I’m planning on proposing an OER or other book related session at the upcoming IndieWebCamp New Haven next weekend. If you’re interested or want to propose other ideas for or , I hope you’ll join us either in-person or remotely.

Not sure what to expect at a camp? Here are some additional details for both in-person and remote attendance.

📅 Micropub and WordPress: Custom Posting Applications at WordCamp Santa Clarita Valley 2019

Details

Come for two days of WordCamp Santa Clarita Valley on Friday and Saturday April 5 & 6, 2019, featuring an IndieWeb-related talk by me on Saturday afternoon.
 
I will be at WordCamp both days to chat with participants about the IndieWeb and implementing its principles and related plugins using WordPress in addition to giving a featured talk on Saturday afternoon.

Micropub and WordPress: Custom Posting Applications

The W3C recommended Micropub specification (2017) allows developers to create custom posting applications for a wide variety of data targeting any content management system that supports the spec.
I will provide an overview of the setup and use of the available plugin and endpoint for WordPress. I’ll also provide a beginner walk-though for a variety of client applications like Quill, Teacup, OwnYourGram, OwnYourSwarm, Omnibear, and others that allow one to easily post status updates, bookmarks, likes, check-ins/location data, photos, and more directly to their WordPress sites.
We’ll also talk about how developers can create custom posting interfaces to drastically simplify content creation and posting for clients in ways that can be even simpler and more flexible than working with Gutenberg.

When

My talk on “Micropub and WordPress: Custom Posting Applications” will take place on  from

Where

College of the Canyons
Dr. Dianne G. Van Hook University Center
26455 Rockwell Canyon Road
Santa Clarita, California 91355
USA

Tickets

This post is an “indie event” so feel free to RSVP by adding yourself in the comments section below or by sending a webmention so I’ll know to expect you, but be sure to purchase tickets in advance. General admission is $40 and includes:

  • Two days of sessions of everything WordPress — design, development, e-commerce, marketing and more!
    • Day 1 (Friday, April 5) will focus on getting started with WordPress and WooCommere;
    • Day 2 (Saturday, April 6) offers a full slate of WordPress content spread across three simultaneous tracks;
  • Lunch on Friday & Saturday, including snacks and refreshments;
  • Swag and sponsor goodies; and
  • Afterparty Saturday (details to follow)

Any questions? Respond below or ask me in the IndieWeb chat. I look forward to seeing everyone there!

RSVPed Attending IndieWebCamp New Haven 2019
IndieWebCamp New Haven is the first in Elm City, happening at Southern Connecticut State University, Participants are welcome to join the community to explore how owning your data and controlling the web helps to protect under-served communities.

Attending remotely.

Replied to Context challenges between and social media silos by David MeadDavid Mead (David John Mead)

My utopian dream of owning all my content would be to post it on my blog first. Syndicating to whatever social media silo's I choose afterwards.

This isn't a reality as some of these silos (Instagram) don't allow posting apart through their apps.

This forces me to accept their context for my content if I consume it into my site, from them.

This context piece David Mead is talking about is a far bigger issue than most people might give it credit for. Most don’t even notice it because their lives are split up so tragically online that they simply have never had any other experiences. Seeing things from a different perspective, I can guarantee that they’re missing out.

I’m reminded of chef Alton Brown who regularly gives the cooking advice that one should never buy unitasker kitchen tools, but instead get multi-taskers that can do a variety of jobs. This typically cuts down on a lot of the mess and fuss in one’s kitchen and generally makes it a nicer place to prepare food. Nine times out of ten the unitasker is a much more expensive and infrequently used tool and ultimately gets lost in a junk drawer. More often than not, there are one or multi-taskers that can do a better job for far less. 

In some sense social silos like Twitter (with functionality for notes and bookmarks), Instagram (photos), Facebook (notes, photos, links, etc.), Swarm (locations and photos), etc. are just like those unitaskers in the kitchen. They only do one (or sometimes a very few) thing(s) well and generally just make for a messier and more confused social media life. They throw off the mise en place of my life by scattering everything around, making my own content harder to find and use beneficially. On my own website, I have all of the functionalities of these four examples–and lots more–and its such a much better experience for me.

