Replied to Should: The Wrong Foundation for Work (and Life) by Tracy DurnellTracy Durnell (Cascadia Inspired)
I’m a “should”-er. I “should” myself about my career, my relationships, my diet, my priorities. “Should” is insidious. It disrupts my hard-thought-through priorities to tell me I’m focused on the wrong goals. “Should” makes it hard to distinguish what I … Continue reading →
I’ve totally got this problem too. When it applies to my want to read book list I simply use the framing of an antilibrary.
 
I like the way you’ve framed it with the “should” idea. Another framing I’ve seen for this sort of philosophy is a more extreme “No ‘yes.’ Either ‘HELL YEAH!’ or ‘no’.” 
Replied to What I'm Excited About with Joining the Indie Web by Tracy DurnellTracy Durnell (Cascadia Inspired)
I've always been about having my own site instead of relying on companies, but the IndieWeb represents a new philosophy and approach to using the internet.
This just tickles me pink.

And now we’re going to have to nerd out on digital gardens and commonplace books too…

Listened to Behavioral Economics When Psychology and Economics Collide, Lecture 2: The Rise of Behavioral Economics from Great Courses
Grasp how behavioral economics uses methods from both economics and psychology to better understand biases and anomalies in decision making—factors that “rational choice” models don’t explain. Learn three core experimental principles of behavioral economics, and about Prospect Theory, which helps explain what human beings value.
8% done; Finished lecture 2
Still some overview and basic intro. Hope it picks up soon.
Read The Truth Behind A Viral Picture Of A Reopening School Is Worse Than It Looked (BuzzFeed News)
An alarming photo of a hallway crowded by mostly maskless students in a Georgia high school raises issues with reopening schools all around the country.
This depresses me to read. It’s even worse when I think that this high school is just 36 miles South of the high school I attended. The local schools’ and government’s lack of care for the students under their supervision is appalling. It’s even worse when I think of the people who were sent home or punished for what I would consider minor dress code “violations” when I attended and yet now they’re saying they can’t manage to make mask wearing mandatory. 
Read - Reading: The Mad Scientists' Club by Bertrand R. Brinley (Scholastic)
A strange sea monster appears on the lake ...a fortune is unearthed from an old cannon ...a valuable dinosaur egg is stolen. Watch out as the Mad Scientists turn Mammoth Falls upside down!
20% done

Read two chapters: The Strange Sea Monster of Strawberry Lake and The Unidentified Flying Man of Mammoth Falls

Listened to Behavioral Economics When Psychology and Economics Collide — Lecture 1: What Is a Good Decision? by Scott HuettelScott Huettel from The Great Courses
Begin by examining “rational choice” models of decision making from traditional economics, which assume consistent, foresighted, and self-interested decision makers. Then consider how this concept fails to explain many human decisions that appear counterintuitive or paradoxical. Identify two fundamental limitations that challenge our decision-making process.
4% done; Finished Lecture 1
Fairly facile introduction from my perspective. Didn’t learn anything new here.
Read Improve Your Remote Collaboration With P2 by Miguel LezamaMiguel Lezama (The WordPress.com Blog)
P2 powers internal collaboration at WordPress.com — and now it’s free for everyone. As more collaboration is happening remotely and online — work yes, but increasingly also school and persona…
It looks like Automattic is dusting off their old p2 / o2 theme projects for a new remote working platform? Here’s hoping that they consider Webmention support for true distributed cross-site @​mentions.
Read How would I improve RSS? Three ideas by Matt Webb (interconnected.org)
My sense is that RSS is having a mini resurgence. People are getting wary of the social media platforms and their rapacious appetite for data. We’re getting fatigued from notifications; our inboxes are overflowing. And people are saying that maybe, just maybe, RSS can help. So I’m seeing RSS being discussed more in 2020 than I have done for years. There are signs of life in the ecosystem.
Matt has got a good overview and some useful ideas and I like the direction he’s moving. There has been more work on not only RSS but other feeds and specs like Microsub in the past few years. The IndieWeb has moved the needle a bit on this topic as well as related work on things like OPML. Even then, we still have a way to go on making the UI as easy as social media sites do.
Replied to Why I Started Microblogging by Bryan Bryan (Bryan Sebesta)
So, I’ve started to microblog. I was inspired by Alan Jacobs’ recent article, getting back to the open web via micro.blog. One of the big reasons he supports starting a microblog this way is is because he owns the content; it’s part of his own domain, his turf. And that’s appealing to me. Ad...
Welcome to the game Bryan! Curious why you’re hosting your microblog separate from your main site instead of running them both from WordPress (not that you need to/have to)?

I’ve enjoyed linkblogging. When I read something, I can share the link along with a quote or reflection on how it affected me. It’s a great space to think out loud. 

Annotated on August 05, 2020 at 01:51PM

As Austin Kleon notes, blogging is a great way to discover what you have to say. My microblog has given me a chance to have thoughts, and this longer blog has given me a space to figure out what it means–to discover what it is I have to say. In other words, my microblog is where I collect the raw materials; my blog is where I assemble them into questions and, perhaps, answers. It’s a place where I figure out what I really think. 

Annotated on August 05, 2020 at 01:54PM