🔖 IndieWeb Module for Drupal

Bookmarked IndieWeb Module for Drupal by Kristof De Jaeger (Drupal.org)
Integrates the philosophy of Indieweb in your Drupal website.
For more information about indieweb, see https://indieweb.org/.

Current functionality:
  • Receive webmentions and pingbacks via Webmention.io
  • Publish content etc via bridg.y, store syndications
  • Microformats for content and images
  • IndieAuth and Authentication API
  • Micropub for creating content etc
  • Creating comments from 'in-reply-to'
  • Microsub link exposing
This is only the tip of the iceberg and much more functionality will be added.
More extensive documentation is in the README file and on the configuration screens.

To install
  • composer require indieweb/mention-client in the root of your Drupal installation.
  • go to admin/modules and toggle 'Indieweb' to enable the module.
  • go to admin/config/services/indieweb and start configuring.
Currently development is happening on Github at https://github.com/swentel/indieweb and is synced back for bug fixes and releases. Create issues on Github.

This looks like a tremendous step forward for folks who want to join the IndieWeb via Drupal. Kudos to Kristof De Jaeger for some fantastic looking work.​​​​​​​​

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Following Taylor Jadin

Followed Taylor Jadin (jadin.me)
I am a Learning Technologies Specialist at St. Norbert College. I love when teaching and technology intersect.

tweet, post pictures to Instagram, and occasionally write code. I also like to ramble on the EdTech Magecast and the Jadin Approved podcast.

Ran across Taylor as a result of his work with Open Domains Lab via Twitter. I’m curious about his other work with DoOO.

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Following Heather Sears

Followed Researcher Developer – one way or another, I’m gonna get you… by Dr. Heather SearsDr. Heather Sears (heatherjsears.coventry.domains)
My focus in the Doctoral College & Centre for Research Capability and Development at Coventry University is doctoral training – providing leadership and coordination of training and development for postgraduate researchers.

I have responsibility for a new and innovative programme of development for all postgraduate researchers, alongside supporting the development and delivery of bespoke DTC programmes aligned to the Researcher Development Framework, business/industry-partner needs and the Concordat to Support the Career Development of Researchers.

Ran across her Twitter feed courtesy of #PressedConf18.

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❤️ hmvanderhart tweet My 3yrold thinks all people looking at their phone are reading poems.

Liked a tweet by Hannah VanderHart Hannah VanderHart (Twitter)

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👓 It’s Time For an RSS Revival | Wired

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This article, which I’ve seen shared almost too widely on the internet since it came out, could almost have been written any time in the past decade really. They did do a somewhat better job of getting quotes from some of the big feed readers’ leaders to help to differentiate their philosophical differences, but there wasn’t much else here. Admittedly they did have a short snippet about Dave Winer’s new feedbase product, which I suspect, in combination with the recent spate of articles about Facebook’s Cambridge Analytica scandal, motivated the article. (By the way, I love OPML as much as anyone could, but feedbase doesn’t even accept the OPML feeds out of my  core WordPress install though most feed readers do, which makes me wonder how successful feedbase might be in the long run without better legacy spec support.)

So what was missing from Wired’s coverage? More details on what has changed in the space in the past several years. There’s been a big movement afoot in the IndieWeb community which has been espousing a simpler and more DRY (don’t repeat yourself) version of feeds using simple semantic microformats markup like h-feed. There’s also been the emergence of JSON feed in the past year which many of the major feed readers already support.

On the front of people leaving Facebook (and their black box algorithmic monster that determines what you read rather than you making an implicit choice), they might have mentioned people who are looking for readers through which they can also use their own domains and websites where they own and maintain their own data for interaction. I’ve written about this in more depth last year: Feed reader revolution.

One of the more bleeding edge developments which I think is going to drastically change the landscape in the coming years for developers, feed readers, and the internet consumption space is the evolving Microsub spec which is being spearheaded by a group of projects known as the Aperture microsub server and the Together and Indigenous clients which already use it. Microsub is going to abstract away many of the technical hurdles that make it far more difficult to build a full-fledged feed reader. I have a feeling it’s going to level a lot of the playing field to allow a Cambrian explosion of readers and social related software to better leverage more easily reading content on the web without relying on third party black box services which people have been learning they cannot fully trust anymore. Aaron Parecki has done an excellent job of laying out some parts of it in Building an IndieWeb Reader as well as in recent episodes of his Percolator microcast. This lower hurdle is going to result in fewer people needing to rely solely on the biggest feed readers like Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram for both consuming content and posting their own content. The easier it becomes for people to use other readers to consume content from almost anywhere on the web, the less a monopoly the social networks will have on our lives.

I truly hope Wired circles around and gives some of these ideas additional follow up coverage in the coming months. They owe it to their readership to expand their coverage from what we all knew five years ago. If they want to go a step or two further, they might compare the web we had 15 years ago to some of the new and emerging open web technologies that are starting to take hold today.

