Bookmarked Whiki by Whitney TrettienWhitney Trettien (whitneyannetrettien.com)
This is an online commonplace book for Whitney Trettien. You're welcome to use these notes and reading lists to guide you in your own studies.
This has to be one of the baddest-ass things I’ve seen in months. I wish more people had public-facing commonplace books like this!

Bonus points that Whitney calls it a Whiki! 🙂

Bookmarked Affective Labor: The Need for, and Cost of, Workplace Equanimity by Lee Skallerup Bessette (er.educause.edu)
Efforts to move higher education instruction online en masse highlight the necessity of affective labor—work that a person does to suppress their feelings so as to create a desired feeling in others (in this case, a sense of calm)—as well as the toll it can take.
Suggested reading by the OERxDomains session: Taking Care by Lee Skallerup Bessette and Susannah McGowan
Bookmarked Modern Publishing: Digital Tools for Modern Publishing Processes (Modern Publishing)
The publication of scientific results is an essential task of scientists. The peer review of a publication by other scientists ensures its quality. Their publication is proof of their achievements. In addition, it provides the basis for discussions within a scientific community and serves as a basis for further findings. It is therefore desirable for the publication to be dissiminated and received as widely as possible.
Katharina Schulz in domains21 ()
Bookmarked From My to Me: Another history of the WWW, 2020 by Olia Lialina (INTERFACE CRITIQUE)
This article is an elaboration on the statements about the WWW, web design and personal websites I made in my recent talks and articles, as well as those included in the volume. As the editor (and probably the readers as well) noticed, as soon as I look for counter examples to new media products made following the cruel and hypocritical UX paradigm, I come up with a website – or more precisely, with a website of a particular genre – “the 90s GeoCities”.
This article was mentioned by Jim Groom several times at Domains21
Bookmarked Digital Mappa | an open-source DH platform (Digital Mappa)
Collect and mark up digital images and texts, link them together, annotate them, invite friends to collaborate, publish with one click.
This looks like a cool little project. I wonder how well this might make for a platform for a Domain of One’s Own/IndieWeb for Education?

I came across it via

which makes it sound like an off-label use case for their application. But given the functionality, it looks like it would fun/useful for those in the digital humanities space and could be a cool tool in one’s DoOO workshop.

Does anyone else have experience with it?

whitney trettien on Twitter: “I’m excited to share a digital edition of Susanna Collet’s 17th-century commonplace book, held at @morganlibrary. @zoe_braccia & I made it using @digitalmappa. It features a full transcription/facsimile & a searchable library of Collet’s source texts. https://t.co/VSCMmBhMS6 https://t.co/fyrbwS9kk1” ()

Bookmarked The Mountains of Pi by Richard Preston (The New Yorker)
The Chudnovsky brothers yearned to probe the mystery of pi, so they built their own supercomputer out of mail-order parts.
I know I’ve read this before. This is a good reminder to re-read it occasionally.

John Keilman on Twitter: “@rachsyme This one. It makes math make sense in a way nothing else has. https://t.co/VWST1TiQAZ”

Bookmarked Million-Dollar Murray by Malcolm GladwellMalcolm Gladwell (The New Yorker)
Why problems like homelessness may be easier to solve than to manage.
@MWConcertVideo in Chris on Twitter: “@rachsyme The New Yorker article “Million Dollar Murray” about how the broken American health care system spent a million dollars failing to save the life of a man living on the streets, when for a fraction of that they could have just put him in a group home. https://t.co/09ooKMCcG1″
Bookmarked Ricky Jay’s Magical Secrets by Mark SingerMark Singer (The New Yorker)
From 1993: The magician’s deft illusions flout reality, and he rejects the notion that magic is a suitable entertainment for children.
I think I’ve read this three or four times, but definitely a classic. The first time was around 2000 when I was at CAA just before I spoke to Ricky for the first time. My last reading  was right after Ricky passed.

Bookmarked "Harry Houdini Collection (Library of Congress) DLC" (archive.org)
Harry Houdini (1874-1926), master magician and escape artist, wrote in A Magician Among the Sprits, (1924) that he had "accumulated one of the largest libraries in the world on psychic phenomena, Spiritualism, magic, witchcraft, demonology, evil spirits, etc., some of the material going back as far as 1489." In 1927, through Houdini's bequest, the Library received 3,988 volumes from his collection. While strongest in nineteenth and twentieth century publications on spiritualism- Houdini doubted "if any one in the world has so complete a library on modern Spiritualism: - the Houdini Collection contains a number of magic books inscribed or annotated by well-known magicians. Leonard N. Beck. discusses significant items in "Things Magical in the Collections of the Rare Book Division," QJLC, v. 31, October 1974, p. 208-234. Also in the collection are prints, playbills, printed ephemera, periodicals, and many volumes of pamphlets on such topics as card tricks, mediums, hypnotism, handcuff escape methods, and chalk-talking. Of special note are over one hundred unannotated scrapbooks containing theatre notices and news clippings on subjects of personal interest. Houdini's theatrical collection was sold after his death to Messmore Kendall and later donated to the University of Texas.
A cool collection I ran across the other day.
Bookmarked One Year in the IndieWeb by Murray AdcockMurray Adcock (theAdhocracy)
The IndieWeb is a toolkit. A collection of ideas, technologies, and services that can help you solve some particularly tricky problems. If you're wanting to get involved in the IndieWeb, the first question you need to ask is: what problem do I have?