👓 Universal yanks TWiT’s ‘Tech News Today’ episode from YouTube due to Mega Video clip | VentureBeat

Read Universal yanks TWiT’s ‘Tech News Today’ episode from YouTube due to Mega Video clip (VentureBeat)
Universal Music Group has taken action to remove a recent episode of Tech News Today from YouTube because it contained clips of a MegaUpload video that Universal claims violates its copyright agreements. Tech News Today is a web show hosted on Leo Laporte’s TWiT’s web TV news network. In the yanked episode, the show’s hosts …

👓 Does the news reflect what we die from? | Our World in Data

Read Does the news reflect what we die from? (Our World in Data)
There is a large disconnect between what gets covered in the media and the day-to-day reality for most. How do causes of death in the US match with media coverage and what people search for online?

Some interesting ethical and moral questions here relating to public health and how it’s covered in the media.

This could be a nice interview segment for On the Media.

👓 The scariest chart in Mary Meeker’s slide deck for newspapers has gotten even a wee bit scarier | Nieman Lab

Read The scariest chart in Mary Meeker’s slide deck for newspapers has gotten even a wee bit scarier (Nieman Lab)
Comparing 2010 and 2018 side by side makes it clear what a changed media universe we now live in.

🎧 On Matters of War | On the Media | WNYC Studios

Listened to On Matters of War from On the Media | WNYC Studios

Controversy erupted over news that President Trump may grant more pardons for alleged war criminal Edward Gallagher and others. This week, On the Media looks at Fox News’s influence on the president’s decision. And, how the Navy may be spying on a reporter who's tracked Gallagher's case. Plus, how the latest Julian Assange indictment could spell disaster for the future of investigative journalism. 

1. James Goodale, former General Counsel for The New York Times and author of Fighting For The Press, on the disastrous new Julian Assange indictments. Listen

2. Adam Weinstein [@AdamWeinstein], an editor with The New Republic, on the unofficial Fox News campaign to push the president to pardon alleged war criminals. Listen.

3. Andrew Tilghman [@andrewtilghman], Executive Editor of the Military Times, on the Navy's troubling assault on press freedom. Listen.

4. Scott J. Shapiro [@scottjshapiro], professor of philosophy and law at Yale, on how militaries across the globe navigate the horrors of war. Listen.

👓 A Crisis of Cognition | BuzzMachine

Read A Crisis of Cognition by Jeff JarvisJeff Jarvis (BuzzMachine)
Alex Rosenberg, a philosopher of science at Duke, pulled this rug of storytelling out from under me with his new book How History Gets Things Wrong: The Neuroscience of Our Addiction to Stories. In it, heargues that the human addiction to the story is an extension of our reliance on the theory of mind. That theory holds that in our brains, humans balance beliefs and desires to decide on action. The theory, he explains, springs from lessons we as humans learned on the veldt, where we would mind-read — that is, use available information about our environment and others’ goals and past actions to predict the behavior of the antelope that is our quarry; the lion we are competing with; and our fellow tribesmen with whom we either compete or must trust to collaborate. “Since mind readers share their target animals’ environments, they have some sensory access to what the target animals see, hear, smell, taste, and so on,” Rosenberg says.

An interesting reframing of journalistic problems here.

👓 A reporter declined to reveal his source. Then police showed up at his front door with guns. | Washington Post

Read A reporter declined to reveal his source. Then police showed up at his front door with guns. by Eli Rosenberg (Washington Post)
Bryan Carmody, a freelance reporter in San Francisco, awoke Friday to the sounds of someone trying to break into his house. About 10 officers from the San Francisco Police Department were bashing the front gate of his home in the Outer Richmond neighborhood with a sledgehammer, he said. It was just after 8 o’clock in the morning.

👓 Distributed content: The best ways to build sustainable platform strategies | American Press Institute

Read Distributed content: The best ways to build sustainable platform strategies (American Press Institute)
Social platforms have forever altered the way consumers consume content online, but it can be hard to find footing in this new era. After a recent summit in NYC on the rise of distributed content, we’ve developed a list of strategic tactics publishers of any size can benefit from employing.

