RSVPed Attending WordPress IndieWeb Online Meetup

Interested in the Indieweb, but you already have a WordPress site? Do you have a WordPress website or thinking of starting one?

Whether you’re a blogger, coder, designer, or just someone who wants to improve their presence on the web, if you have a WordPress site and want to add Indieweb functionality to it, this is the meetup for you.

Expand your reach, improve your connection with your audience. Make it easier to interact with your website. Have better control of your web presence.

With recent events keeping many of us at home, what better time is there to connect your presence on the web to others?

  • 7:00-7:15 - Introductions
  • 7:15-7:45 - overview of Indieweb tools and WordPress
  • 7:45-9:00 - Open Discussion/Chat/Support
Read IndieWeb and Webmentions by Chris Coyier (CSS-Tricks)
The IndieWeb is a thing! They've got a conference coming up and everything. The New Yorker is even writing about it:

Om Malik writes about a renewed focus on his own blog:
“My first decree was to eschew any and all analytics. I don’t want to be driven by “views,” or what Google deems worthy of rank. I write what pleases me, not some algorithm. Walking away from quantification of my creativity was an act of taking back control. 

I love this quote.
Annotated on March 30, 2020 at 10:49AM

What I dwell on the most regarding syndication is the Twitter stuff. I look back at the analytics on this site at the end of every year and look at where the traffic came from — every year, Twitter is a teeny-weeny itty-bitty slice of the pie. Measuring traffic alone, that’s nowhere near the amount of effort we put into making the stuff we’re tweeting there. I always rationalize it to myself in other ways. I feel like Twitter is one of the major ways I stay updated with the industry and it’s a major source of ideas for articles. 

So it sounds like Twitter isn’t driving traffic to his website, but it is providing ideas and news.

Given this I would syndicate content to Twitter as easily and quickly as possible, use webmentions to deal with the interactions and then just use the Twitter timeline for reading and consuming and nothing else.

Annotated on March 30, 2020 at 10:51AM

Read Zoom is bad and you should feel bad (jwz.org)
This is the only video phone I have time for. I don't want to talk to you people, let alone see you. FFS. Apparently all of you are diving headlong into the nightmare that is video conferencing, and "Zoom" seems to be the poison of choice these days, so you should know that it's terrible: Violet Blu...
Read Create Zettel from Reading Notes According to the Principle of Atomicity (Zettelkasten Method)
I separate collecting from processing because I don’t hack everything that pops up in my mind while I read a text into my computer. Instead, I take notes on paper.

Creativity is just connecting things. When you ask creative people how they did something, they feel a little guilty because they didn’t really do it, they just saw something. It seemed obvious to them after a while.
—Steve Jobs (via lifehacker and Zettel no. 201308301352) 

in other words, it’s just statistical thermodynamics. Eventually small pieces will float by each other and stick together in new and hopefully interesting ways. The more particles you’ve got and the more you can potentially connect or link things, the better off you’ll be.
Annotated on March 23, 2020 at 04:36PM

Reposted a tweet by  Stephen Downes (@oldaily) Stephen Downes (@oldaily) (Twitter)
Thanks for the shout out (and the Webmention) Stephen!
I have a few subscriptions to bulk products on Amazon that ship every 2-6 months or so and yesterday was the drop date for my 3 pack of Clorox Disinfecting Wipes. My dog food in the same order should arrive on Tuesday, but the wipes aren’t estimated to arrive until April 27-29. Apparently the coronavirus scare has too many people stockpiling. Ugh.
RSVPed Attending ONLINE: Homebrew Website Club West Coast
April 1, 2020
Wed 6:00 - 8:00pm (America/Los_Angeles)
 

Join the Zoom call: link to come

We will provide a Zoom video conference link 20 minutes before the meetup here and in the IndieWeb chat.


Homebrew Website Club is a meetup for anyone interested in personal websites and a distributed web. Whether you’re a blogger, coder, designer, or just someone who wants to improve their presence on the web, this meetup is for you.

6:00pm–7:00pm Quiet writing hour

  • Finish that blog post you’ve been working on!

7:00pm–8:00pm IndieWeb Meetup

  • Demos of personal website breakthroughs
  • Discussion around the independent web
  • Create or update your personal web site!

Join a community with like-minded interests. Bring friends that want a personal site, or are interested in a healthy, independent web!

Chat archives

Please read through our Code of Conduct.

Watched Lecture 4 of 24: Augustine's Pagan and Christian Audience by Charles Mathewes from The City of God (Books That Matter) | The Great Courses
Before delving into the text of The City of God, Professor Mathewes sets the stage with some context about the many audiences that Augustine was writing for, as well as the arguments against Christians that he was confronting. See how Augustine co-opted Roman notions of city" and "glory" and applied them to his divine purpose."
A fascinating lecture about the word City of the title and the first word of the book with a tad about the rest of the first sentence!
Watched Lecture 3 of 24: The Sack of Rome, 410 A.D. by Charles Mathewes from The City of God (Books That Matter) | The Great Courses
While Roman elites viewed the sack of Rome as a turning point that changed the world forever, the event itself lasted only three days and served more as a catalyst for change than a cataclysm in its own right. In this lecture, you'll find out why the sack was so monumental, and how it inspired Augustine to write The City of God.
Sack of Rome as a context for the book.

