Replied to a tweet by christina (Twitter)
Brid.gy can handle that for you.
Read Automatically sending Webmentions from a static website by James Mead (jamesmead.org)
Using Actionsflow to automate the sending of Webmentions using webmention.app
This is an interesting way for static sites to automatically send webmentions using RSS.

Perhaps it’s something I might use in conjunction with my work with TiddlyWiki, MediaWiki, or my Obsidian.md notebook projects.

Replied to Jetpack 9.0 to Introduce New Feature for Publishing WordPress Posts to Twitter as Threads by Sarah Gooding (WordPress Tavern)
Jetpack 9.0, coming on October 6, will debut a new feature that allows users to share blog posts as Twitter threads in multiples tweets. A recent version of Jetpack introduced the ability to import and unroll tweetstorms for publishing inside a post. The 9.0 release will run it back the other way so the content originates in WordPress, yet still reaps all the same benefits of circulation on Twitter as a thread.
It’s awesome to see this feature added and that it expands the ability to do do this sort of workflow directly from one’s website instead of relying on posting to Twitter and relying on ThreadReaderApp to unroll a thread and post it to a WordPress site using the flexible Micropub specification. I’d love to see more POSSE (Post to your Own Site, Syndicate Elsewhere) syndication set ups within WordPress.

I’m hoping that future versions of this provide the Twitter permalinks for the syndicated copies there to be returned to my WordPress site for storage. In my case, I’m using the simple Syndication Links plugin which has storage and/or finds the storage location in WordPress to allow for the display of those permalinks in my post to indicate where I’ve syndicated the copies. This does two things: it’s a reminder of where my content lives elsewhere on the web (especially if I later want to go back and delete them, or to delete them if I’m deleting or making the original post private/unpublished) and it allows services like Brid.gy to find my original post and backfeed replies to the Twitter versions back into the comments section of my post using the Webmention spec (via the Webmention plugin and the Semantic Linkbacks plugin).

Bookmarked Getting Started With Webmention and NextJS by Monica PowellMonica Powell (aboutmonica.com)
This past week I had the pleasure of being on the Learn with Jason Show to show how to add Webmention functionality to a NextJS website. Webmentions let you pull tweets, other blogs, and other activity from around the web into your site? It was fun live pair programming the implementation of webmentions. Check out the video or read some of the highlights below!
Thanks for writing this up and bundling it with the video Monica! I can’t wait to see how you puzzle out sending Webmentions automatically as well.

Monica notes that they had issues with an .app TLD, which sounds a bit like Max’s previous issue with the .dev TLD. Any chance this is the case Ryan?

Thirteen: Backfeeding ideas with Brid.gy

Let’s say I syndicate a thought to Twitter. I can use Bri.gy to backfeed ideas and interactions with my Tweet back to my original in my digital notebook (where it’s most useful).  This helps outside ideas filter into and interact with my own ideas.

#HeyPresstoConf20


You knew ideas can have sex, right?!!

Twelve: Webmention for backlinks

For my backlinks I’m relying on the W3C recommendation Webmention spec which I’m implementing with the WordPress Webmention plugin. This allows me to cross link my own posts to look like “comments” or “replies”, but it allows others to ping me and interact with my public posts and their syndicated copies.

#HeyPresstoConf20


Need a primer on what webmentions are and what they can be used for? I’ve got you covered:

Webmentions: Enabling Better Communication on the Internet

https://boffosocko.com/2018/07/19/webmentions-enabling-better-communication-on-the-internet-2/

Replied to a tweet (Twitter)
I send Webmentions for reads and listens to notify authors, but I’m waiting for reading/podcast apps that will allow me to authenticate and make read/listen posts via micropub automatically, or versions that will send even generic notifications via webmention.

The nice part is that this sort of model allows the user to collect this data and send these notifications on an as-desired basis to the publisher.

RSVPed Attending Webmention + Next.js (with Monica Powell)
Episode Details
Thursday, October 1, 9:30 - 11:30 AM PDT
Guest: Monica Powell
This episode will air live at twitch.tv/jlengstorf!

Did you know that Webmentions let you pull tweets, other blogs, and other activity from around the web into your site? In this episode, Monica Powell teaches us how to add it to a Next.js site!
This looks intriguing. Great to see people that I don’t immediately recognize in the IndieWeb community doing live coding tutorials in the wild!