As time goes by and I’m able to post more content types (and cross link them via replies) on my own website and even to others’, I do notice that the increased context on my website actually makes it more interesting and useful. In particular, I can especially see it when using my “On This Day” functionality or various archive views where I can look back at past days/months/years to see what I had previously been up to. This often allows me to look at read posts, bookmark posts, photos, locations to put myself back in the context of those prior days. Since all of the data is there and viewable in a variety of linear and non-linear manners, I can more easily see the flow of the ideas, where they came from and where they  may be going. I can also more easily search for and find ideas by a variety of meta data on my site that would probably have never been discoverable on disparate and unrelated social sites. That article I read in July and posted to Twitter could never be grouped again with the related photo on Instagram or the two other bookmarked journal articles I put on Diigo or the annotations I made with Hypothes.is. But put all that on my own website, and what a wonderful exploding world of ideas I can immediately recall and continue exploring at a later date. In fact, it is this additional level of aggregation and search that makes my website that much more of a valuable digital commonplace book.

I’ll note, as a clever bit of of search and serendipity to underscore the discussion of context, it’s nearly trivial for me to notice that exactly two years ago today I was also analogizing social media and food culture. Who knows where those two topics or even related ones from my site will take me next?

IndieWebCamp Online 2019 and What to Expect at Camps

Over the weekend, I attended my first online-only IndieWebCamp thanks in large part to some excellent planning and execution by Eddie Hinkle, Greg McVerry, and David Shanske. I’ve attended many camps both in person and remotely but somehow managed to miss that first IndieWebCamp Online in 2014.

I remember a few years back hosting my very first IndieWebCamp in Los Angeles. I had only done a small handful of HomeBrew Website Club meetups up to that point, so I was excited that the community rallied around the camp to help make it what it was particularly since I didn’t have half a clue. At the time, I remember being excited that one of the co-founders of the BarCamp concept was attending not only the first BarCamp I had ever hosted, but had ever attended–sure, no pressure there, right?!. While there, I was also floored to see one of the most experienced web designers in the world ever-so-patiently sit down with several people on a volunteer basis and help them learn to write raw HTML for the first time to make their very first websites. The entire thing was a mix of kindness, excitement, and exhilaration I’ve only ever seen  and experienced at IndieWebCamps. 

This past weekend was not very different from that first camp. Over the weekend, however, I did hear from a few folks who said that they had issues finding and accessing resources to make their camp experiences like the ones I’ve experienced. Sadly, some of them gave up altogether. It’s often the case that the old hands and organizers, even with the best intentions, can’t think of everything or remember what it was like before they knew what they know now. In searching through the IndieWeb wiki, I noticed that there were few resources directed specifically towards first time campers. While there’s a LOT there for newcomers (maybe even too much), all of it is very spread out and takes too much time and effort to sift through quickly, so I spent some time at the end of camp to put together a quick overview of what to expect at an IndieWebCamp as well as some technology basics for campers and people new to the IndieWeb. Naturally there are links to other resources for those who want more, but hopefully it’s got the immediate resources that many will be looking for.

If you’re an “old hand” I’d ask you to read over the page and add anything I may have missed or which could assuredly be improved, clarified, or even shortened.

If you’re new to the game, I’d welcome you to let us know what other things might worry you, you’re unsure of, or don’t get going into such a camp or which might not be clear on that page or any of the other pages one might access when first approaching any of the camps and their resources. (You can give me your feedback directly in the comments below or via your favorite mode of communication. I’ll add them and answers to the wiki on yours and others’ behalf.)

Hopefully over time, we’ll have some better resources for first time campers to have the same sort of first time camp experiences I managed to get lucky enough to stumble into myself that first time and had yet again this weekend.

See you at the next camp!

👓 ad-hoc sessions | IndieWeb

Bookmarked ad-hoc sessions - IndieWeb (indieweb.org)
ad-hoc sessions is the idea (which needs a better name) that we host single topic sessions every month or two online that the community can gather around and discuss.

I do like the idea of doing something like this.

It also may be worthwhile to do some regular WordPress set up sessions on a monthly basis the way we often do at camps.

Read a tweet by Larry SangerLarry Sanger (Twitter)

Larry, there are a large number of videos about the IndieWeb available. I’ll make a few recommendations from the broadest and shortest to the most specific and longer given what I suspect about you and your background.

