Read Timeful Texts by Andy Matuschak, Michael Nielsen (numinous.productions)
How might one escape a book’s shackled sense of time, extending the authored experience over weeks and months?
It looks to me like Andy and Michael are grasping at recreating with modern technology and tools what many (most? all?) indigenous cultures around the world used to ritually learn and memorize their culture’s knowledge. Mnemonics, spaced repetition, graded initiation, orality, dance, and song were all used as a cohesive whole to do this.

The best introduction to many of these methods and their pedagogic uses is best described by Lynne Kelly‘s book Knowledge and Power in Prehistoric Societies: Orality, Memory, and the Transmission of Culture (Cambridge University Press, 2015).

If they take her ideas as a basis and then layer on their own thinking, I think they’ll get much further much quicker. Based on my reading of their work thus far, they’re limiting themselves solely with western and modern cultures or at least those of a post-Peter Ramus world.

As an example, I’ve recently been passively watching the Netflix series The Who Was? Show which is geared toward children, but it does a phenomenal job of creating entertaining visuals, costumes, jokes, songs, dances, over-the-top theatricality, and small mnemonic snippets to teach children about famous people in our culture. Naturally this is geared toward neophytes, but it’s memorable, especially when watched with some spaced repetition. To follow it up properly it needs the next 10 layers of content and information to provide the additional depth to move it from children’s knowledge to adult and more sophisticated knowledge. Naturally this should be done at a level appropriate to the learner and their age and sophistication and include relevant related associative memory techniques, but it’s a start.

I’ll note that our educational system’s inability to connect (or associate) new knowledge with previous knowledge is a major drawback. 

Replied to u-read-of/read-status proposed draft · Issue #10 · microformats/h-entry (GitHub)
https://indieweb.org/read Indiebookclub.biz is a micropub client that publishes this.
The Post Kinds plugin displays the posts created by it and allows the creation of posts with the read-of proper...
I seem to recall @gRegorLove having some reservations about having implemented the read-status indicators. Since there are proposals for watch-of and listen-of and potentially other similar future verbs which may have a variety of “tenses” or a sense of progress across time, I wonder if it may be more advisable to have a completely separate progress/tense related microformat? This would provide the broader benefit of allowing it to be reused in those other cases rather than being specific to the read case only.

Perhaps a grow-able spectrum of statuses like: p-want-to, p-currently, and p-finished? (These are placeholder suggestions as we may do better with some thought on naming). These could be used in combination with the other proposed read, watch, and listen related microformats (or other potential future classes of verbs). The “want” status is reasonably well attested for activities like want to read, want to watch, want to listen, want to buy (or acquire), etc. Most of these are often finished in relatively short (or very long) time frames such that on-going statuses like watching, listening, or owning may not be posted frequently the way that an ongoing “reading” progress-like status might be used over the days, weeks, months that books are being read. I could see myself using ongoing statuses like these being used with to-do list items or project management related functionality as well. Longer term checkins at on-going events (conferences, festivals, vacations, etc.) might benefit from these statuses as well.

Separating the progress (tense) from the verb/action may also make it easier to create collections of posts around the related content. (An example may be the collection of all the posts about a particular book: the want post, the progress posts, notes, annotations, etc.)

On a separate note, I’ll mention that @swentel’s Indigenous for Android has added publishing support for both p-read-of and p-read-status (as well as all the proposed values) in the past few months.

Replied to Should: The Wrong Foundation for Work (and Life) by Tracy DurnellTracy Durnell (Cascadia Inspired)
I’m a “should”-er. I “should” myself about my career, my relationships, my diet, my priorities. “Should” is insidious. It disrupts my hard-thought-through priorities to tell me I’m focused on the wrong goals. “Should” makes it hard to distinguish what I … Continue reading →
I’ve totally got this problem too. When it applies to my want to read book list I simply use the framing of an antilibrary.
 
I like the way you’ve framed it with the “should” idea. Another framing I’ve seen for this sort of philosophy is a more extreme “No ‘yes.’ Either ‘HELL YEAH!’ or ‘no’.” 
Replied to What I'm Excited About with Joining the Indie Web by Tracy DurnellTracy Durnell (Cascadia Inspired)
I've always been about having my own site instead of relying on companies, but the IndieWeb represents a new philosophy and approach to using the internet.
This just tickles me pink.

