🎧 “Malcolm Gladwell’s 12 Rules for Life” Season 3 Episode 7 | Revisionist History

Listened “Malcolm Gladwell's 12 Rules for Life” Season 3 Episode 7 by Malcolm Gladwell from Revisionist History

"Crucial life lessons from the end of hockey games, Idris Elba, and some Wall Street guys with a lot of time on their hands."

Revisionist History wades into the crowded self-help marketplace, with some help with from a band of math whizzes and Hollywood screenwriters. It's late in a hockey game, and you're losing. When should you pull your goalie? And what if you used that same logic when a bad guy breaks into your house and holds your entire family hostage? We think the unthinkable, so you don’t have to.

Why one should be a bit more disagreeable and “pull the goalie”.

Pulling the Goalie: Hockey and Investment Implications on SSRN.

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🎧 “The Hug Heard Round the World” Season 3 Episode 6 | Revisionist History

Listened “The Hug Heard Round the World” Season 3 Episode 6 by Malcolm Gladwell from Revisionist History

"Q: Was there a period where you felt you had something to prove? A: The first 45 years of my life."

Sammy Davis Junior was one of the world’s greatest entertainers for the better part of half a century. He was black. But he thought the best way to succeed in the world was to act as if he wasn’t. Did we judge him too harshly?

I’m always astounded by some of the finer points that Gladwell comes up with. Taking a look back at this bit of history has a wonderfully enlightening idea. I was near tears at the end of the Roast segment.

I can also certainly relate to the idea of changing myself so as not to be an “outsider”.

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🎧 “General Chapman's Last Stand” Season 3 Episode 5 | Revisionist History

Listened “General Chapman's Last Stand” Season 3 Episode 5 by Malcolm Gladwell from Revisionist History

"Good fences make good neighbors. Or maybe not."

General Leonard Chapman guided the Marines Corp through some of the most difficult years in its history. He was brilliant, organized, decisive and indefatigable. Then he turned his attention to the America’s immigration crisis. You think you want effective leadership? Be careful what you wish for.

A piece of history I was surprised to not have heard about with relation to current immigration policy. Also a great example of how policy makers need to be able to think 20 steps into the potential futures to realize the ramifications of what they’re doing an the effects it will have on future generations.

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🎧 Should We Break Up Amazon? | Crazy/Genius | The Atlantic

Listened Should We Break Up Amazon? from Crazy/Genius | The Atlantic

Has the Everything Store become a dangerous monopoly threatening the U.S. economy?

Some time later this year, Amazon could become the first trillion-dollar company in American history. Its valuation has already doubled in the last 14 months to about $800 billion, and Jeff Bezos, its founder and CEO, is officially the richest man on the planet.

There are ways in which Amazon seems to be the greatest company in American history. It’s revolutionized the global shopping experience and expanded into media and hardware, while operating on razor-thin margins that have astonished critics. But some now consider it the modern incarnation of a railroad monopoly, a logistics behemoth using its scale to destroy competition.

So what is Amazon: brilliant, dangerous, or both? That’s the subject of the latest episode of Crazy/Genius, our new podcast on technology and culture.

To build the case for breaking up the Everything Store, I talk to Scott Galloway, a professor of marketing at NYU and an outspoken critic of big tech, and Lina Khan, a researcher at the Open Markets Institute and a leading expert on antitrust policy. Both of them encourage me to see how a company famous for low prices can still behave in an anticompetitive manner. Making the case against heavy regulation for Amazon are Rob Atkinson, the president of the Information Technology and Innovation Foundation, a tech think tank, and Michael Mandel, an economist with the Progressive Policy Institute who researches technology and e-commerce. Both encourage me to focus not only on the hidden costs of Amazon’s largeness, but also on the hidden benefits.

hat tip: Atlantic Interview podcast feed

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🎧 “Caliphate,” Chapter 10: One Year Later | New York Times

Listened “Caliphate,” Chapter 10: One Year Later by Rukmini Callimachi, Andy Mills from New York Times

What does the future hold for the ISIS returnee who confessed to murder? And what does he believe now?

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🎧 “Caliphate,” Chapter 9: Prisoners, Part Two | New York Times

Listened “Caliphate,” Chapter 9: Prisoners, Part Two by Rukmini Callimachi, Andy Mills from New York Times

After three years in ISIS captivity, a young Yazidi girl returns to her family. Rukmini is there to witness it.

