🎧 Cold Open | The West Wing Weekly

Listened 0.00: Cold Open by Josh Malina and Hrishi Hirway from The West Wing Weekly
Introducing the West Wing Weekly.

A tad on the cheesy sounding side, but I’m addicted to the series, so what the heck, I’ll give it a spin.

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🎧 Gillmor Gang: Blank Check | TechCrunch

Listened Gillmor Gang: Blank Check by Doc Searls, Keith Teare, Frank Radice, Kevin Marks, and Steve Gillmor from TechCrunch
Doc checks AdTech’s pulse, Google poisons search with Fake News, and Social stews over trust.

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🎧 Gillmor Gang: Loose Change | TechCrunch

Listened Gillmor Gang: Loose Change by Michael Arrington, Keith Teare, Doc Searls, Kevin Marks, and Steve Gillmor from TechCrunch
Twitter ponders subscription services, Medium gets $5 from Steve and maybe Doc, Keith and Kevin offer their 2 cents from across the pond, and Mike holds down the fort from Crunchfund HQ.

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🎧 Gillmor Gang: Open and Shut | TechCrunch

Listened Gillmor Gang: Open and Shut by Robert Scoble, Keith Teare, Frank Radice, Kevin Marks, and Steve Gillmor from TechCrunch
This was the last recording of the Gillmor Gang in 2016, and the final minutes included a sharp exchange between Robert Scoble and myself. Subsequently Robert decided to stop appearing on the show. I wish him well and thank him for his participation over the years.

Last appearance of Robert Scoble??

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🎧 This Week in Google 438 Netzwerkdurchsetzungsgesetz | TWiT.TV

Listened This Week in Google 438 Netzwerkdurchsetzungsgesetz by Leo Laporte, Jeff Jarvis, Kevin Marks from TWiT.tv
Say farewell to Pixel C, YouTube on Alexa, and decency on YouTube. Say hello to Trump's big button, SWATing, and corporations as malevolent AIs. Google Images knows how you'll vote. Ads coming to Alexa. Amazon is not really going to buy Target, are they? Equifax gets off scot-free. Facebook's new Center for Deleting Content. Leo's Tool: What 3 Words: a new way to navigate Jeff's Number: Million Short: search links without the top million results Kevin's Stuff: IndieWeb, Homebrew Website Club, and Micro.blog

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🎧 This Week in Google 436 I Married a Stormtrooper | TWiT.TV

Listened This Week in Google 436 I Married a Stormtrooper by Leo Laporte, Jeff Jarvis, Stacey Higginbotham, Joan Donovan from TWiT.tv
Facebook's facial recognition software will alert you when someone posts a picture of you, even without being tagged. Snooze your friends. How to use meme wars to run for President. Google Maps has a 6 year lead on the competition. Google AI finds two new planets. Google kills Tango. Twitter hate crackdown. Republican "Net Neutrality" bill. Magic Leap reveals its AR headset. Amazon Echo Spot unboxing. Joan Donovan's Pick: Exploding the Phone Jeff's Number: Elon Musk Tweets His Phone Number Stacey's Thing: Wink+Sonos Leo's Tool: Amazon Echo Spot

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🎧 Gillmor Gang: Blocktrain | TechCrunch

Listened Gillmor Gang: Blocktrain by Doc Searls, Keith Teare, Kevin Marks, Denis Pombriant, and Steve Gillmor from TechCrunch
Recorded live Friday, November 3, 2017

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🎧 Feding people is easy | Eat This Podcast

Listened Feeding people is easy: A conversation with Colin Tudge by Jeremy Cherfas from Eat This Podcast
“Plenty of plants, not much meat and maximum variety.”

The best advice for a good diet I’ve ever heard. It’s a maxim devised by Colin Tudge, long before anything similar you may have heard from more recent writers. Tudge, more than anyone else I know, has consistently championed the idea that meat ought to be seen in a supporting role, rather than as the main attraction, a garnish, if you will.

Tudge has been thinking and writing about agriculture and food systems for a long time, and we’ve been friends for a long time too. In fact, it’s fair to say that knowing Colin has influenced my own thoughts about food and farming quite a bit. As far as Colin is concerned, we’ve been going about farming in completely the wrong way for the past 100 years or so. Instead of asking how can we grow more food, more cheaply, he thinks we should focus on what we need – good, wholesome food that doesn’t destroy the earth – and then ask how we can provide that for everybody.

He’s expanded and built on those ideas in many books since Future Cook (Future Food in the US), which contained that pithy dietary advice and which was published in 1980. And rather than reform or revolution, neither of which will do the job he thinks needs to be done, he advocates for a renaissance in real farming.

Subscribe: iTunes | Android | RSS | More
Support this podcast: on Patreon

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🎧 This Week in Google 435 Worst Queso Scenario | TWiT.TV

Listened This Week in Google 435 Worst Queso Scenario by Leo Laporte, Jeff Jarvis, Stacey Higginbotham from TWiT.tv
RIP Net Neutrality. Patreon listens to critics, scraps new fees. How to fix media. Facebook is unfixable. Google Home Max unboxing. "Appsperiments" is our new favorite word. Tweetstorms are officially Threads. Don't download that baby poop video. Stacey's Pick: Alexa, Turn on Christmas Jeff's Pick: Tasty One Top Leo's Pick: Silicon Valley's Worst Apologies of 2017

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🎧 This Week in Google 433 Move Fast and Break Everything | TWiT.TV

