Checked into Vito Restaurant
Rick’s birthday dinner with a gang of 13.

Watched Killer Inside: The Mind of Aaron Hernandez from Netflix

With Kevin Armstrong, Dan Wetzel, Patrick Haggan, Stephen Ziogas. What led to the murderous fall and shocking death of former NFL superstar Aaron Hernandez?

Episode 1: Aaron's arrest for the inexplicable murder of Odin Lloyd shocks the sports world, and his life and relationships before stardom are explored.

Episode 2: Red flags arise during the athlete's college days in Florida, but the NFL still comes calling. Aaron's relationship with a criminal comes into focus.

Episode 3: The spectacle of the first trial ends, and Aaron hires a celebrity lawyer for his second trial. Doctors study the impact of Aaron's concussions.

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Watched all three episodes, albeit a bit passively while reading and doing other things. Certainly an interesting story. There’s a lot more subtlety than I’d seen or heard during the original episode(s).
Replied to Jennifer Hall Lee: In Pasadena, the Fund-Raising for Schools Reflects the Income Inequality in Society by Diane RavitchDiane Ravitch (Diane Ravitch's blog)
Jennifer Hall Lee is a parent activist in Pasadena, California. She wrote this article about the different amounts of money available to different types of schools in Pasadena. Remember that one of…
It’s probably also worth noting that the Pasadena School district was one of the first in the country to begin busing in the early 70’s. This caused a dramatic split in the community and created a dramatic rise in the number of private schools here.

Private schools were not included in this new plan [busing], and because of that, people who didn’t agree with the plan — and could afford it — sent their kids to affluent private schools. This lead to around 30 private schools (currently 53) being present in the city of Pasadena.

Roxanne Elhachem, Colorado Boulevard.net

To my knowledge there are easily about 20 private elementary schools within Pasadena with tuitions beginning at $15,000 per year and going up as high as $40,000+/year. The wealth disparities within Pasadena are pulling so many students out of public schools and into private schools has also caused the city to begin significantly cutting back on budgets and closing/consolidating schools to stay solvent.