👓 it is an inescapable law of journalism that a simple yes/no question in a headline almost always requires a “No” | Jeremy Cherfas

Read Because it is an inescapable law of ... by Jeremy CherfasJeremy Cherfas (Jeremy Cherfas)
Because it is an inescapable law of journalism that a simple yes/no question in a headline almost always requires a "No". And in this particular case, I do not believe blogging waned in 2018. QED.

An interesting rule of thumb…

👓 Why I’m Leaving Medium | Praxis – Medium

Read Why I’m Leaving Medium by Tiago Forte (Praxis – Medium)
I’ve been writing on Medium for three and a half years.

Some of these reasons are very pragmatic for everyone, but he’s also got some business specific ones that touch on things many small businesses would want control over as well. He additionally points out some very subtle changes in media for people who are reaching out to niche audiences. Some of this is reminiscent to things Leo Laporte has spoken about in the past with respect to leaving television and cable to start a podcast network, except in that case there really wasn’t a huge amount of competing media, so instead of moving to silos (which didn’t exist at the time for his use case) he went straight to using his own platform.

📑 Why I’m Leaving Medium | Praxis – Medium

Annotated Why I’m Leaving Medium by Tiago Forte (Praxis – Medium)
Online media, despite being so different from traditional printed media, is still trying to maximize its potential audience, and in order to do that, going for quantity over quality.  
Replied to Indie Communities and Making Your Audience Known by Ben WerdmüllerBen Werdmüller (Ben Werdmüller)

It sounds ludicrous now, but back in 2014, when I cofounded Known as a startup, a lot of people were questioning whether a business even needed a website. Pockets of people - for example in the indieweb community, which I enthusiastically joined - were pointing out how short-sighted this was, but it was a minority opinion. There was Facebook and Twitter! Why would you want to have any kind of property that you fully controlled on the internet?

Fast forward to today, and... 

As I read this, there are some underlying ideas that again make me think that newspapers, magazines, and other journalistic outlets should pick up the mantle of social media and help their readers (aka community) by providing them with websites that they can control and use to interact. Many newspapers and other outlets are already building their own CMSes and even licensening them out to other papers, why not take the next step and build a platform that can host and manage websites for individual users? They’ve got most of the infrastructure there already? Why not tack on a few simple things that allow their users to better interact with them on the open web. It solves their ownership issues as well as their reliance on social media silos and could even provide a nice, modest income stream (or even a bonus that comes along with one’s subscription?)

Perhaps Kinja wasn’t a bad idea for a CMS cum commenting system, it just wasn’t open web enough?

👓 In the Shadow of the CMS | The Nation

Read In the Shadow of the CMS by Kyle ChaykaKyle Chayka (The Nation)
How content-management systems will shape the future of media businesses big and small. 

With all these self-made CMSes for distributing journalism, why not go a half step further and create a full-on network of hosted and managed IndieWeb websites? These could be for both their journalists to use (the way many do with Twitter, Facebook, Instagram) in their research as well as for their own users which could also incidentally use them to interact with the paper itself as well as their surrounding communities?

For a low cost per month, it could be an interesting side business, or even be bundled with paid subscriptions?

📑 Publishers build a common tech platform together | Nieman Lab

Annotated Publishers build a common tech platform together by Jonathan GillJonathan Gill (Nieman Lab)

One way to meet the many needs that most if not all publishers share would be to collaboratively develop their digital products. Specifically, they should build for interoperability. One publisher’s CMS, another’s content APIs, a third company’s data offering — they might one day all work together to allow all ships to rise and to reclaim advertising and subscription revenue from the platforms. This might allow publishers to refocus on differentiating where it truly matters for the user: in the quality of their content.  

Some of this is already afoot within the IndieWeb community with new protocols like Webmention, Micropub, WebSub, and Microsub. Journalists should know about this page on their wiki.

👓 Publishers build a common tech platform together | Nieman Journalism Lab

Read Publishers build a common tech platform together by Jonathan GillJonathan Gill (Nieman Lab)
"From a business standpoint, publishers aren't competing with each other so much as they are with the big technology platforms — Google, Facebook, Apple, and so on. Yet publishers expend huge amounts of energy optimizing competitively against one another."

👓 The platform tide is turning | Nieman Journalism Lab

Read The platform tide is turning by Ben WerdmüllerBen Werdmüller (Nieman Lab)
“Instead of becoming more like technology companies or remaining beholden to platforms, publishers could help to build the internet they need.”

There are an impressive number of IndieWeb-related articles in this year’s list of Nieman Journalism Lab 2019 Predictions. Somehow I had missed the one written by our own Ben Werdmüller, or perhaps they continued publishing them after I’d seen the first batch?

