their students.

This is the open web I hope we're teaching our students about --  place of innovation, generosity, value-driven discourse and always, always, something new to learn. 

Thanks for the shout out! Making those kinds of lists can certainly be repetitive, time consuming, and thankless. The only thing worse is that hundreds or thousands should try to reinvent the same wheel.  If you appreciated that bit of trickery, you might better appreciate a more open web version of the same with respect…