👓 Stonehenge builders used Pythagoras' theorem 2,000 years before Greek philosopher was born, say experts | The Telegraph

Read Stonehenge builders used Pythagoras' theorem 2,000 years before Greek philosopher was born, say experts  by Sarah Knapton (The Telegraph)
The builders of Britain’s ancient stone circles like Stonehenge were using Pythagoras' theorem 2,000 years before the Greek philosopher was born, experts have claimed.

I’ll be bookmarking the book described in this piece for later. The author doesn’t get into the specifics of the claim in the title enough for my taste. What is the actual evidence? Is there some other geometrical construct they’re using to come up with these figures that doesn’t involve Pythagoras?

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Following My Favorite Theorem by Kevin Knudson and Evelyn Lamb

Followed My Favorite Theorem by Kevin Knudson and Evelyn Lamb (kpknudson.com)
University of Florida mathematician Kevin Knudson and I are excited to announce our new math podcast: My Favorite Theorem. In each episode, logically enough, we invite a mathematician on to tell us about their favorite theorem. Because the best things in life are better together, we also ask our guests to pair their theorem with, well, anything: wine, beer, coffee, tea, ice cream flavors, cheese, favorite pieces of music, you name it. We hope you’ll enjoy learning the perfect pairings for some beautiful pieces of math. We’re very excited about the podcast and hope you will listen here, on the site’s page, or wherever you get your podcasts. New episodes will be published approximately every three weeks. We have a great lineup of guests so far and think you’ll enjoy hearing from mathematicians from different mathematical areas, geographic locations, and mathematical careers.

👓 LaTeXiT | chachatelier.fr

Bookmarked LaTeXiT (chachatelier.fr)
Should LaTeXiT be categorized, it would be an equation editor. This is not the plain truth, since LaTeXiT is "simply" a graphical interface above a LaTeX engine. However, its large set of features is a reason to see it as an editor; this is the goal in fact.
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👓 Andrew Jordan reviews Peter Woit’s Quantum Theory, Groups and Representations and finds much to admire. | Inference

Read Woit’s Way by Andrew Jordan (Inference: International Review of Science)
Andrew Jordan reviews Peter Woit's Quantum Theory, Groups and Representations and finds much to admire.

For the tourists, I’ve noted before that Peter maintains a free copy of his new textbook on his website.

I also don’t think I’ve ever come across the journal Inference before, but it looks quite nice in terms of content and editorial.

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👓 Where Boys Outperform Girls in Math: Rich, White and Suburban Districts | New York Times

Read Where Boys Outperform Girls in Math: Rich, White and Suburban Districts by Claire Cain Miller (nytimes.com)
A study of 10,000 school districts shows how local norms help grow or shrink gender achievement gaps.
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👓 Francis Su’s Favorite Theorem | Scientific American Blog Network | Roots of Unity

Read Francis Su's Favorite Theorem by Evelyn Lamb (Scientific American Blog Network | Roots of Unity)
The Harvey Mudd College mathematician tells us why he loves playing with Brouwer's fixed-point theorem

I need to remember to subscribe to this podcast…

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👓 Just teach my kid the <adjective> math | Medium

Read Just teach my kid the <adjective> math by James Tanton (Q.E.D. – Medium)
It is astounding to me that mathematics — of all school subjects — elicits such potent emotional reaction when “reform” is in the air…

An interesting take on the changes in math curriculum over the past few years. Takeaway, we need to think about the pedagogy we use with the public and parents as well.

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👓 Squares and prettier graphs | Stuart Landridge

Read Squares and prettier graphs by Stuart Landridge (kryogenix.org)
The Futility Closet people recently posted “A Square Circle“, in which they showed: 49² + 73² = 7730 77² + 30² = 6829 68² + 29² = 5465 54² + 65² = 7141 71² + 41² = 6722 67² + 22² = 4973 which is a nice little result. I like this sort of recreational maths, so I spent a little time w...

An interesting cyclic structure here.

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🔖 Bulletin of Mathematical Biology, Volume 80, Issue 5 Special Issue: Mathematical Oncology

Bookmarked Bulletin of Mathematical Biology, Volume 80, Issue 5 (Springer)
Special Issue: Mathematical Oncology

h/t to @ara_anderson

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🔖 The Theory of Quantum Information by John Watrous

Bookmarked The Theory of Quantum Information by Tom Watrous (cs.uwaterloo.ca)

To be published by Cambridge University Press in April 2018.