This short 13 minute video Why We Need the IndieWeb by Tantek Çelik from 2014 has some of the best background, history, and broad philosophy.

A longer version of this video with more detail is his The once and future IndieWeb.

Since I’m sure you’re aware of much of the history and some of the problems (though who couldn’t use a good reveiw), you may want to start with more practical concerns and for this there are several, roughly equivalent videos by Jeremy Keith that would be an excellent overview for you including Taking Back The Web (Webstock ‘18):

The following are similar, but excellent as well: Taking Back the Web and  Building Blocks of the IndieWeb.

And finally, bringing things closest to home for you and potentially applying these pieces to a WordPress site, knowing that is what you use, I’ve got a (less exciting and more didactic) video Setting up WordPress for IndieWeb Use that walks through adding all of these pieces to a WordPress site in a step-by-step manner. 

Please let me know if I can be of further help.

📅 RSVP for IndieWebCamp Online 2019

RSVPed Attending IndieWebCamp Online 2019
IndieWebCamp Online 2019 is a gathering for independent web creators of all kinds, from graphic artists, to designers, UX engineers, coders, hackers, to share ideas, actively work on creating for their own personal websites, and build upon each others creations.

I’ve already started brainstorming sessions and am glad that you can propose them online already in preparation for Friday!

And there’s always something magical about seeing an event on the web and being able to RSVP to it directly from my own website and having the site show my response. If only the rest of the world worked so well…

👓 Update: Creating and managing a lifestream as an Early Career Academic | Kay Oddone

Read Update: Creating and managing a lifestream as an Early Career Academic by Kay OddoneKay Oddone (Linking Learning)

I began this year with the plan to create a lifestream blog – something that curated observations, discoveries, articles, images, music – in fact any digital artefact – that I encountered or spent time thinking about as I started my role as lecturer at QUT here in Brisbane Australia.

You can read about the reasons for this decision, and what I hoped it might achieve in my earlier post, but I am taking time to say that my plan has taken a left-hand turn, and being the ‘perpetually in beta, flexible, digitally fluent’ (!) person that I am, I am going with this to see where it takes me.

I had spent some time setting up the If This Then That (IFTTT) applets which I hoped would automate the process of recording my lifestream, and in doing so, I have made some discoveries.

Wahoo! Someone else out there in the ether(net) has started a digital commonplace book and she’s documenting how’s she’s doing it. I love that she’s framed doing it as part of her professional growth.

It looks like Kay has run up against some of the same problems I’ve seen in the past (and for which I’ve found some useful solutions). It would appear that she’s at least come across the IndiWeb wiki and knows about Greg (I can tell from her commonplace!) but perhaps she’s not run into examples by Aaron Davis or Ian O’Byrne yet.

I’m going to have to propose a commonplace session at IndieWebCamp Online this weekend (and maybe for PressEd)… who’s game? Kay, if you’d like to join us there (or in chat anytime), we can probably get a group of people to talk about what they’ve built, how they did it, what they want to do, and how to improve on it all.

🎧 PressED WordPress and Education twitter conference | Radio #EDUtalk 27-02-19 | EduTalk

Listened to Radio 27-02-19: PressED WordPress and Education twitter conference from EDUtalk

Pat Lockley talking  about PressEd the conference about WordPress run completely on twitter. PressEd uncovers many aspects of the use of WordPress in all areas of education.

We discussed some of the aspects and features of running a conference on twitter the previous and upcoming conferences. Pat invites anyone who uses WordPress in any area of education to submit a proposal to the conference.

While listening to John Johnston on this topic, I couldn’t help but think how cool it would be if PressEd, an education related conference that is held online via Twitter, could actually be held on WordPress itself. There was a quick mention by Pat Lockley about their consideration of using the P2 theme to effect this, but they’re right in that P2 has been left behind on the side of the road.

I think that such a conference could be held online and actually use WordPress; it would require more of the participants to be using IndieWeb philosophies and technology/plugins like Webmention and perhaps one of the more modern feed readers that are using Microsub.

