👓 How to Cover Hate — The Disinformation War | Columbia Journalism Review

Read How to Cover Hate — The Disinformation War by Sam Thielman (The Disinformation War)
At UNC Charlotte in North Carolina on Tuesday, April 30, a 22-year-old man allegedly shot six people in his anthropology class with a handgun, wounding four and killing two. Three days earlier, on the last day of Passover, in Poway, California, a 19-year-old man walked into a synagogue with what police described as an “AR-type assault weapon” and now stands accused of killing a 60-year-old woman and injuring another congregant, the rabbi, and an 8-year-old girl.

👓 Should the Media Quit Facebook? — The Disinformation War | Columbia Journalism Review

Read Should the Media Quit Facebook? — The Disinformation War by Mathew Ingram (The Disinformation War)
With all that has transpired between Facebook and the media industry over the past couple of years—the repeated algorithm changes, the head fakes about switching to video, the siphoning off of a significant chunk of the industry’s advertising revenue—most publishers approach the giant social network with skepticism, if not outright hostility. And yet, the vast majority of them continue to partner with Facebook, to distribute their content on its platform, and even accept funding and resources from it.

A very solid question to be asking and to be working on answers for. 

Personally I feel like newspapers, magazines, and media should help to be providing IndieWeb-based open platforms of their own for not only publishing their own work, but for creating the local commons for their readers and constituents to be able to freely and openly interact with them.

They’re letting Facebook and other social media to own too much of their content and even their audience. Building tools to take it back could help them, their readers, and even democracy out all at the same time.

Sadly, based on what I’m seeing here, however, even CJR has outsourced their platform for this series to SquareSpace. At least they’re publishing it on a URL they own and control.

👓 Maria Ressa, Zeynep Tufekci, and others on the growing disinformation war | Columbia Journalism Review

Read Maria Ressa, Zeynep Tufekci, and others on the growing disinformation war (Columbia Journalism Review)

📑 Maria Ressa, Zeynep Tufekci, and others on the growing disinformation war | Columbia Journalism Review

Annotated Maria Ressa, Zeynep Tufekci, and others on the growing disinformation war (Columbia Journalism Review)
Tufekci argued that, in the 21st century, a surfeit of information, rather than its absence, poses the biggest problem. “When I was growing up in Turkey, the way censorship occurred was there was one TV channel and they wouldn’t show you stuff. That was it,” she said. “Currently, in my conceptualization, the way censorship occurs is by information glut. It’s not that the relevant information isn’t out there. But it is buried in so much information of suspect credibility that it doesn’t mean anything.”  

Featured image “Vintage Television” by Sven Scheuermeier via CC on Unsplash

🎧 Episode 045 – Tania Rashid, Global identity and becoming a “one-woman-shop” in journalism | Media and the End of the World Podcast

Listened to Episode 045 – Tania Rashid, Global identity and becoming a “one-woman-shop” in journalism by Adam Croom and Ralph Beliveau from Media and the End of the World Podcast

Ralph chats with Tania Rashid, a freelance journalist in South Asia. I’ve produced and hosted for Al Jazeera English, CNN International, and Vice News.

I love Rashid’s take on modern journalism, particularly getting rid of words like “fixer”. There’s an excellent reminder here that I need to broaden some of my news consumption to take a more international approach. I loved that they asked her the question about what sources she reads/watches/listens to.

👓 “I felt like it was a betrayal, and we had raised funds on false pretense”: The Correspondent’s first U.S. employee speaks out | Nieman Lab

Read “I felt like it was a betrayal, and we had raised funds on false pretense”: The Correspondent’s first U.S. employee speaks out (Nieman Lab)
"They're really good at the PR thing, and it really feels like gaslighting. They were like, 'Well, we never promised a U.S. newsroom.' I was like: Wait, did I just imagine all this?"

I remember seeing Jay Rosen’s initial posts and thinking it was an interesting concept. I loved his first podcast interview, but thought it seemed suspicious when no further episodes were done or released, so that by the time the crowd fund came around, my gut said to wait and see what happened. 

👓 The Correspondent apologizes as Nate Silver, David Simon, and Baratunde Thurston speak out | Nieman Lab

Read The Correspondent apologizes as Nate Silver, David Simon, and Baratunde Thurston speak out (Nieman Lab)
"We screwed up," The Correspondent said in a tweeted statement.