I’ve syndicated a copy of the event to IndieWeb Events if others want to join.

Replied to What does your operating system say about you? Spoiler - probably nothing by Olu Olu (olu online)
Operating systems, elitism, and everything (okay, only a few other things).
It sounded like you needed some webmentions, potentially for testing, so I thought I’d send you one. If you need any help troubleshooting or ideas for display, you’ll find lots of resources in the IndieWeb chat channels

If you need more, you can probably add lots quickly by connecting your site with Brid.gy to get reactions backfed from Twitter and other sites.

Has anyone ever considered building an email extension of the Webmention specification?

By that I mean, a sender attempts to send a mention and if there is no endpoint or the send fails, then as a back up, the sender parses the receiving site’s page for an h-card and if an email address exists, sends an email notification there instead?

Might be helpful for those who don’t yet have Webmention set up, but could act as a backup. Then when they have things working later, they could force manual mentions to recollect them? Also useful for those who’d like notifications, but don’t want to build infrastructure or who might not want to show comments on their site either.

Outline for Webmentions in Conjunction with Academic Citations

Replied to a tweet by Terence EdenTerence Eden (Twitter)
I’ve noted before how Altmetric does what some would call backfeed, though I’m not sure what or how their mechanism works other than some heavy search and extreme processing from social media platforms.

Pingbacks are essentially dead and in personal experience some of the few sites that still support them are in academia, but they’re relatively rare and have horrible UI in the best of times. Webmention is a much better evolutionary extension of the pingback idea and have been rapidly growing since before the spec was standardized by the W3C. 

I’ve sketched out how individual academics could use their own websites and publish pre-prints and syndicate them to pre-print servers and even to their final publications while still leveraging Webmentions to allow their journal articles, books, other works, to accept and receive webmentions from other web publications as well as social media platforms that reference them. 

I think the Microformats process is probably the best standardized way of doing this with classes and basic HTML and there is a robust offering of parsers that work in a variety  of programming languages to help get this going. To my mind the pre-existing h-cite is probably the best route to use along with the well-distributed and oft-used <cite> tag with authorship details easily fitting into the h-card structure. 

As an example, if Zeynep were to cite Tessie, then she could write up her citation in basic HTML with a few microformats and include a link to the original paper (with a rel=”canonical” or copies on pre-print servers or other journal repositories with a rel=”alternate” markup). On publishing a standard Webmention would be sent and verified and Tessie could have the option of displaying the citation on her website in something like a “Citation” section. The Post Type Discovery algorithm is reasonably sophisticated enough that I think a “citation” like this could be included in the parsing so as to help automate the way that these are found and displayed while still providing some flexibility to both ends of the transaction.

Ideally all participants would also support sending salmentions so that the online version of the “officially” published paper, say in Nature, that receives citations would forward any mentions back to the canonical version or the pre-print versions.

Since most of the basic citation data is semantic enough in mark up the receiver with parsing should be able to designate any of the thousands of journal citation formats that they like to display any particular flavor on the receiving website, which may be it’s own interesting sub-problem.

Of course those wishing to use schema.org or JSON-LD could include additional markup for those as well as parsing if they liked.

Perhaps I ought to write a longer journal article with a full outline and diagrams to formalize it and catch some of the potential edge cases.

Replied to a post by Bix (bix.blog)
“If your software fails you,” writes Evgeny Kuznetsov, “it’s not always an indication that something is wrong with the protocol.” Which might be why my webmentions post this replies to begins, “Webmentions are strange, at least in how the WordPress plugin handles them.” Although, upon doing some reading, it’s my understanding that trackback does send a post excerpt, etc., although it’s optional; only pingback and webmention send just the URL.
In case no one has pinged you about it elsewhere… Your WordPress webmentions, pingbacks, and trackbacks will have a lot more context if you use the Semantic Linkbacks plugin in combination with the Webmention plugin. There’s an effort to unifiy them into a single plugin, but they were developed separately. The Webmention plugin only does the notification, the Semantic Linkbacks plugin does the additional work of processing the sending page and displaying some appropriate context. I think once you’re using it, you’ll realize that the UX/UI for Webmentions (as well as the older pingbacks and trackbacks) are much improved.

If you have questions/problems with them or want to chat with the developers on potentially improving them, I’ll invite you to join the IndieWeb WordPress chat: https://chat.indieweb.org/wordpress/.