👓 After 5 years and $3M, here’s everything we’ve learned from building Ghost | Ghost

Read After 5 years and $3M, here's everything we've learned from building Ghost by John O'Nolan, Hannah Wolfe (Ghost)
It's always fun to use these milestones to take a step back and reflect on the journey so far. On previous birthdays I've talked about revenue milestones and product updates, but this year I'm going to focus more on all the things we've learned since we started.

In reading this, I took a look at downloading and self-hosting a copy of Ghost for myself, but the barrier and work involved was beyond my patience to bother with. For an open source project that prides itself on user experience, this seemed at odds. Perhaps this is playing itself out better for the paid monthly customers? But in this case, it doesn’t support many of the pieces of infrastructure I find de rigueur now: Webmention support and microformats which I understand they have no plans to support anytime soon.

Looking at their project pages and site though it does seem like they’ve got a reasonable layout and sales pitch for a CMS project, though it’s probably a bit too much overkill on selling when it could be simpler. Perhaps it might be a model for creating a stronger community facing page for the WithKnown open source project, presuming the education-focused corporate side continues as a status quo?

They did seem to be relatively straightforward in selling themselves against WordPress and what they were able to do and not do. I’m curious what specifically they’re doing to attract journalists? I couldn’t find anything specifically better than anything else on the market that would set it apart other than their promise on ease-of-use.

There were some interesting insights for those working within the IndieWeb community as well as businesses which might build themselves upon it.

Highlights:

Decentralised platforms fundamentally cannot compete on ease of setup. Nothing beats the UX of signing up for a centralised application.

We spent a very long time trying to compete on convenience and simplicity. This was our biggest mistake and the hardest lesson to learn.

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Virtual Homebrew Website Club Meetup on May 30, 2018

Are you building your own website? Indie reader? Personal publishing web app? Or some other digital magic-cloud proxy? If so, come on by and join a gathering of people with likeminded interests. Bring your friends who want to start a personal web site. Exchange information, swap ideas, talk shop, help work on a project…

Everyone of every level is welcome to participate! Don’t have a domain yet? Come along and someone can help you get started and provide resources for creating the site you’ve always wanted.

This virtual HWC meeting is for site builders who either can’t make a regular in-person meeting or don’t yet have critical mass to host one in their area. It will be hosted on Google Hangouts.

Homebrew Website Club Meetup – Virtual Americas

Time:  to
Location: Google Hangouts (link to Hangout TBD)

  • 4:30 – 5:30 pm (Pacific): (Optional) Quiet writing hour
    Use this time to work on your project, ask for help, chat, or do some writing before the meeting.
  • 5:30 – 7:00 pm (Pacific): Meetup

More Details

Join a community of like-minded people building and improving their personal websites. Invite friends that want a personal site.

  • Work with others to help motivate yourself to create the site you’ve always wanted to have.
  • Ask questions about things you may be stuck on–don’t let stumbling blocks get in the way of having the site you’d like to have.
  • Finish that website feature or blog post you’ve been working on
  • Burn down that old website and build something from scratch
  • Share what you’ve gotten working
  • Demos of recent breakthroughs

Skill levels: Beginner, Intermediate, Advanced

Any questions? Need help? Need more information? Ask in chat: http://indiewebcamp.com/irc/today#bottom

RSVP

Add your optional RSVP in the comments below; by adding your indie RSVP via webmention to this post; or by RSVPing to one of the syndicated posts below:
Indieweb.org event: https://indieweb.org/events/2018-05-30-homebrew-website-club#Virtual_Americas

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👓 Why We Need the IndieWeb | Cathie LeBlanc

Bookmarked Why We Need the #IndieWeb: A Short History by Cathie LeBlanc (Desert of My Real Life)
Members of the IndieWeb community are building tools to try to make moving your web presence off the corporate web easier, giving you more control over your digital identity. I like to think of the IndieWeb as a way of trying to regain the democratic ideals of early Web 2.0. IndieWeb wants us all to have a web presence that we own and control. We can still use tools like Twitter and Facebook to bring us together but we publish our content first on our own web sites and then decide where we want to share them. An example is this post. I’m writing it on http://cathieleblanc.com/blog. But I want others to see it. So after publishing it on my own site with my self-hosted installation of WordPress, I will put a link to it on Facebook and on Twitter for others to see. Facebook and Twitter serve as today’s interactive hotlist. Everything old is new again.

​​​​​​​​​

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UI suggestions for watches

Filed an Issue dshanske/indieweb-post-kinds (GitHub)
Adds support for responding to and interacting with other sites using the standards developed by the Indieweb Community

It would be nice if there were a way to distinguish between various watch types to differentiate between films, television, and internet based streaming media — perhaps with a data field and a toggle along with three appropriate icons for each of these rather than the single watch icon now (a generic “play” button).

Further, most of the current meta data fields are fairly solid for the most often used fields, but I often find that it would be nice to have fields for Season # and Episode # for television shows.

