Watched COVID-19: The Exponential Power of Now - With Prof. Nicholas Jewell by  Mathematical Sciences Research Institute (MSRI) Mathematical Sciences Research Institute (MSRI) from YouTube

Where are we with COVID-19, and how are mathematical models and statistics helping us develop strategies to overcome the burden of infections. Nicholas P. Jewell is Chair of Biostatistics and Epidemiology at the London School of Medicine and Tropical Medicine and Professor of the Graduate School (Biostatistics and Statistics) at the University of California, Berkeley.

A brief overview of some of the math and epidemiology for the coronavirus. A vaccine is going to be 12-18 months away at best. There are going to be multiple waves of this. Exponential growth is going to be the serious killer here. Reinfection may be a possible potential concern.

Terry Tao 2019-2020 Novel Coronavirus outbreak: mathematics of epidemics, and what it can and cannot tell us (Nicolas Jewell) ()

Mari Pfeiffer teaching a free session on how to create a message that attracts and converts website visitors into loyal customers

My friend (and phenomenal teacher) Mari Pfeiffer is stuck at home like the rest of us, but she’s putting her web development and business growth talents to work for those who are interested. 

She’s holding a free live session tomorrow at 10 am on YouTube geared toward a beginner audience who either already have websites or are beginning to consider designing and building one for their business. 

Several people have asked for help or advice on their business websites and so I thought, we’re all home, why not do this live? I’ll be talking about crafting a clear message that attracts and converts, and show how to put it together on your home page. I’ll also be taking any questions about website development in general.

Create a Message that attracts and converts website visitors into loyal customers

Bookmarked Genomic epidemiology of novel coronavirus (nextstrain.org)

Maintained by the Nextstrain team. Enabled by data from GISAID
Showing 838 of 838 genomes sampled between Dec 2019 and Mar 2020.

Latest Nextstrain COVID-19 situation report in English and in other languages. Follow @nextstrain for continual updates to data and analysis.

This phylogeny shows evolutionary relationships of hCoV-19 (or SARS-CoV-2) viruses from the ongoing novel coronavirus COVID-19 pandemic. This phylogeny shows an initial emergence in Wuhan, China, in Nov-Dec 2019 followed by sustained human-to-human transmission leading to sampled infections. Although the genetic relationships among sampled viruses are quite clear, there is considerable uncertainty surrounding estimates of transmission dates and in reconstruction of geographic spread. Please be aware that specific inferred transmission patterns are only a hypothesis.

Site numbering and genome structure uses Wuhan-Hu-1/2019 as reference. The phylogeny is rooted relative to early samples from Wuhan. Temporal resolution assumes a nucleotide substitution rate of 8 × 10^-4 subs per site per year. Full details on bioinformatic processing can be found here.

Phylogenetic context of nCoV in SARS-related betacoronaviruses can be seen here.

We gratefully acknowledge the authors, originating and submitting laboratories of the genetic sequence and metadata made available through GISAID on which this research is based. A full listing of all originating and submitting laboratories is available below. An attribution table is available by clicking on "Download Data" at the bottom of the page and then clicking on "Strain Metadata" in the resulting dialog box.

Read Please do a bad job of putting your courses online by Rebecca Barrett-Fox (anygoodthing.com)
I’m absolutely serious.
For my colleagues who are now being instructed to put some or all of the remainder of their semester online, now is a time to do a poor job of it. You are NOT building an online class. You are NOT teaching students who can be expected to be ready to learn online. And, most importantly, your class is NOT the highest priority of their OR your life right now. Release yourself from high expectations right now, because that’s the best way to help your students learn.
Bookmarked An Emergency Guide (of sorts) to Getting This Week’s Class Online in About an Hour (or so) (EduGeek Journal)
With all of the concern the past few weeks about getting courses online, many people are collecting or creating resources for how to get courses online in case of a last minute emergency switch to …
Bookmarked Teaching in the context of COVID-19 (Google Docs)
Welcome, this is a co-authored and rapidly evolving resource. Thank you to those who are helping! Send me a note if you have resources to share too and/or if you’ve found this resource helpful. Contributors include: Jacqueline Wernimont (Dartmouth, USA), Cathy N. Davidson (CUNY Grad College, USA)...
Bookmarked Keep on Teaching at VCU (altlab.vcu.edu)
Sometimes the unexpected happens. When it does, VCU will be prepared to keep on teaching and keep on learning. Were we to have a blizzard or some other surprise event, no doubt we will eventually experience a moment where all in-person academic meetings will need to transition to a remote format. If all or part of VCU instructional locations become unavailable or need to be closed, academic continuity can maintain course progression.
Read How to Self-Quarantine (nytimes.com)
Thousands who may have been exposed to the coronavirus have been asked to seclude themselves. It’s harder than it sounds.

“We ought to have a social compact: If you’re sick, whether you’ve got Covid-19 or not, you should separate yourself from society,” Mr. Gostin said. “That’s your part of the bargain, you’re doing it for your neighbors, your family and your community.”“In exchange,” he said, “we as a nation owe you the right to a humane period of separation, where we meet your essential needs like medicine, health care, food and sick pay.” 

Annotated on March 08, 2020 at 06:29PM