👓 Cast Update: Experimental JSON Feed Support | Cast App

Read Cast Update: Experimental JSON Feed Support by Julian Lepinski (Cast App)
A couple of weeks ago, Manton Reece and Brent Simmons announced JSON Feed, and I was immediately intrigued. Like a lot of software, much of Cast’s internal data is stored in JSON, and publishing JSON data directly would be pretty straightforward as a result.

<extremely valid json voice>

At any given time I’m usually in the middle of some huge, sprawling multi-month project to build Big New Features™ for Cast. I love this kind of work. Occasionally, however, I’ll treat myself and take a day off to work on something a little more bite-sized. There’s something very satisfying about starting and finishing something in the same day.

A couple of weeks ago, Manton Reece and Brent Simmons announced JSON Feed, and I was immediately intrigued. Like a lot of software, much of Cast’s internal data is stored in JSON, and publishing JSON data directly would be pretty straightforward as a result.

So I sunk my teeth in, and in about half a day I’d added experimental JSON Feed support to podcasts published with Cast.

Half a day. If you’re wondering whether JSON Feed publishing is straightforward to implement, that’s your answer right there.

I’ve also made some extensions to the JSON Feed spec to support some podcasting-specific things, which I’ve documented on the Cast JSON Feed Support page. The extensions add things like rss_url — which could be very helpful to crawlers and aggregator services to help correlate a specific JSON Feed against a specific RSS feed already in their database — and an array of participants on each episode to document who you’re hearing. I’ve also tried to be a good citizen about how this data is served out, if clients want to make use of ranged requests (from the Cast JSON Feed documentation):

Cast will sort feed items by their date_published field, in descending order, so clients making ranged requests will receive the most recent episodes published to a feed first. We also order the fields in the feed such that the items field will be the final field in the feed, meaning a client can assume they have seen all top-level fields once they reach the feed items.

As of last week, if you publish your podcast with Cast, we’ve started generating a JSON Feed for your podcast alongside your RSS feed. Change .xml to .json in your URL and you’re off to the races. It’s that easy.

All the regular experimental caveats apply — JSON Feed support is experimental, and could change (or disappear) at some point in future. We’re not yet seeing widespread client support for JSON Feed, but someone has to be the first in the pool to get this party started, and I’m happy for that to be Cast.

Source: Cast Update: Experimental JSON Feed Support – Cast App

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