And now we’re going to have to nerd out on digital gardens and commonplace books too…

Replied to Why I Started Microblogging by Bryan Bryan (Bryan Sebesta)
So, I’ve started to microblog. I was inspired by Alan Jacobs’ recent article, getting back to the open web via micro.blog. One of the big reasons he supports starting a microblog this way is is because he owns the content; it’s part of his own domain, his turf. And that’s appealing to me. Ad...
Welcome to the game Bryan! Curious why you’re hosting your microblog separate from your main site instead of running them both from WordPress (not that you need to/have to)?

I’ve enjoyed linkblogging. When I read something, I can share the link along with a quote or reflection on how it affected me. It’s a great space to think out loud. 

Annotated on August 05, 2020 at 01:51PM

As Austin Kleon notes, blogging is a great way to discover what you have to say. My microblog has given me a chance to have thoughts, and this longer blog has given me a space to figure out what it means–to discover what it is I have to say. In other words, my microblog is where I collect the raw materials; my blog is where I assemble them into questions and, perhaps, answers. It’s a place where I figure out what I really think. 

Annotated on August 05, 2020 at 01:54PM

Replied to a tweet by Aram Zucker-ScharffAram Zucker-Scharff (Twitter)
#IndieWeb to the rescue. There are a few great options for this. None of which should require you to write any code! 

One of my favorite is Kevin Marks’ Noter Live (open source) which is great for live tweeting and creating long threads quickly, especially at conferences. When you’re done, it’s kept a record of everything which you can quickly cut/paste as HTML into your website for an instant archive post.

Another option if your website supports the Micropub spec (perhaps with a plugin?) ThreadReaderApp recently added support to let you unroll the thread and you can go to your account and authenticate to your website and post the thread with one click.

I’ll also note that WordPress’ Gutenberg just added the ability to unroll threads to websites built with it as well. 

In addition to general public use, these could actually be the backbone of an interesting journalistic live notebook for reporters in the field who could quickly compile/archive their threads for expanded articles later on.

Replied to a tweet (Twitter)
I’ve always loved OPML subscription: you follow an OPML source that automatically updates your feed over time. Sadly @inoreader is one of the few apps that supports it.
Replied to a tweet by Ian BrownIan Brown (Twitter)
#IndieWeb interoperability FTW!
Replied to thread
Another option, though without Micropub (yet!), is Kevin MarksNoterLive tool. It’ll let you create a thread and then (manually) copy over the rich data into your website pretty quickly. I love it especially for conferences.
Replied to a tweet by Tracy DurnellTracy Durnell (Twitter)
Tracy, you’re not shouting into the void. If you’re interested, a few of us are hosting a free pop-up session that will cover that issue (and a lot more) in just a few weeks: Getting Started with WordPress, an IndieWebCamp Pop-up Session. Also happy to discuss it at any of the upcoming Homebrew Website Club Meetups too!
Replied to a post by Xandra (biglizardbooks.net)
Articles on Quill don’t seem to have the ability to syndicate to twitter and mastodo, so I might end up using micropublish. Bit frustrating to figure this all out, but also kind of fun to be honest.
If you use the Syndication Links plugin and configure it, Quill should be able to find your Twitter and Mastodon “endpoints” on your site and provide you with buttons to syndicate to them. 

It looks like your theme has an extra u-photo on it that’s causing that avatar image to be sent to Twitter by the way. The way the microformats are set up is also causing them (Syndication Links) to display too, but it’s fixable with some tinkering. You might try IndieWeb chat to see if someone can help you troubleshoot it.

Replied to a tweet by James Van Dyne (Twitter)
I do that! Try Micropub plugin + Syndication Links plugin + Quill or any of the other micropub clients that support posting notes and syndication endpoints.

Reach out if you need help to get it set up.

If you want to go crazy and thread your Twitter conversations, that’s possible too…

Replied to a tweet by CeliaMcKee (Twitter)
We definitely need to normalize “failure”. I remember a CV of Failures from @jhaushofer from a few years back.

with additional coverage.