It looks like On The Media hasn’t created a Breaking News Consumer’s Handbook for racism, but we desperately need it. (In fact, we really need it for daily news not just breaking…)

Their own coverage usually highlights these sorts of broader issues, but we could all use an explainer/outline to better see when racism is being hidden by other media outlets that don’t take the time or make the effort.

A place to start: Moving the Race Conversation Forward: How the Media Covers Racism, and Other Barriers to Productive Racial Discourse by Race Forward


YWCA Glendale = in #YWCA21DayChallenge ()

Race Forward in Moving The Race Conversation Forward – YouTube ()

Read Inside the chaos of brand safety technology (branded.substack.com)
Integral Ad Science, Comscore and Oracle are leaking the top secret classifications they use to block ad revenues from the news.
The idea that brand safety is killing quality journalism is the shocking take away for me here. Companies are generally throwing away a lot of their advertising money into a dark pit, but to be doing it while actively killing journalism (and by proxy: democracy) is appalling.
Read Host of 'The Daily' Clouds 'N.Y. Times' Effort To Restore Trust After 'Caliphate' (NPR.org)
The New York Times issued a big mea culpa, and returned a Peabody award and a citation as a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize after retracting the core of its hit podcast series Caliphate.
Sounds like the definitely could have handled this better. 

I do remember taking their reporting with a massive grain of salt as there were caveats in the story which indicated there was some sketchiness on the part of their subject and whether or not he was there or not or did the things he claimed. I took the whole thing more as a narrative with some entertainment rather than hard-hitting journalism.

Bookmarked On the Media | Breaking News Consumer's Handbook | WNYC Studios (WNYC Studios)
Breaking news reporting often gets essential facts wrong. In fact, the rampant misreporting can be so common as to be predictable. And so, On the Media has developed formulas (with the help of experts) for how to spot spotty coverage. Rather than counting on news outlets to get it right, we're looking at the other end. We have some tips for how to sort good information from bad -- whether the breaking news is about a tragic mass shooting or a stock market crash, an epidemic or a rash of election polls. Below is our collection of Breaking News Consumer's Handbooks, and it's growing all the time. Each one comes with a printable PDF that you can tape to your wall the next time you encounter a big news event.
I’ve listened to many in this series over time, but there are a few I’ve missed and would like to revisit. 
Reposted a tweet by Julia Angwin
#ScrapingIsNotACrime

Following Zeynep Tufekci

Let’s face it: Zeynep Tufekci’s output is too important to miss. Since there doesn’t seem to be a “canonical” source for everything, I’ve aggregated an RSS feed of all her work that I can find and incorporate.

This aggregate feed includes all of the following, some more frequently updated than others. I’ve included her Twitter feed as a backstop.

If you’re aware of something I’m missing that isn’t terrifically duplicative, do let me know. I still wish it were easier to follow specific individual writers across platforms and outlets.

Read thread by @gathara (threadreaderapp.com)
#BREAKING Polls are set to open in 48 hours across the US as the authoritarian regime of Donald Trump attempts to consolidate its hold over the troubled, oil-rich, nuclear-armed, north American nation. Analysts are sceptical the election will end months of political violence.
This is an awesome and socially enlightening thread. 
Read Between the Lines (American Lifestyle Magazine)
On the corner of San Juan Avenue and Fourth Street in Saguache (pronounced Suh-WATCH), Colorado, stands a building the color of daffodils, with green trim and many windows, and if you tap on the glass, you might just get invited in. On most days, one can find Dean Coombs—the third-generation publisher of the Saguache Crescent—tinkering on a Linotype machine inside. The Crescent is the only Linotype newspaper in the country, and maybe even the world. Talking to Dean Coombs is like getting a history lesson and a tutorial on newspaper printing at the same time. Coombs has only lived away from Saguache for four years, making the sixty-eight-year-old newspaper publisher a de facto historian of sorts as well.
Interesting story about the last linotype machine in regular use.
Read Why we're making the age of our journalism clearer at the Guardian (the Guardian)
To improve transparency and contextualise our journalism accurately even off platform, we’ve introduced two specific changes
I’ve noticed how they highlight these changes in the past. Pretty cool that they’re working at creating this sort of additional context.

I wonder how they’re doing the portion for the images on the social media cards. Are they simply replacing them outright or doing it programatically somehow?