👓 Dear Journalists, Stop Being Loudspeakers for Liars | Dan Gillmor

Read Dear Journalists, Stop Being Loudspeakers for Liars by Dan Gillmor (Medium)
An open letter to newsrooms everywhere

👓 The year we step back from the platform | Nieman Journalism Lab | Ernie Smith

Read The year we step back from the platform by Ernie SmithErnie Smith (Nieman Lab)
"Let's replace the shadows that Twitter and Facebook and Google have been on the media with some business-model fundamentals. As 2018 has shown, they've offered us a lot more heartache than it feels like they're actually worth."

This is a very staid and sober statement about the ills of social media platforms (aka silos) and a proposed way forward for 2019. His argument is tremendously bolstered by the fact that he’s actually got his own website where he’s hosting and distributing his own content.

Ernie, should you see this, I’d welcome you to come join a rapidly growing group of creators who have been doing almost exactly what you’ve prescribed. We’re amassing a wealth of knowledge, tools, code, and examples at Indieweb.org to help you and others on their journey to better owning and controlling their online identities in almost the exact way in which you’re talking about in your article. Both individually and together we’re trying to build web websites that allow all the functionality of the platforms, but in a way that is both easy and beautiful for everyone to manage and use. Given the outlet for your piece, I’ll also mention that there’s a specific page for IndieWeb and Journalism.

I’d invite you to join the online chat and add yourself as an example to any of the appropriate pages, including perhaps for Craft. Also feel free to discuss your future plans and ask for any help or support you’d like to see for improving your own website. Together I hope we can all make your prediction for 2019 a reality.

 

Highlights, Quotes, Annotations, & Marginalia

But what if, in 2019, we take a step back and decide not to let the platform decide how to run the show?  

The IndieWeb has already made some solid strides.

January 09, 2019 at 07:55AM

I’ve been working on a redesign of my site recently, using a more robust CMS, and the advantages of controlling the structure of the platform soup-to-nuts are obvious, even if it requires more upfront work.  

January 09, 2019 at 07:57AM

2019 is the year when publishers — whether big ones like Axios or the Los Angeles Times or tiny ones like mine or Judd Legum’s Popular Information — move away from letting someone else call all the shots. Or, at least, they should.  

There’s already some work and movement in the IndieWeb with respect to journalism.

January 09, 2019 at 08:01AM

📖 Nancy Pelosi, Chuck Schumer demand equal airtime to respond to Trump’s address | CNN

Read Nancy Pelosi, Chuck Schumer demand equal airtime to respond to Trump's address by Brian Stelter and Oliver Darcy (CNN)
The major television networks said that they will provide wall-to-wall coverage of President Donald Trump's prime time address on border security on Tuesday.

This coverage is sure to be I’ll thought out and disastrous. The opposition party should definitely get equal time.

I’ll boycott any network that doesn’t have the text in advance with fact checking and ample time for rebuttal after.

👓 Nancy Pelosi, Chuck Schumer demand equal airtime to respond to Trump’s address | CNN

Read Nancy Pelosi, Chuck Schumer demand equal airtime to respond to Trump's address by Brian Stelter and Oliver Darcy (CNN)
The major television networks said that they will provide wall-to-wall coverage of President Donald Trump's prime time address on border security on Tuesday.

This journalistic decision is sure to be completely ill advised.

I’m very seriously considering any major network that airs this without obtaining the text of the speech in advance and without serious fact checking and without additional rebuttal time for the opposition party in advance.

There is absolutely no credible threat of anything at the border and this play is pure politics. If there were a credible threat, then there should be someone from the Pentagon giving the briefing and it should happen immediately and not tomorrow.

🎧 “The Daily”: Bob Woodward on Trump, Nixon and Anonymity | New York Times

Listened to "The Daily": Bob Woodward on Trump, Nixon and Anonymity by Michael Barbaro from New York Times

The reporter sat down with “The Daily” to talk about what it took to get access to the White House and why he called his new book “Fear.”

l love that this is more about process and history with Nixon as well as covering “anonymous” sources (aka deep background) and what they really mean. There isn’t nearly the level of book promotion here that I might have otherwise suspected.

🔖 Journalism, Online Comments, and the Future of Public Discourse by Marie K. Shanahan | Routledge

Bookmarked Journalism, Online Comments, and the Future of Public Discourse by Marie K. ShanahanMarie K. Shanahan (Routledge)

Comments on digital news stories and on social media play an increasingly important role in public discourse as more citizens communicate through online networks. The reasons for eliminating comments on news stories are plentiful. Off-topic posts and toxic commentary have been shown to undermine legitimate news reporting. Yet the proliferation of digital communication technology has revolutionized the setting for democratic participation. The digital exchange of ideas and opinions is now a vital component of the democratic landscape. Marie K. Shanahan's book argues that public digital discourse is crucial component of modern democracy―one that journalists must stop treating with indifference or detachment―and for news organizations to use journalistic rigor and better design to add value to citizens’ comments above the social layer. Through original interviews, anecdotes, field observations and summaries of research literature, Shanahan explains the obstacles of digital discourse as well as its promises for journalists in the digital age.

book cover of  Journalism, Online Comments, and the Future of Public Discourse

hat tip: Newsrooms take the comments sections back from platforms