Bookmarked Webmention and Twitter by Manton ReeceManton Reece (manton.org)
After the Webmention session last weekend, I was inspired to revisit a quirk of Micro.blog’s Webmention implementation. Bridgy is an IndieWeb-friendly service commonly used to forward tweet replies via Webmention. If you were using Bridgy to connect your blog to Twitter, Micro.blog had been essent...
Bookmarked Whiki by Whitney TrettienWhitney Trettien (whitneyannetrettien.com)
This is an online commonplace book for Whitney Trettien. You're welcome to use these notes and reading lists to guide you in your own studies.
This has to be one of the baddest-ass things I’ve seen in months. I wish more people had public-facing commonplace books like this!

Bonus points that Whitney calls it a Whiki! 🙂

Bookmarked Affective Labor: The Need for, and Cost of, Workplace Equanimity by Lee Skallerup Bessette (er.educause.edu)
Efforts to move higher education instruction online en masse highlight the necessity of affective labor—work that a person does to suppress their feelings so as to create a desired feeling in others (in this case, a sense of calm)—as well as the toll it can take.
Suggested reading by the OERxDomains session: Taking Care by Lee Skallerup Bessette and Susannah McGowan
Bookmarked Modern Publishing: Digital Tools for Modern Publishing Processes (Modern Publishing)
The publication of scientific results is an essential task of scientists. The peer review of a publication by other scientists ensures its quality. Their publication is proof of their achievements. In addition, it provides the basis for discussions within a scientific community and serves as a basis for further findings. It is therefore desirable for the publication to be dissiminated and received as widely as possible.
Katharina Schulz in domains21 ()
Bookmarked From My to Me: Another history of the WWW, 2020 by Olia Lialina (INTERFACE CRITIQUE)
This article is an elaboration on the statements about the WWW, web design and personal websites I made in my recent talks and articles, as well as those included in the volume. As the editor (and probably the readers as well) noticed, as soon as I look for counter examples to new media products made following the cruel and hypocritical UX paradigm, I come up with a website – or more precisely, with a website of a particular genre – “the 90s GeoCities”.
This article was mentioned by Jim Groom several times at Domains21
Bookmarked Digital Mappa | an open-source DH platform (Digital Mappa)
Collect and mark up digital images and texts, link them together, annotate them, invite friends to collaborate, publish with one click.
This looks like a cool little project. I wonder how well this might make for a platform for a Domain of One’s Own/IndieWeb for Education?

I came across it via

which makes it sound like an off-label use case for their application. But given the functionality, it looks like it would fun/useful for those in the digital humanities space and could be a cool tool in one’s DoOO workshop.

Does anyone else have experience with it?

whitney trettien on Twitter: “I’m excited to share a digital edition of Susanna Collet’s 17th-century commonplace book, held at @morganlibrary. @zoe_braccia & I made it using @digitalmappa. It features a full transcription/facsimile & a searchable library of Collet’s source texts. https://t.co/VSCMmBhMS6 https://t.co/fyrbwS9kk1” ()

Bookmarked The Mountains of Pi by Richard Preston (The New Yorker)
The Chudnovsky brothers yearned to probe the mystery of pi, so they built their own supercomputer out of mail-order parts.
I know I’ve read this before. This is a good reminder to re-read it occasionally.

John Keilman on Twitter: “@rachsyme This one. It makes math make sense in a way nothing else has. https://t.co/VWST1TiQAZ”