Replied to What does your operating system say about you? Spoiler - probably nothing by Olu Olu (olu online)
Operating systems, elitism, and everything (okay, only a few other things).
It sounded like you needed some webmentions, potentially for testing, so I thought I’d send you one. If you need any help troubleshooting or ideas for display, you’ll find lots of resources in the IndieWeb chat channels

If you need more, you can probably add lots quickly by connecting your site with Brid.gy to get reactions backfed from Twitter and other sites.

Replied to What I'm Excited About with Joining the Indie Web by Tracy DurnellTracy Durnell (Cascadia Inspired)
I've always been about having my own site instead of relying on companies, but the IndieWeb represents a new philosophy and approach to using the internet.
This just tickles me pink.

And now we’re going to have to nerd out on digital gardens and commonplace books too…

Replied to Why I Started Microblogging by Bryan Bryan (Bryan Sebesta)
So, I’ve started to microblog. I was inspired by Alan Jacobs’ recent article, getting back to the open web via micro.blog. One of the big reasons he supports starting a microblog this way is is because he owns the content; it’s part of his own domain, his turf. And that’s appealing to me. Ad...
Welcome to the game Bryan! Curious why you’re hosting your microblog separate from your main site instead of running them both from WordPress (not that you need to/have to)?

I’ve enjoyed linkblogging. When I read something, I can share the link along with a quote or reflection on how it affected me. It’s a great space to think out loud. 

Annotated on August 05, 2020 at 01:51PM

As Austin Kleon notes, blogging is a great way to discover what you have to say. My microblog has given me a chance to have thoughts, and this longer blog has given me a space to figure out what it means–to discover what it is I have to say. In other words, my microblog is where I collect the raw materials; my blog is where I assemble them into questions and, perhaps, answers. It’s a place where I figure out what I really think. 

Annotated on August 05, 2020 at 01:54PM

Replied to a tweet by Ian BrownIan Brown (Twitter)
#IndieWeb interoperability FTW!
Replied to a tweet by Tracy DurnellTracy Durnell (Twitter)
Tracy, you’re not shouting into the void. If you’re interested, a few of us are hosting a free pop-up session that will cover that issue (and a lot more) in just a few weeks: Getting Started with WordPress, an IndieWebCamp Pop-up Session. Also happy to discuss it at any of the upcoming Homebrew Website Club Meetups too!
Replied to a tweet by Kevin TofelKevin Tofel (Twitter)
If you’ve got your own domain name and can export your content, that’s 100% IndieWeb. The rest is gravy. The key is to have a site do what you want it to. Join us for regular meetups/camps/chat if you’d like to work at adding other pieces you find useful.
Liked There's a light over in the IndieWeb space by Jason YavorskaJason Yavorska (metaluna.io)

In the end, I'm really glad the IndieWeb is out there as a kind of light in the darkness of what can otherwise seem like a more or less completely corporate daily web experience. It's weird in a good way. It's not corporate at all. It's rough around the edges and not tuned for maximum engagement. There are interesting people.. I've already connected with a few who are doing all kinds of creative things.

I feel like I've found a cozy little corner where people are following their passion, connecting with each other, and building creative things together. Long live the IndieWeb!

Replied to Webmentions and Campfires by Kevin CunninghamKevin Cunningham (kevincunningham.co.uk)
Over in the garden, I’ve started a section on webmentions - including how Lauro (@laurosilvacom) and I got them up and running on our Gatsby blogs. We streamed that and I’ll link to the video when it’s available. Equally, I’ve linked to some excellent examples and posts over there.

I want these posts to be part of a conversation rather than a one-sided proclamation from the roof-tops. Using webmentions to poll for replies on Twitter and other blogs seems like a good start.

What other ways can we stop ourselves standing in dark rooms and shouting into the void? How can we light campfires and create spaces for conversation that are welcoming and mutually beneficial?
Kevin, I like your ideas here and there are many of us who have been discussing it in various nooks of the internet over the past couple of years. It’s a movement and a discussion that has been slowly brewing, but seems to be coming to a boil.

While some of these ideas sound romantic at present with minimal penetration and implementation, we’ll definitely need to be cognizant of how they grow and building tools to mitigate abuses in the future as they become more common. No one wants Webmention to become a vector for spam and harassment the way it’s poorly designed and implemented predecessors like Pingback or Trackbacks were.

While the IndieWeb seems to be the largest hub of this conversation so far, especially for the technical portions, it’s also been distributed across multiple platforms and personal websites and wikis. If you haven’t come across the IndieWeb you may appreciate their wiki and bridged chat channels.

Lately I’ve noticed a big spillover into the wiki space primarily by way of Tom Critchlow, Kicks Condor, some from TiddlyWiki and the Roam Research spaces, and many of your colleagues at egghead.io. I’m personally looking forward to the convergence of the website, blog, personal wiki, commonplace book, etc. in a single platform. 

As I notice that you’re in Brighton, if you haven’t been before, you might consider joining in one of the local Homebrew Website clubs either there, in other parts of the UK, or across the world. I see events for Nottingham and London coming up on the schedule, but I’m sure Jeremy Keith or other organizers will do another in Brighton soon.

In any case, you’re on the web, and we can “see” and “hear” you. Thanks for drawing up a campfire to create a discussion.

Replied to Perhaps, a little more than I can chew? by Steve EllwoodSteve Ellwood (Is This Future Shock?)
Having sorted out my office, and fixed one of my broken NAS, I decided to to look at my website. Moved it to a new theme, and started enabling it for IndieWeb yesterday. Wow. Bit of a hill for an old retired guy! Still, got some mentions working, started working on some syndications stuff, checked I...
Welcome to the independent web! 

Having been doing it for many years now, my advice would be to start slow and take it one thing at time. Slow and steady will definitely help out a lot. 

There’s also a lot out there that you can do, so tinker around a bit, read a bit, and ask yourself: what do I want my site to be able to do? Look at others’ sites: what do you like about them enough to want to build on your own site?

Maybe join us for an upcoming event too? 

Replied to a tweet by Carolina GilabertCarolina Gilabert (Twitter)

I’m enamored of Aaron Parecki‘s Monocle reader. I can subscribe to almost anything I want, read it without interfering algorithms, and reply to posts directly in the reader, which uses Micropub to post those directly on my site, which has Webmentions to send notifications to those sites in turn.

I’m similarly in love with an app version called Indigenous for Android.

But really, who can have just one favorite?!? I also love: 

They’ve not only got interesting sites, but they’re always doing cool things that are worth following.

And if you want some other interesting ones to take a peek at, I have longer list (with RSS/OPML) at https://boffosocko.com/about/following/

Replied to Webmentions by Daniel Pietzsch (danielpietzsch.com)
This site can now receive Webmentions. Either directly or via Twitter (with Bridgy’s help). Webmentions are a standard and open way to send and receive common social-media reactions like “comments”, “likes” or “replies” via and on any site. For this site here, I’m using Aaron Parecki...
Welcome to the party!
Replied to Re-invigorating my blog. by Matthew BogartMatthew Bogart (matthewbogart.net)
I’m not much of a blogger but I’ve always wanted to be. The value of keeping a blog for reasons beyond just sharing links to my work has been obvious to me for a while now. Watching folks like Austin Kleon, Andy Baio, John Gruber, Mark Evanier and others post week in and week out, I’ve yearned...
Congratulations Matthew!

If no one has invited you yet, the IndieWeb Summit is coming up in June in your backyard. There’s also an upcoming online camp in early February.