Suspicious that their statement wasn’t actually signed by anyone…

👓 Julia Angwin Is Out as Editor of New Tech Watchdog Site The Markup | New York Times

Read Julia Angwin Is Out as Editor of New Tech Watchdog Site The Markup (New York Times)
Ms. Angwin was one of three founders of The Markup, which is dedicated to investigating technology and its effects on society. Five journalists resigned.

👓 Support for Julia Angwin grows as funders investigate the “coup” at The Markup” | Nieman Lab

Read Support for Julia Angwin grows as funders investigate the “coup” at The Markup (Nieman Lab)
After her ouster as editor-in-chief, multiple funders say they are taking steps to "reassess" their support.

👓 The Demands of Positive Celebrity Coverage | Jezebel

Read The Demands of Positive Celebrity Coverage (The Muse)
It’s been a rough week to be a star, and a rough week to be someone who listens to what stars have to say. At least, that’s what social media tells me. Some of the most famous people making music today—Ariana Grande, Cardi B, and Justin Bieber (as well as Lizzo, a darling of critics and her fans but not quite of superstar status... yet?)—have shared their thoughts online regarding the state of media in 2019. None of it advocates for a free press, much less even contends with that notion. The gist is that journalism should be service journalism that primarily serves the powerful and their images.

🎧 Tucker Was Tucker All Along | On the Media | WNYC Studios

Listened to Tucker Was Tucker All Along from On the Media | WNYC Studios

Will Fox News darling Tucker Carlson have to pay a price for newly unearthed despicable comments from his past? Eh, probably not.

To suggest that Tucker Carlson has a tendency to hint at deeply discriminatory tropes would be cliché — but also dead-on. Just this week, thanks to newly unearthed audio released by Media Matters, the Fox News darling ditches his signature dog whistle in exchange for unmistakable and unapologetic hate speech.

Who is Tucker Carlson, really? In this week's pod extra, Bob delves into the origins of the now-notorious commentator with Lyz Lenz, a writer for Columbia Journalism Review who profiled Carlson in September.

🎧 Crossing the Line | On the Media | WNYC Studios

Listened to Crossing the Line from On the Media | WNYC Studios

A secret government database of immigration reporters, new questions about the Obama Presidential Center, and the history of Plessy v. Ferguson

Mexican officials and U.S. Customs and Border Protection are using a secret database to target journalists and advocates at the southern border. This week, On the Media speaks with a reporter on the list who was detained for questioning by Mexican authorities. Plus, what the Obama Library’s unique arrangement with the National Archives means for the future of presidential history. And, the grotesque origins of segregation. 

1. Mari Payton [@MariNBCSD], reporter at NBC 7 in San Diego, and Kitra Cahana, freelance photojournalist, on the secret government database of immigration reporters and advocates. Listen.

2. Tim Naftali [@TimNaftali], historian at New York University and former director of the Nixon Presidential Library and Museum, and Louise Bernard, director of the museum at the Obama Presidential Center, on the Obama Foundation's decision to curate its own presidential museum. Listen.

3. Steve Luxenberg [@SLuxenberg], author of Separate, on the history of Plessy v. FergusonListen.

🎧 The Myth That Fuels the Anti-Vaxx Agenda | On the Media | WNYC Studios

Listened to The Myth That Fuels the Anti-Vaxx Agenda from On the Media | WNYC Studios

Our 2012 conversation with Seth Mnookin, author of The Panic Virus: A True Story of Medicine, Science and Fear.

This Tuesday, lawmakers in Washington heard from an 18-year-old who, against all odds, got his shots. Ethan Lindenberger, who fought with his own mother to get vaccinated, told senators, "for my mother, her love, affection, and care as a parent was used to push an agenda to create a false distress."

That "anti-vaxx" agenda, the dangerous legacy of a thoroughly debunked 1998 study in the British medical journal Lancet, was dealt yet another devastating — though not mortal — blow this week, courtesy of epidemiologists from Denmark’s Staten Serum Institute. Their new study, which included more than 650,000 children, found that the MMR vaccine did not raise the risk of developing autism

And yet, even in the face of study after study, and even as websites like Pinterest have moved to stamp out the spread of anti-vaxx materials on their websites, the debunked vaccine-autism link and its impact on public health live on. In this 2012 interview, Brooke spoke with Seth Mnookin, author of The Panic Virus: A True Story of Medicine, Science and Fear, about why these myths persist.

No responsible journalist should be reporting on studies with N being so small. If they do, then they should be banned from any future science journalism.