Bookmarked Food As Power: an Alternative View by Jeremy Cherfas (ARROW@TU Dublin)
Abstract:

Lost, sometimes, in the more metaphorical interpretations of food and power is the basic crudity of food as stored energy. Muscles turn the chemical energy stored in food into mechanical energy, which enables work to be done. Power is the rate of doing work. Food, literally, is a store of power. In the wake of World War Two, Europe faced a shortage of coal and oil, the two most important sources of chemical energy that threatened to gum up the transport of goods from place to place. There was, however, no shortage of unemployed men. Geoffrey Pyke, the quintessential British boffin, pointed out that people are actually much more efficient than steam engines at converting chemical energy to mechanical energy. Pyke’s proposal, that trains could be moved by cyclo-tractors, locomotives powered by the muscular effort of twenty to thirty men, themselves powered by sugar, went nowhere. The paper looks at the background to Pyke’s proposal, its reception at the time and the future of food-powered machinery.

Bookmarked Unicyclic (unicyclic.com)

Unicyclic.com is a social feed reader, which means you can subscribe to feeds and then reply to, like, or share what you're reading from the reader.

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Unicyclic.com was created by Malcolm Blaney and is powered by a content management system called dobrado. You can also download the software from there and run it on your own server. If you need any help getting started, please use this contact form. If you're interested in following updates to the software please add my blog to your reader. Thanks for visiting!

Bookmarked The Top 3 Books to Get Started with Data Science Right Now (towardsdatascience.com)
Python For Data Analysis
Hands-On Machine Learning with Scikit-Learn, Keras, and TensorFlow is by far the best book to get started with machine learning.
Introduction to Statistical Learning.

🔖 Drag and Drop a document

Bookmarked Doc Drop: Drag and drop a document to annotate it. (docdrop.org)

Works with .pdf, .doc, .docx, .xls, .xlsx, .epub and .csv files.
.doc and .docx are converted to .pdf.
.xls and .xlsx are converted to .csv.

You can also annotate PDFs inside Google Drive by authorizing Hypothes.is within your Google account. Hypothes.is PDF Annotator will be listed under the "Open with" option for PDF files upon authorization. (Uninstall).

Scanned PDFs will be OCR’d
(please ensure text is horizontal).

The OCR service uses Tesseract, an open source library.
You may have better results using a professional tool (tutorial). The annotation functionality is enabled by Hypothes.is.
The code for this site is open source.

This is a personal project to explore different ideas and is maintained by Dan Whaley. I’d be delighted to hear any feedback at @dwhly.

The intention is to keep the site up and running, but no guarantee around the preservation of documents is made.
As an aside, annotations against PDFs or EPUBs with your Hypothes.is account, are discoverable on that PDF or EPUB regardless of its location (Background). As long as you have the original PDF somewhere, you'll always be able to see your annotations on it with Hypothes.is.

Bookmarked Readium (readium.org)
Open Source Technology for EPUB 3 and the Open Web Platform
The Readium Foundation is an Open Source Foundation collaboratively developing technology to accelerate the adoption of EPUB 3 and the Open Web Platform by the Digital Publishing Industry.
Bookmarked Making sense of modern recipes It's not your fault; even professional chefs encounter problems by Jeremy Cherfas (Eat This Podcast)
  1. Peter Hertzmann’s website à la carte will keep you occupied for hours. If you just want the paper we were talking about, here it is.
  2. Measure for Measure is the article I mentioned by Raymond Sokolov on why Americans measure by volume. It was published in Natural History magazine, July 1988, pp 80–83, and there seems also to be a version in the 1988 Proceedings of the Oxford Symposium on Food and Cooking. Good luck finding it online. Or, drop me a note …
  3. I was pleasantly surprised to find a facsimile of the original Betty Crocker’s Picture Cook Book at Amazon.

I want to read a few of these sources from Jeremy’s podcast–particularly the Hertzmann paper Modern Recipes: A Case of Miscommunication.

I had previously heard a reference (though I don’t recall where) to Fanny Farmer’s cookbook helping to popularize the American use of the cup measure. It certainly hasn’t done American cooking any favors.

Bookmarked à la carte by Peter Hertzmann (www.hertzmann.com)

This website, à la carte, started in 1999 as what was then know as an ‘e-zine’, an online magazine. It’s subject was French food and the French culinary experience. After nine years of posting a new, lengthy article each month, I found my interests broadening to a wider view of food, and my time available to write for the site reduced.

I wanted to spend more time producing general food interest videos, and by 2011, I was also posting a new, mostly original small-dish recipe each week. These posts came to an end in 2015. All 235 were gathered into a single, long (≈250,000 words) article.

In the future, expect to see the occasional new article or video as time allows. Rest assured, à la carte is alive and well, and its creator is busy expanding his knowledge to produce more content.

Bookmarked The Federation - a statistics hub (the-federation.info)
Node list and statistics for The Federation and Fediverse

Some screencaptures from the day I joined the statistics hub. My site dramatically changed some of the statistics:

This graph makes it look like my site has almost doubled the number of local posts for all WordPress nodes.
The addition of my node to the WordPress nodes has dramatically increased the number of local comments!
Of the WordPress nodes currently registered on the Federation, I’m leading for most posts and comments.

🔖 50 Ways to Cook a Carrot by Peter Hertzmann

Bookmarked 50 Ways to Cook a Carrot by Peter Hertzmann (Prospect Books)

Book cover featuring carrots

Peter Hertzmann's mission is simple - to make as many people as possible realise that if you can manage 50 ways of cooking one simple ingredient - the carrot - you can cook almost any dish, and cook it to perfection.

Every method presented in this book is approachable for both novice cooks and those with many years’ experience. He gives prescriptive advice, such as the salt concentration for pickling a carrot should be 3%, but his book is easy to put into action in the kitchen.

Some of the methods:

Simple slices — Matchsticks, julienne, or bâtonnets — Dicing — Roll cut — Grating carrots — Mandolins — Juicing carrots — Blending carrots — Immersion blenders — Processing carrots —

Making sauerkraut — A new-fangled pickling container — Salt fermented carrots — Miso-pickled carrots — Acid fermentation — Keeping pickles crisp — Acid fermented carrot pickles — Determining liquid quantity — Salt for acid pickling — Sugar for pickling — Pickling spices — Processing acid-fermented carrots

Modern, sous-vide cooking — Why sous-vide cooking works— Set-up your equipment — Choose your bag — Prepare your carrots — Cook your carrots

Peter Hertzmann is a passionate cook, and educator on food cooking, with years of teaching to his name. He is a professionally trained cook, completing ‘stage’ placements in several high end restaurants in France, then worked in restaurants, and produced complicated seven course menus as part of a team over many years. He has taught in prisons and colleges of further education. Peter lives in the USA and is a regular contributor to the Oxford Symposium on Food.

This should be released in mid-January 2020 in the United States. I can’t wait!

🔖 GLTR (glitter) v0.5

Bookmarked GLTR from MIT-IBM Watson AI Lab and HarvardNLP (gltr.io)
This demo enables forensic inspection of the visual footprint of a language model on input text to detect whether a text could be real or fake.