Replied to a thread by @mizminh and @MikeKra36812131 (Twitter)
@mizminh @MikeKra36812131 These notebooks were often historically called commonplace books, zettelkasten, waste books, florilegia, etc.
Replied to a tweet by TfT Hacker - Exploring Tools for Thought and PKM (Twitter)
Good tools for thought encourage or allow me to:

  • Easily and quickly capture interesting ideas and their original or related contexts so I can artificially remember more of what I’ve seen, read, and thought.
  • Link these ideas to related and non-related ideas and contexts.
  • Dramatically accelerates the creation of new ideas with respect to combinatorial creativity and ideas having sex.
  • Have a greater ability to focus on bigger ideas by letting me forget some less familiar minutiae. I can think more by remembering less though repeated good ideas filter up to the top and through repeated linking and use are more easily remembered.
Replied to a tweet by Ingo Steinke (Twitter)
@MicroDotBlog is a lovely, full-featured platform that meets you where you’re at by supplying the pieces you may be missing. If you’ve already got your own site, you can plug it in and use it as a reader; it supplies notifications if you don’t support webmention; etc.
Replied to a tweet by Theresia Tanzil (Twitter)
@theresiatanzil Usually via a pre-built memory palace for mobile notes, then I transcribe later.
Replied to Sharing to micro.blog by Samuel ClaySamuel Clay (The NewsBlur Forum)
Sure, I’d love to support it. What’s the URL you want NewsBlur to share to? I can have it auto-fill in the title and url. Also, for bonus credit, what’s the url of the favicon?
There’s two different discussions happening here, one seemingly about posting to micro.blog and the other about posting to any website that has a micropub endpoint. Since micro.blog accounts all have micropub endpoints the second method subsumes the first.

In general most micropub clients authenticate using an IndieAuth mechanism which micro.blog also supports and this allows apps (Newsblur in this case) to send formatted data (an article’s title, URL, and a person’s reply, for example) to be published on third party websites. Developers interested in the pieces might inquire in the IndieWeb chat about the quickest and easiest method for implementing or to see some other examples and find open sourced clients/servers that already do most of the heavy lifting: https://chat.indieweb.org/dev. It would be great to see Newsblur added to the growing list of clients that can publish to independent third party websites.

Unless and until Newsblur were to support this, I notice that it does have IFTTT support, so one might be able to carefully write some recipes that allows some functionality to dovetail with any website that has a micropub endpoint. I’ve documented some similar work I did using IFTTT to get the Inoreader feed reader to post reads, bookmarks, and replies to others’ sites to my WordPress website using micropub. I would abandon Inoreader for a reader with good Micropub support.


h/t to Jeremy Cherfas’ post for bringing this to my attention.

Replied to a post by HalstedHalsted (cygnoir.net)
Diamine Inkvent, Day 23: Wonderland. If by “wonderland” you mean “Tang orange drink mix.”
Cygnoir, congrats on your new IndieWeb wiki template. I’m glad to have another pen/ink enthusiast tinkering around in the space. In case you missed it, I’ve been experimenting with handwriting and the web over the last month. Here’s a summary: Handwriting my Website with a Digital Amanuensis.
Replied to a thread by Roy Scholten and Sonja Drimmer (Twitter)
@Hypothes_is, you guys are working on this, right? 😜
Replied to a tweet by Andrew Wetzel (Twitter)
There are some additional details for making themes IndieWeb friendly here: https://indieweb.org/WordPress/Themes
Several of us can give you help and guidance if you want to take a crack at it: https://chat.indieweb.org/wordpress/
 
Replied to The Dawn of Everything – Part 1 by Miriam Ronzoni (Crooked Timber)
I recently finished reading* The Dawn of Everything by David Graeber and David Wengrow; I enjoyed it very much indeed. I thought I’d write a two parts review for CT, and here’s the first – I will p…
I’ve only begun reading the text for a book club being run by historian Dan Allosso who is also doing an experiment in a communally shared wiki/notebook platform Obsidian, but I’m quite curious about the Neolithic pieces relating to the inhabitants at Stonehenge. In particular, I’ve recently finished Lynne Kelly’s research in Knowledge and Power in Prehistoric Societies: Orality, Memory and the Transmission of Culture (Cambridge University Press, 2015) in which she touches on the primary orality of those peoples and the profound impact that settling into sedentary lifeways may have had on their culture. If she’s correct, then that settlement was dramatically “expensive” and more complex than we’ve been led to believe. This may have had confounding issues within their society as it grew and flourished. I would suspect that Graeber and Wengrow don’t touch on this portion of the complexity, but it may support their general thesis. I’ll try to report back as I get deeper into the topic.

Incidentally, if folks want to join this Obsidian book club on this text, it’s just starting and is comprised of a number of academics and researchers in a vein similar to CT. A quick web search should uncover the details to join.

Replied to a tweet by @hyperlink_a (Twitter)
@hyperlink_a 2 and 4 or maybe:
– Lifelong Learning Network
– Learning Atelier
Replied to a thread by Flancian and Silicon Jungle (Twitter)
@flancian @JungleSilicon Expert? 🙈I may be the only one posting to my website using pen and paper or to my vault via [[micropub]], but you’ll find many experts, ideas, and help at https://chat.indieweb.org/dev if you need it.
Replied to a thread by Phil Windley, Jon Udell, Matt (Twitter)
There are still many in the (dare I use “old school”?) education space like @CogDog and @JimGroom who still do blog to blog conversations via comment sections.

I’ve seen a growing group of others who are using and displaying Webmentions for site-to-site conversations. If you use WordPress, there’s the Webmention plugin for the notifications part and the Semantic Linkbacks plugin for the display part. (One day the two will merge, we hope.)

Plugins and modules exist for a number of other systems if they’re not already built in.

I’m using all these on my site to have site-to-site conversations with others. I’m also using Brid.gy to bridge the gap between WordPress and Twitter (and others). If you prefer, you could read all this on my site.

Happy to help others set this up for themselves, should they need help.

Replied to a tweet by Dr. Tamar MarvinDr. Tamar Marvin (Twitter)
@tamar_marvin This seems incredibly similar to the traditions of oral cultures as explored by Milman Parry & Albert Lord in their work on orality & followed up by Walter Ong et al. Examples include Homer in the Greek tradition and the guslars of Yugoslavia.

Thanks for highlighting it!

Replied to a tweet by krish (Twitter)
@krishkhubchand Why not (also) scribble them down for your future self and place them in your commonplace book/zettelkasten/notebook/other? If you want to be interactive and get feedback, post them to a website or digital garden…
Replied to a thread by Annie Murphy Paul and Howard Rheingold (Twitter)
Anecdotally, I’ve seen this sort of behavior happening in the margins of ethical educational tools like @Hypothes_is. Some of them are in smaller groups and private groups, which stay hidden. I try to do much of my thinking & commenting there in public: https://hypothes.is/users/chrisaldrich