Interesting whitepaper, but too much talk about should without any evidence-based material or pieces which touch and improve an outlet’s bottom line. 

👓 How to Cover Hate — The Disinformation War | Columbia Journalism Review

Read How to Cover Hate — The Disinformation War by Sam Thielman (The Disinformation War)
At UNC Charlotte in North Carolina on Tuesday, April 30, a 22-year-old man allegedly shot six people in his anthropology class with a handgun, wounding four and killing two. Three days earlier, on the last day of Passover, in Poway, California, a 19-year-old man walked into a synagogue with what police described as an “AR-type assault weapon” and now stands accused of killing a 60-year-old woman and injuring another congregant, the rabbi, and an 8-year-old girl.

👓 Should the Media Quit Facebook? — The Disinformation War | Columbia Journalism Review

Read Should the Media Quit Facebook? — The Disinformation War by Mathew Ingram (The Disinformation War)
With all that has transpired between Facebook and the media industry over the past couple of years—the repeated algorithm changes, the head fakes about switching to video, the siphoning off of a significant chunk of the industry’s advertising revenue—most publishers approach the giant social network with skepticism, if not outright hostility. And yet, the vast majority of them continue to partner with Facebook, to distribute their content on its platform, and even accept funding and resources from it.

A very solid question to be asking and to be working on answers for. 

Personally I feel like newspapers, magazines, and media should help to be providing IndieWeb-based open platforms of their own for not only publishing their own work, but for creating the local commons for their readers and constituents to be able to freely and openly interact with them.

They’re letting Facebook and other social media to own too much of their content and even their audience. Building tools to take it back could help them, their readers, and even democracy out all at the same time.

Sadly, based on what I’m seeing here, however, even CJR has outsourced their platform for this series to SquareSpace. At least they’re publishing it on a URL they own and control.

👓 Maria Ressa, Zeynep Tufekci, and others on the growing disinformation war | Columbia Journalism Review

Read Maria Ressa, Zeynep Tufekci, and others on the growing disinformation war (Columbia Journalism Review)

📑 Maria Ressa, Zeynep Tufekci, and others on the growing disinformation war | Columbia Journalism Review

Annotated Maria Ressa, Zeynep Tufekci, and others on the growing disinformation war (Columbia Journalism Review)
Tufekci argued that, in the 21st century, a surfeit of information, rather than its absence, poses the biggest problem. “When I was growing up in Turkey, the way censorship occurred was there was one TV channel and they wouldn’t show you stuff. That was it,” she said. “Currently, in my conceptualization, the way censorship occurs is by information glut. It’s not that the relevant information isn’t out there. But it is buried in so much information of suspect credibility that it doesn’t mean anything.”  

Featured image “Vintage Television” by Sven Scheuermeier via CC on Unsplash

🎧 Episode 045 – Tania Rashid, Global identity and becoming a “one-woman-shop” in journalism | Media and the End of the World Podcast

Listened to Episode 045 – Tania Rashid, Global identity and becoming a “one-woman-shop” in journalism by Adam Croom and Ralph Beliveau from Media and the End of the World Podcast

Ralph chats with Tania Rashid, a freelance journalist in South Asia. I’ve produced and hosted for Al Jazeera English, CNN International, and Vice News.

I love Rashid’s take on modern journalism, particularly getting rid of words like “fixer”. There’s an excellent reminder here that I need to broaden some of my news consumption to take a more international approach. I loved that they asked her the question about what sources she reads/watches/listens to.

👓 “I felt like it was a betrayal, and we had raised funds on false pretense”: The Correspondent’s first U.S. employee speaks out | Nieman Lab

Read “I felt like it was a betrayal, and we had raised funds on false pretense”: The Correspondent’s first U.S. employee speaks out (Nieman Lab)
"They're really good at the PR thing, and it really feels like gaslighting. They were like, 'Well, we never promised a U.S. newsroom.' I was like: Wait, did I just imagine all this?"

I remember seeing Jay Rosen’s initial posts and thinking it was an interesting concept. I loved his first podcast interview, but thought it seemed suspicious when no further episodes were done or released, so that by the time the crowd fund came around, my gut said to wait and see what happened.