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Following Matt Reed

Followed Confessions of a Community College Dean by Matt ReedMatt Reed (insidehighered.com)
In which a veteran of cultural studies seminars in the 1990s moves into academic administration and finds himself a married suburban father of two. Foucault, plus lawn care.

An interesting voice I’ve come across many times before. It’s time for an official follow.

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🔖 [1803.05316] Seven Sketches in Compositionality: An Invitation to Applied Category Theory

Bookmarked Seven Sketches in Compositionality: An Invitation to Applied Category Theory by Brendan Fong, David I. Spivak (arxiv.org)
This book is an invitation to discover advanced topics in category theory through concrete, real-world examples. It aims to give a tour: a gentle, quick introduction to guide later exploration. The tour takes place over seven sketches, each pairing an evocative application, such as databases, electric circuits, or dynamical systems, with the exploration of a categorical structure, such as adjoint functors, enriched categories, or toposes. No prior knowledge of category theory is assumed. [.pdf]

This is the textbook that John Carlos Baez is going to use for his online course in Applied Category Theory.

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👓 Why Tweet? | Confessions of a Community College Dean

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Some interesting and generally useful insight here. Sadly I didn’t see his Twitter handle attached to the post–at least on the mobile version. So much for the “promotion” accusation…

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🔖 [1803.09745] English verb regularization in books and tweets | arXiv

Bookmarked [1803.09745] English verb regularization in books and tweets by Tyler J. Gray, Andrew J. Reagan, Peter Sheridan Dodds, Christopher M. Danforth (arxiv.org)
The English language has evolved dramatically throughout its lifespan, to the extent that a modern speaker of Old English would be incomprehensible without translation. One concrete indicator of this process is the movement from irregular to regular (-ed) forms for the past tense of verbs. In this study we quantify the extent of verb regularization using two vastly disparate datasets: (1) Six years of published books scanned by Google (2003--2008), and (2) A decade of social media messages posted to Twitter (2008--2017). We find that the extent of verb regularization is greater on Twitter, taken as a whole, than in English Fiction books. Regularization is also greater for tweets geotagged in the United States relative to American English books, but the opposite is true for tweets geotagged in the United Kingdom relative to British English books. We also find interesting regional variations in regularization across counties in the United States. However, once differences in population are accounted for, we do not identify strong correlations with socio-demographic variables such as education or income. [.pdf]
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🔖 [1803.08823] A high-bias, low-variance introduction to Machine Learning for physicists | arXiv

Bookmarked A high-bias, low-variance introduction to Machine Learning for physicists by Pankaj Mehta, Marin Bukov, Ching-Hao Wang, Alexandre G.R. Day, Clint Richardson, Charles K. Fisher, David J. Schwab (arxiv.org)
Machine Learning (ML) is one of the most exciting and dynamic areas of modern research and application. The purpose of this review is to provide an introduction to the core concepts and tools of machine learning in a manner easily understood and intuitive to physicists. The review begins by covering fundamental concepts in ML and modern statistics such as the bias-variance tradeoff, overfitting, regularization, and generalization before moving on to more advanced topics in both supervised and unsupervised learning. Topics covered in the review include ensemble models, deep learning and neural networks, clustering and data visualization, energy-based models (including MaxEnt models and Restricted Boltzmann Machines), and variational methods. Throughout, we emphasize the many natural connections between ML and statistical physics. A notable aspect of the review is the use of Python notebooks to introduce modern ML/statistical packages to readers using physics-inspired datasets (the Ising Model and Monte-Carlo simulations of supersymmetric decays of proton-proton collisions). We conclude with an extended outlook discussing possible uses of machine learning for furthering our understanding of the physical world as well as open problems in ML where physicists maybe able to contribute. (Notebooks are available at this https URL )
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👓 Houses and Stairs | Mark Long

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I think I’ve actually read all of the articles that Mark quotes in this piece. I can’t say I could have ever tied them all together in the interesting and coherent way he does here, but it’s such a lovely little synthesis about the web.

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👓 Applied Category Theory – Online Course | John Carlos Baez

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Some awesome news just as I’ve wrapped up a class on Algebraic Geometry and was actively looking to delve into some category theory over the summer. John Carlos Baez announced that he’s going to offer an online course in applied category theory. He’s also already posted some videos and details!

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👓 MSU spent $500K in January to monitor social media accounts of Nassar victims, others | Lansing State Journal

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I can’t imagine that they even came close to getting $500K worth of value out of whatever this company produced for them.

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Following Paul Hibbitts

Followed Paul Hibbitts (Hibbitts Design)
Exploring and Building Open [Source] Software for Learning Ecosystems

Educator and interaction designer. Building #FOSS for distributed learning ecosystems/#DoOO/#OER. Using @getgrav + #CanvasLMS as open & collaborative platform.🚀

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