Watched Lecture 18: Arguing with Paul? by Dale B. Martin from RLST 152: Introduction to the New Testament History and Literature

Early Christianity presents us with a wide diversity in attitudes towards the law. There were also many different Christologies circulating in different communities. The book of James presents one unique perspective. It seems to be written in the tradition of Jewish wisdom literature in its presentation of sayings and its concern for the poor. James also presents a view of works and faith that seems to oppose Pauline teaching. However, the terms "faith" and "works" function differently in Paul's writings and in the book of James

  • 00:00 - Chapter 1. Diversity in Early Christianity: Attitudes towards the Jewish Law
  • 03:57 - Chapter 2. Diversity in Early Christianity: Christology
  • 21:03 - Chapter 3. James as Jewish Wisdom Literature
  • 27:47 - Chapter 4. Faith and Works in James in Comparison to Paul

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses

Interesting to think about how much of our culture is built on the writings of the rich and privileged and the compounding effect it has had over the millennia. 
Watched Lecture 17: Paul's Disciples by Dale B. Martin from RLST 152: Introduction to the New Testament History and Literature
Introduction to New Testament (RLST 152) In ancient times, documents that were falsely attributed to an author, called pseudepigrapha, were a common phenomen...

In ancient times, documents that were falsely attributed to an author, called pseudepigrapha, were a common phenomenon. Both the Letters to the Colossians and Ephesians are most likely pseudonymous works attributed to the Apostle Paul. The writer of Colossians assures his readers that they already possess all the benefits of salvation and do not need to observe rules concerning feast days, Sabbaths, and worship of the angels. Ephesians seems somewhat based on Colossians, although it reads more like an ethical or moral treatise. Both letters differ from Pauline Christology in their realized eschatology and high Christology.

  • 00:00 - Chapter 1. Ancient Pseudepigraphy
  • 10:42 - Chapter 2. The Pseudepigraphic Letters to the Colossians and Ephesians
  • 22:21 - Chapter 3. The Occasion of the Writing of Colossians
  • 37:15 - Chapter 4. The Letter to the Ephesians as Treatise
  • 42:26 - Chapter 5. Major Differences between Colossians and Ephesians and Pauline Christianity

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses

Also as I’m looking at the evolution of the early Christian church, many of the changes from the teachings of Jesus and the re-framing by Paul and then other subsequent writers and church elders seemed to work to re-entrench the patriarchy and give power back to the wealthy and powerful. Jesus and Paul seemed to have a much more egalitarian outlook which was walked by by later writings. 

This may be harder to “prove” to present-day Christians because most don’t view the bible from a historical perspective. Too many modern Christians seem to take too much of Colossians and Ephesians to heart in terms of gender roles. I might suggest that much of the gender toxicity that we’ve seen in Western history may be attributed to these two pseudepigraphical books.

Watched The Reason Paul Schneider Left Parks And Rec After Season 2 from YouTube

The Reason Paul Schneider Left Parks And Rec After Season 2
We all remember Parks and Recreation season 2: Leslie was trying to fix the pit. Andy and April began their triumphant weirdo love story. Chris Traeger and Ben Wyatt joined the merry band of civil servants. But do you remember Mark Brendanawicz?

Paul Schneider played Mark, the Pawnee, Indiana city planner who was a relatively central character on Parks and Recreation's first season and who had a scrapped romance subplot with Amy Poehler's Leslie Knope. In the second season, Mark's purpose began to flounder despite a second, and ultimately crumbled, romance with Rashida Jones' Ann Perkins. During the Parks and Rec season 2 finale, Mark announced he was leaving city government for a job with a private-sector construction company...

...which earned him a new nickname from Leslie, "Mark Brendanaquits”, and he was never heard from again. Chris and Ben's entrance into Parks and Recreation as guest characters on season 2 proved to be the perfect gift in disguise to slip Mark's departure past everyone with few questions asked.

Looking back, there are some mysteries left unsolved. Why have Mark leave at all, and why did Paul Schneider exit Parks and Recreation and never return?

In short, Paul Schneider left Parks and Recreation because he felt sidelined. Several years after the fact, the actor opened up about his Parks departure in an interview with Screen Crush, revealing that he felt he'd been at a creative crossroads with the series' writers after Mark's character was altered from the first season. The early episodes of Parks and Rec are rougher and feature more tension and disdain between the characters, just like its predecessor, The Office. Mark Brendanawicz's character is a relic of that previous style, and he was reportedly an even less likable character in earlier versions of Parks and Recreation. A shift in emotional perspective came about as the series continued on, and while it worked out well for many principal characters, it didn't for Mark. Keep watching the video to see the reason Paul Schneider left Parks and Rec after season 2.

I vaguely remember him from the beginning, but mostly I remember Leslie continually badmouthing Mark Brendanawicz in later seasons. It seemed relatively obvious to me that he would leave given his minimal interaction on the show from the beginning of the series to the end of the first season. These sorts of situations are never fun for the agents/managers, particularly if the writing staff and producers aren’t sure what they’re doing or where the show is going.