The last “big” piece that would be nice to have is a quickly usable ratings field of sorts so one could provide a rating 1-5, 1-10, or 1-100 rating field? Maybe it could be a simple numerical data field that calculates/displays a rough 5 star-based scale? h-review markup could also come into play here as well, though it would be nice to capture the raw data even if there is no UI display built for it.

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An IndieWeb Podcast: Episode 5 “Indieweb Summit and More”

Episode 5: IndieWeb Summit and More


Running time: 1 h 18m 25s | Download (24.4 MB) | Subscribe by RSS

Summary: With the IndieWeb Summit coming up at the end of June in Portland, David Shanske and I discuss it, participation, and other parts of the IndieWeb community.

 

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Show Notes

Related Articles and Posts

Related IndieWeb wiki pages

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On the mission of the IndieWeb movement

What you see is what you get (WYSIWYG) is fine when you’re given all the functionality and control you need or want. It’s when you have additional needs and desires than the tools allow that WYSIWYG becomes a problem.

Social media WYSIWYG platforms like SnapChat, Twitter, Facebook/Instagram, et al. have become a problem as they’re not allowing us the control, flexibility, and privacy we would all like to have while they pursue their own agendas.

In these terms, the general mission of the IndieWeb movement is to be the proverbial simple text editor meant to give everyone increasingly easier, direct control over their own identity and communication on the open internet.

hat tip: Greg McVerry

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👓 Webmention Plugin for Craft CMS | GitHub

Read matthiasott/webmention (GitHub)
Webmention Plugin for Craft CMS

Surprisingly interesting reading here. The Craft CMS has some interesting UI and settings that aren’t included in the WordPress plugin for Webmention. I do like some of the thoughts and ideas that were included in it. The tail end also gives a little snapshot of its history and antecedents, which I find nice for future historians.

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Reply to 50cent tweet about Instagram abuse

Replied to a tweet by 50cent (Twitter)

Why rely on yet another corporation that may do the same? Come join the #IndieWeb!
#silosgonnasilo #ownyourdata

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An Indieweb Podcast: Episode 4 “Webmentions and Privacy”

Episode 4: Webmentions and Privacy


Running time: 1 h 16m 00s | Download (23.8 MB) | Subscribe by RSS

Summary: With the GDPR regulations coming into effect in Europe on May 25th, privacy seems to be on everyone’s mind. This week, we tackle what webmentions are, using them for backfeed, and the privacy implications.

 

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Show Notes

Related Articles and Posts

Related IndieWeb wiki pages

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👓 Webmention for ProcessWire Update | gRegorLove

Read Webmention for ProcessWire Update by gRegor MorrillgRegor Morrill (gregorlove.com)
Version 2.0.0 of the Webmention for ProcessWire module is released. Webmention is a web standard that enables conversations across the web, a powerful building block that is used for a growing federated network of comments, likes, reposts, and other rich interactions across the decentralized social ...

 

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There’s been some recent revival of chat about fragmentions and the fragmentioner within the IndieWeb community which enable the ability to more easily highlight and annotate individual portions of a web page and target them directly via URL.

This caused me to take a look at where the conversations on webmentions went within the Hypothesis project. Unless they’re hiding offline or somewhere else, it would appear that they’ve stalled, though I have a feeling that it could be an interesting notification method for Hypothesis to indicate to a site that it’s been highlighted or annotated. Also given that the Webmention spec is a W3C recommendation as of January 2017 compared to its status in 2014 when the topic was last brought up on the GitHub repo.

As a result of the above, if they’re free, I’d love to extend an invitation to Dan Whaley (t), Jon Udell (t), Jeremy Dean (t), Nate Angell (t), or anyone else working on the Hypothes.is project to join us in Portland this June 26-27 for the annual IndieWebSummit / IndieWebCamp.  I highly suspect there will be some heavy interest in the topics of open ways of annotating, highlighting, and notifying websites as well as UI/UX discussion around this area which we can all continue to expand and improve upon. And naturally there are sure to be a broad area of other topics at the summit that will be of interest in addition to these.

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🔖 Notes on the future of the WithKnown Commercial Product

Bookmarked Notes on the future of the WithKnown Commercial Product

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Reply to Anna Holmes’ post about using cheese as a bookmark

Replied to a tweet by Anna Holmes (Twitter)

Move over chicken. I can already see someone in the IndieWeb community creating a Cheese post kind to begin cheesemarking content on the internet.

 

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👓 Privacy | David Shanske

Read Privacy by David ShanskeDavid Shanske (David Shanske)
I admit to a certain amount of frustration on the subject of privacy lately. It seems, in all aspects of my life, both personal and professional, the new data privacy regulations that the EU rolls out May 25th are a theme in every discussion.

Some interesting thoughts on personal data and privacy. I can’t wait to talk to David about some of this in greater depth in our next podcast episode.

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