Upon publication this book will be available for purchase through Cambridge University Press and other standard distribution channels. Please see the publisher's web page to pre-order the book or to obtain further details on its publication date.

A draft, pre-publication copy of the book can be found below. This draft copy is made available for personal use only and must not be sold or redistributed.

This largely self-contained book on the theory of quantum information focuses on precise mathematical formulations and proofs of fundamental facts that form the foundation of the subject. It is intended for graduate students and researchers in mathematics, computer science, and theoretical physics seeking to develop a thorough understanding of key results, proof techniques, and methodologies that are relevant to a wide range of research topics within the theory of quantum information and computation. The book is accessible to readers with an understanding of basic mathematics, including linear algebra, mathematical analysis, and probability theory. An introductory chapter summarizes these necessary mathematical prerequisites, and starting from this foundation, the book includes clear and complete proofs of all results it presents. Each subsequent chapter includes challenging exercises intended to help readers to develop their own skills for discovering proofs concerning the theory of quantum information.

h/t to @michael_nielsen via Nuzzel

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🔖 actualham tweet about interactive glossary/encyclopedia for challenging technical/academic jargon that can be layered into textbooks

Bookmarked a tweet by Robin DeRosa on TwitterRobin DeRosa on Twitter (Twitter)

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Following Ilyas Khan

Followed Ilyas Khan (LinkedIn)
Ilyas Khan Co-Founder and CEO at Cambridge Quantum Computing

Dear god, I wish Ilyas had a traditional blog with a true feed, but I’m willing to put up with the inconvenience of manually looking him up from time to time to see what he’s writing about quantum mechanics, quantum computing, category theory, and other areas of math.

Reply to A (very) gentle comment on Algebraic Geometry for the faint-hearted | Ilyas Khan

Replied to A (very) gentle comment on Algebraic Geometry for the faint-hearted by Ilyas KhanIlyas Khan (LinkedIn)
This short article is the result of various conversations over the course of the past year or so that arose on the back of two articles/blog pieces that I have previously written about Category Theory (here and here). One of my objectives with such articles, whether they be on aspects of quantum computing or about aspects of maths, is to try and de-mystify as much of the associated jargon as possible, and bring some of the stunning beauty and wonder of the subject to as wide an audience as possible. Whilst it is clearly not possible to become an expert overnight, and it is certainly not my objective to try and provide more than an introduction (hopefully stimulating further research and study), I remain convinced that with a little effort, non-specialists and even self confessed math-phobes can grasp some of the core concepts. In the case of my articles on Category Theory, I felt that even if I could generate one small gasp of excited comprehension where there was previously only confusion, then the articles were worth writing.

I just finished a course on Algebraic Geometry through UCLA Extension, which was geared toward non-traditional math students and professionals, and wish I had known about Smith’s textbook when I’d started. I did spend some time with Cox, Little, and O’Shea’s Ideals, Varieties, and Algorithms which is a pretty good introduction to the area, but written a bit more for computer scientists and engineers in mind rather than the pure mathematician, which might recommend it more toward your audience here as well. It’s certainly more accessible than Hartshorne for the faint-of-heart.

I’ve enjoyed your prior articles on category theory which have spurred me to delve deeper into the area. For others who are interested, I thought I’d also mention that physicist and information theorist John Carlos Baez at UCR has recently started an applied category theory online course which I suspect is a bit more accessible than most of the higher graduate level texts and courses currently out. For more details, I’d suggest starting here: https://johncarlosbaez.wordpress.com/2018/03/26/seven-sketches-in-compositionality/

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👓 Decades-Old Graph Problem Yields to Amateur Mathematician | Quanta Magazine

Read Decades-Old Graph Problem Yields to Amateur Mathematician (Quanta Magazine)
By making the first progress on the “chromatic number of the plane” problem in over 60 years, an anti-aging pundit has achieved mathematical immortality.
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🔖 List of geometry topics

Bookmarked List of geometry topics (Wikiwand)
This is a list of geometry topics, by Wikipedia page.

h/t to @mathematicsprof

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