Alternately, I could see a place where a platform like IndieWeb.xyz could be leveraged as a location to which all the participants could syndicate their content to a particular sub there (it has the ability to force Webmentions for people who can’t send/receive them yet) and then act as the reader in which the conference was taking place. In this sense IndieWeb.xyz would act a bit like an impromptu planet to aggregate all the conversation. I haven’t looked, but if IndieWeb.xyz also had RSS or other feeds coming back out of individual subs, then it would be a bit more like a traditional planet and people could subscribe in their feed reader of choice, and with WebSub or an occasional manual refresh, a conference like this could be done directly from WordPress (or honestly any IndieWeb friendly platform/website) and have much the same impact. In fact, perhaps a bit more impact since all the presenters and participants would and could have archival copies of the conference on their own websites at the end of the day and the ephemeral nature of such an online conference could tend to disappear.

Incidentally, I could almost hear the gears turning in John’s head as I’m sure he was thinking much the same thing. He carefully restrained himself and managed to keep the conversation on track though.

Now I’ll have to brainstorm an IndieWeb for Education using WordPress proposal for this year’s pending PressEd Conference if there’s time left.

I loved the short snippet at the end of the episode where Pat Lockley gave a brief bio on his Twitter handle and domain name. It reminds me a bit of the podcast My URL Is, which I hope comes back with more episodes soon.

The bookmarking service CiteULike is shutting down on March 30, 2019 after a 15 year run. While some may turn to yet-another-silo or walled garden I highly recommend going IndieWeb and owning all of your own bookmarks on your own website.

I’ve been doing this for several years now and it gives me a lot more control over how much meta data I can add, change, or modify as I see fit. Let me know if I can help you do something similar.

I’m continually astounded by Matthias Pfefferle’s (or I might alternately tag: @pfefferle@notiz.blog) excellent work with the ActivityPub plugin for WordPress! It’s simply brilliant that my IndieWeb powered WordPress website can act much like a standalone version of Mastodon and reasonably federate with other platforms that use the ActivityPub protocol.

You can follow me at @chrisaldrich@boffosocko.com and apparently read my 8,000+ posts via Mastodon and other platforms.

While the plugin doesn’t support everything (yet) and doesn’t compete with Mastodon, Friendi.ca, or GNU.social, it extends WordPress with some reasonably solid fediverse features. I can’t wait to see how it continues to grow and add additional functionality.

Managed to get a talk proposal together for WordCamp Santa Clarita on the topic of IndieWeb and WordPress (geared toward a general audience). I also submitted an idea for a lightning talk on the relatively new Micropub spec from the W3C and how it can be used in conjunction with WordPress to quickly and easily post a variety of different content types to the platform.

I can’t wait to attend this new camp just North of Los Angeles!

#WCSCV

Reminder: IndieWebCamp Austin (& streaming) is this Weekend 2/23-24

Here’s a quick reminder that IndieWebCamp Austin is this weekend. If you’re in the , , or spaces and can’t attend in person, there should be some interesting conversations and work that can be done to participate remotely (via chat, video, etc.) to help you improve and better use your personal website.

We welcome anyone who is interested, so feel free to pass the invitation along to your colleagues, students, and friends who are interested in using their websites as more than “just a business card” or “just a blog”. Even if you don’t yet have a domain or web hosting, show up and we’ll see what we can help you create over the weekend. 

Feel free to come with ideas, propose an online session (maybe?!!), or just watch, listen, and absorb ideas from others. Find out more about what you can do with a simple domain name and website.

Perhaps sometime in the future we ought to have an IndieWebCamp specifically for the education space?! Let me know if you’re interested in helping to organize one.

Of course if you can’t join us this weekend, there is an IndieWebCamp Online coming up on 

Don’t worry if you can’t RSVP this late, just show up… We all hope to see you there!


👤 Stephen Downes,William Ian O’ByrneGreg McVerryKimberly Hirsh,  John JohnstonAaron DavisCathie LeBlanc,   Kathleen FitzpatrickNate AngellRobin DeRosa, Jon Udell, Dan CohenTim OwensTaylor JadinMark GrabeRick WysockiDoug HoltonJim GroomAnelise H. ShroutJeffrey KeeferJeremy DeanAudrey WattersDan ScottAntonio Sánchez-PadialMiriam AveryTom CritchlowKen BauerKim HansenLarry Sanger