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🎧 “Caliphate,” Chapter 9: Prisoners, Part One | New York Times

Listened “Caliphate,” Chapter 9: Prisoners, Part One by Rukmini Callimachi, Andy Mills from New York Times

Slavery was enmeshed in the theology of ISIS. Rukmini speaks to an ISIS detainee who challenges her to find the girl he enslaved. She does.

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🎧 “Caliphate,” Chapter 8: The Briefcase | New York Times

Listened “Caliphate,” Chapter 8: The Briefcase by Rukmini Callimachi, Andy Mills from New York Times

We found a trove of secret documents after Mosul fell. It led us to the mother of an ISIS official.

I love how this story really humanizes what is going on here compared with the soundbite snippets we hear from the US President at the moment. Things are far more complex and human, than they would seem. And what a fantastic little story this particular episode makes on so many levels. Mothers/sons, wealth/poverty, religion/bureaucracy, journalism/mystery and so much more.

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🎧 “Caliphate,” Chapter 6: Paper Trail | New York Times

Listened “Caliphate,” Chapter 6: Paper Trail by Rukmini Callimachi, Andy Mills from New York Times

“Something was off.” Rukmini’s doubt fuels a quest to uncover the truth.

Relistening to recall where we were in the story last so I can finish out the series.

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🎧 George Lakoff on How Trump uses words to con the public | Reliable Sources podcast

Listened George Lakoff on how Trump uses words to con the public by Brian Stelter from Reliable Sources | CNN

President Donald Trump has "turned words into weapons" -- and journalists are providing additional ammunition.

That's according to Trump critic George Lakoff, a renowned linguist and professor emeritus at the University of California at Berkeley. Lakoff wrote in a recent article for the Guardian that the president manipulates language to control the public narrative. The press, he said, functions as a sort of "marketing agency for [Trump's] ideas" by repeating his claims, even when trying to fact-check or debunk his statements.

"By faithfully transmitting Trump's words and ideas, the press helps him to attack, and thereby control, the press itself," he writes.

As the guest on this week's Reliable Sources podcast, Lakoff spoke to Brian Stelter about Trump's linguistic frames, what the press should do differently, and why journalists need to tackle Trump's words like a "truth sandwich."

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🎧 The Pack Horse Librarians Of Eastern Kentucky | NPR

Listened The Pack Horse Librarians Of Eastern Kentucky from NPR | Morning Edition

In 1930s Kentucky, in coal country, books made their way to remote and isolated regions of the state through The Pack Horse Library Project.

I just heard this story on NPR this morning and though “Modern Little Free Librarians have it so easy…”

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🎧 This Week in the IndieWeb Audio Edition • September 1st – 7th, 2018

Listened This Week in the IndieWeb Audio Edition • September 1st - 7th, 2018 by Marty McGuireMarty McGuire from martymcgui.re
XOXO Fest happened, fighting in the Fediverse, and new microsub clients bloom. It’s the audio edition for This Week in the IndieWeb for September 1st - 7th, 2018.

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🎧 This Week in the IndieWeb Audio Edition • August 18th – 24th, 2018

Listened This Week in the IndieWeb Audio Edition • August 18th - 24th, 2018 by Marty McGuireMarty McGuire from martymcgui.re
Barriers to diversity, a centralization of our own, and is federated overrated? It’s the audio edition for This Week in the IndieWeb for August 18th - 24th, 2018.

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🎧 This Week in the IndieWeb Audio Edition • August 25th – 31st, 2018

Listened This Week in the IndieWeb Audio Edition • August 25th - 31st, 2018 by Marty McGuireMarty McGuire from martymcgui.re
Facebook’s tweet blips, a post-web era, and oops wow this episode is late! It’s the audio edition for This Week in the IndieWeb for August 25th - 31st, 2018.

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🎧 This Week in Google 471 Twitch Slap | TWiT.TV

Listened This Week in Google 471 Twitch Slap by Leo Laporte, Jeff Jarvis, Stacey Higginbotham from TWiT.tv
Trump vs Google, Au Revoir G+
  • Trump says Google is unfair, warns that tech companies "better be careful"
  • FCC can legally redefine competitive broadband markets to include services you can't actually get
  • Google France Surrenders its Google+ Page
  • Want to Buy a Black Market Ukranian Pixel 3 XL?
  • Fortnite Creator Angry that Google Blabbed About Security Flaw
  • IGTV Struggles to Grow
  • CHANGELOG: Doodle 4 Google winner, helping vets find jobs, Google Go can read text out loud, Mini stickers for Gboard
Picks of the Week
  • Stacey's Thing: Smart Olive Bottle
  • Leo's Tool: Dumb Squeeze Bottles
  • Jeff's Number: LTE for Pixelbook 2

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