Read How to Cover a Sick Old Man (nytimes.com)
The president is hospitalized and reporters are fighting for basic facts. What should elderly leaders — many of America’s top politicians are over 80 — reveal about their health?
We definitely need to cover these things more closely and not be so precious about them. Once a leader is unable to function on a solid basis, it’s time for them to get off the stage and let others take their place.
Read 43 Student Journalists Quit N.Y.U. Paper After Dispute With Adviser (nytimes.com)
A post signed by nearly all of the Washington Square News staff accused its new adviser, a longtime journalism professor, of being “rude and disrespectful.”
Definite cultural divide here between the student journalists and their much older advisor who doesn’t get the younger generation.
Read Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg dead at 87 by Joan Biskupic and Ariane de Vogue, CNN (CNN)
Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg died on Friday due to complications of metastatic pancreas cancer, the court announced. She was 87.
Sadly, it appears that when I first visited this article there was only a headline with a notice that the story was emerging. Apparently CNN placing a timestamp online to indicate that they were breaking news, but without actually breaking much beyond the headline.
Read -30- (Wikipedia)
-30- has been traditionally used by journalists in North America to indicate the end of a story or article that is submitted for editing and typesetting. It is commonly employed when writing on deadline and sending bits of the story at a time, via telegraphy, teletype, electronic transmission, or paper copy, as a necessary way to indicate the end of the article. It is also found at the end of press releases.
Read Tombstone (typography) (Wikipedia)
In mathematics, the tombstone, halmos, end-of-proof, or Q.E.D. symbol "∎" (or "□") is a symbol used to denote the end of a proof, in place of the traditional abbreviation "Q.E.D." for the Latin phrase "quod erat demonstrandum", meaning "which was to be demonstrated". In magazines, it is one of the various symbols used to indicate the end of an article. In Unicode, it is represented as character U+220E ∎ END OF PROOF (HTML ∎). Its graphic form varies, as it may be a hollow or filled rectangle or square.
Read Bari Weiss Is Leaving the New York Times (vice.com)
The writer and editor has self-expelled from the newspaper, she tells VICE.

Update, 11:22 Eastern: Weiss has posted a letter of resignation addressed to Times publisher A.G. Sulzberger on her website. In it, she denounces the Times for fostering an atmosphere of stifling conformity and accuses her now-former colleagues of bullying: 

Having your own website is a must, particularly when you’ve just left one of the biggest platforms on the planet and still need to have a platform to reach your audience and the world. 
Annotated on July 17, 2020 at 04:27PM

Replied to a tweet by isellsoap
I’m happy to help you envision some of what’s possible on this front for professional newspapers, magazines, podcasts, etc. I’d love to see more journalistic outlets explore this space.

Feel free to email or call me directly and we can set up a time to chat.

Read Here Comes Everybody - Tummlers, Geishas, Animateurs and Chief Conversation Officers help us listen by Kevin MarksKevin Marks (epeus.blogspot.com)
Bob Garfield's de haut en bas attack on web commenters upset two very skilled conversational catalysts, Ira Glass, and Derek Powazek. The false dichotomy of 'we choose who you get to hear' and 'total anarchic mob noise' was dismissed by Jack Lail too. At the same time, Ben Laurie explained how the IETF's open-to-all mailing lists can be hijacked by time-rich fools, talking about the Open Web Foundation.
In the last few months I came across Derek’s side of the story and so I dug back into archives (literally archive.org) to find the original show and catch the blog post conversation around this controversy. I particularly recall Ira and Jeff Jarvis’ conversations. Somehow I didn’t see Kevin’s portion of the conversation in the comments sections of the others, but I’m glad to have it pop up just a few weeks later to complete the circle.

Of the group, Kevin, as usual, provides some of the best analysis, but he also adds in a huge amount of additional context by way of links.

Society seems to have ripped itself open recently and I can’t help but think that we’re going to need some strong tummelers and heavy work to allow everyone to speak, be heard, and create some change. Kevin’s piece here may be a good starting point.

Perhaps this is the piece some of our mainstream media have been missing from a journalistic perspective? For too long they’ve acted as aggregators and filters, but perhaps they should be spending a larger portion of their time doing some tummeling work on our behalf?

Read New York Times staffers revolt over publication of Tom Cotton op-ed (CNN)
Staffers at The New York Times expressed dismay Wednesday over the newspaper's decision to publish an op-ed written by Republican Sen. Tom Cotton that called for the U.S. military to be deployed in cities across the country to help restore order.