Listened This Week in Google 433 Move Fast and Break Everything by Stacey Higginbotham, Jason Howell, Mathew Ingram from TWiT.tv
Google FINALLY fixes their hamburger and beer emoji. Now they turn to the many fixes the Pixel 2 and Pixel 2 XL need. Android 8.1 adds support for Pixel 2's imaging chip. Lens rolling out to Google Assistant on Pixel phones. Uber withheld evidence in Waymo case. YouTube's creepy kids' shows. Jeff Bezos worth $100 Billion. Cyber Monday was Amazon's biggest shopping day ever. Andy Rubin leaves Essential. Stacey's Thing: Senso Bluetooth Headset Mathew's Stuff: Cryptocurrencies are neat. Jason's Tip: How to enable Pixel Visual Core Processing

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🎧 Modernist BreadCrumbs | Episode 6: Balls & Sticks | Heritage Radio Network

Listened Modernist BreadCrumbs | Episode 6: Balls & Sticks by Michael Harlan Turkell from Heritage Radio Network
This is Episode Six of Modernist BreadCrumbs: “Balls & Sticks,” on shapes, scoring, and semiotics.

Balls & sticks. You’ll hear this idiom over and over in this episode, as if we’re talking in circles. The two shapes’ repetitive figures have been a constant in bread’s identity over time, but why?

Modernist BreadCrumbs is a special collaborative podcast series with Heritage Radio Network and Modernist Cuisine, that takes a fresh look at one of the oldest staples of the human diet—bread. Although it may seem simple, bread is much more complex than you think.

From the microbes that power fermentation to the economics of growing grain, there’s a story behind every loaf. Each episode will reveal those stories and more, beginning with bread’s surprising and often complicated past, from the perspective of people who are passionate about bread, and shaping its future.

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🎧 Modernist BreadCrumbs | Episode 5: Against the Grain | Heritage Radio Network

Listened Modernist BreadCrumbs | Episode 5: Against the Grain by Michael Harlan Turkell from Heritage Radio Network
This is Episode Five of Modernist BreadCrumbs: “Against the Grain,” on politics.

How does bread play a part in politics you ask? Withholding grain has been part of party lines as well as a catalyst of war. Though the fight still continues to bring bread to those impoverished and underfed around the world, we urge you to chew on this: become as active as a sourdough starter, and be part of the bread revolution. Rise up!

Modernist BreadCrumbs is a special collaborative podcast series with Heritage Radio Network and Modernist Cuisine, that takes a fresh look at one of the oldest staples of the human diet—bread. Although it may seem simple, bread is much more complex than you think.

From the microbes that power fermentation to the economics of growing grain, there’s a story behind every loaf. Each episode will reveal those stories and more, beginning with bread’s surprising and often complicated past, from the perspective of people who are passionate about bread, and shaping its future.

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🎧 Modernist BreadCrumbs | Episode 7: Thermal Mass | Heritage Radio Network

Listened Modernist BreadCrumbs | Episode 7: Thermal Mass by Michael Harlan Turkell from Heritage Radio Network
This is Episode Seven of Modernist BreadCrumbs: “Thermal Mass,” on baking and ovens.

We’ll discuss “thermal mass,” or the ability to absorb and hold heat, in two-parts: within bread itself, and the ovens it’s baked in. It’s a complex physicochemical process… that’s more than just hot air.

Modernist BreadCrumbs is a special collaborative podcast series with Heritage Radio Network and Modernist Cuisine, that takes a fresh look at one of the oldest staples of the human diet—bread. Although it may seem simple, bread is much more complex than you think.

From the microbes that power fermentation to the economics of growing grain, there’s a story behind every loaf. Each episode will reveal those stories and more, beginning with bread’s surprising and often complicated past, from the perspective of people who are passionate about bread, and shaping its future.

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🎧 Modernist BreadCrumbs | Episode 4: Milling About | Heritage Radio Network

Listened Modernist BreadCrumbs | Episode 4: Milling About by Michael Harlan Turkell from Heritage Radio Network
This is Episode Four of Modernist BreadCrumbs: “Milling About,” History Part II, Pre-Industrialization.

When we look back on how modern baking came to be, it’s the same old story of craft informing art, and how the artisanal approach was replicated through the aid of mechanization. This episode picks up where Episode One left off, telling bread’s life story from All Purpose to Zopf.

Modernist BreadCrumbs is a special collaborative podcast series with Heritage Radio Network and Modernist Cuisine, that takes a fresh look at one of the oldest staples of the human diet—bread. Although it may seem simple, bread is much more complex than you think.

From the microbes that power fermentation to the economics of growing grain, there’s a story behind every loaf. Each episode will reveal those stories and more, beginning with bread’s surprising and often complicated past, from the perspective of people who are passionate about bread, and shaping its future.

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👓 Modernist BreadCrumbs | Episode 2: The Great Civilizations of Grain | Heritage Radio Network

Listened Modernist BreadCrumbs | Episode 2: The Great Civilizations of Grain by Michael Harlan Turkell from Heritage Radio Network
This is Episode Two of Modernist BreadCrumbs: “The Great Civilizations of Grain,” on grains, flour, and milling.

In this episode, we look inside with a kernel of knowledge, sprout ancient grains, and take a journey through wheat’s history. We could go on for flours.

Modernist BreadCrumbs is a special collaborative podcast series with Heritage Radio Network and Modernist Cuisine, that takes a fresh look at one of the oldest staples of the human diet—bread. Although it may seem simple, bread is much more complex than you think.

From the microbes that power fermentation to the economics of growing grain, there’s a story behind every loaf. Each episode will reveal those stories and more, beginning with bread’s surprising and often complicated past, from the perspective of people who are passionate about bread, and shaping its future.

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