Replied to a post by Xandra (biglizardbooks.net)
Articles on Quill don’t seem to have the ability to syndicate to twitter and mastodo, so I might end up using micropublish. Bit frustrating to figure this all out, but also kind of fun to be honest.
If you use the Syndication Links plugin and configure it, Quill should be able to find your Twitter and Mastodon “endpoints” on your site and provide you with buttons to syndicate to them. 

It looks like your theme has an extra u-photo on it that’s causing that avatar image to be sent to Twitter by the way. The way the microformats are set up is also causing them (Syndication Links) to display too, but it’s fixable with some tinkering. You might try IndieWeb chat to see if someone can help you troubleshoot it.

Replied to a tweet by James Van Dyne (Twitter)
I do that! Try Micropub plugin + Syndication Links plugin + Quill or any of the other micropub clients that support posting notes and syndication endpoints.

Reach out if you need help to get it set up.

If you want to go crazy and thread your Twitter conversations, that’s possible too…

I’m planning on setting up up a regularly recurring Domain of One’s Own focused online meetup in the mold of Homebrew Website Clubs or WordPress meetups. People can ask questions, get help, collaborate, demo technology and ways they’re using their domains.

I’m thinking monthly to start, but I’m curious what days of the week and times might work best for people, especially across time zones?

Let me know if you’re interested in helping to organize or would like to join us to participate.

Featured image: Hard Drive Repair flickr photo by wwarby shared under a Creative Commons (BY) license

Thanks, as ever, to the inimitable Alex Vasquez for hosting the WordPress Pasadena General Meetup last night. It’s always good to see everyone!

I’m most excited to learn about the upcoming WordCamp Los Angeles Online. Can’t wait to see what the speaker line up will look like. Are you going to submit a talk?

Replied to Hovercards by Joseph DicksonJoseph Dickson (linuxbookpro.com)
A Hovercard also known as a h-card is a bit of content that’s shared about you on your website kinda like a visual/interactive business card. Implementation looks like Gravitar. It can contain far more information and is self-hosted.
Joseph, I thought I caught you say it during the demos, but wasn’t 100% sure. Reading this, confirms it. You’re conflating two different but very similar ideas.

h-card is a microformat class around the mark up of data about identity elements like names, addresses, cities, countries, and often including an avatar or photo. Hovercard is a UI element that creates a visual card when one hovers over a name or similar element that would contain h-card details. 

Gravatar serves some of these functions for WordPress from a centralized perspective. The data you would imput there would be wrapped with the h-card class, while Jetpack would give you the ability to display Gravatars as hovercards, so that when you hover over an avatar it will display more detail about the person in a small card-like UI.

For your experimentation purposes, you should be able to use just one post to test against my site. Once you’ve modified your theme, you can simply resend the webmention to my site and that will automatically update your original post. You don’t need to create new posts each time to test it out.

If you haven’t gotten it cleared up, do join us in the IndieWeb channel, or catch us at an upcoming HWC event.

 

Read IndieFollow by Matthias PfefferleMatthias Pfefferle (notizBlog)
Letzte Woche war WordCamp Europe. Mit weit über 8000 Teilnehmern war es das bisher größte online WordCamp! Bei der Größe ist es klar, dass man auch eine ganze Menge neuer und interessanter Leute trifft. Also schnell auf Twitter und allen folgen! Ich war auf dem größten online Event, von dem w...
I’ve commented before that I really don’t understand why WordCamps don’t provide badges with spaces for one’s website as their primary identity. Twitter can be good for quick follows and conference chatter, but now that we have some tools for doing a lot of this within WordPress, why not use it and prefer it over other methods?

Matthias has some great thoughts here about following and highlights a great follow page he’s built for his own website.

Thanks @joesimpsonjr and @wordpressscv for a great meetup today on Custom Post Types and Taxonomies with Marco Berrocal

WordPress Custom Post Types and Taxonomies with Marco Berrocal

Saturday, Jun 20, 2020, 11:00 AM

Online event
,

23 WordPress Enthusiasts Went

OVERVIEW: There are times when a WordPress installation may come up short in relation to what is required by your client. You need content of another type that isn’t a page or a post, and you need to label it differently. Enter Custom Post Types and Taxonomies. During this Meetup, Marco will discuss what they are, show you how to create them, what …

Check out this Meetup →

Replied to a post by Amit GawandeAmit Gawande (amitgawande.com)
The only way for you to Indiewebify your WordPress blog is to subscribe to a business plan? That can’t be right because that plan’s not cheap.
You could always do managed hosting from any number of WordPress hosts. The ~$5/month should be easier and much less expensive than WordPress.com business packages. 

@nitinkhanna, “True” IndieWeb is really just owning your domain name/URL and being able to download or export one’s content. All the other IndieWeb building blocks are just gravy if you want/need them.

Read a post by Bix Bix (bix.blog)
Webmentions are strange, at least in how the WordPress plugin handles them, as they contain far less context about the pinging post — which is to say none whatsoever. Old-fashioned trackbacks and pingbacks at least include a snippet of the post which sent the ping. Webmentions are presented simply with, “This post was mentioned by whomever.” This does not seem especially helpful when such inter-blog links are meant to serve not just conversation but context on the web.
Read a post by Bix Bix (bix.blog)
“If your software fails you,” writes Evgeny Kuznetsov, “it’s not always an indication that something is wrong with the protocol.” Which might be why my webmentions post this replies to begins, “Webmentions are strange, at least in how the WordPress plugin handles them.” Although, upon doing some reading, it’s my understanding that trackback does send a post excerpt, etc., although it’s optional; only pingback and webmention send just the URL.

Thread Reader and Micropub for PressEdConf

In March I wrote about Participating in PressEdConf20 directly from WordPress.

While using that method for publishing is still my preference for owning the content first and syndicating it to Twitter, there’s another method that many educators might find simpler. ThreadReaderApp now has beta support for the Micropub Spec so you can publish Twitter threads directly to your blog.

This means that participants can write their threads directly on Twitter and reverse syndicate them to their websites if they support the Micropub spec.

For PressEdConf participants who have WordPress.org based sites (or .com sites with a subscription that supports plugins), this should be relatively easy since there’s a Micropub plugin for WordPress.

Download the plugin, activate it, write your Twitter thread, and have Thread Reader unroll it. Then authentic Thread Reader to your website at https://threadreaderapp.com/account/micropub and click the publish button on the thread you want to copy to your site.

This functionality in Thread Reader will also work for any other blogging platform or CMS that has either native or plugin support for Micropub. This includes platforms like Drupal, Grav, WithKnown, and many others including several static site generators.

Once things are set up, it’s pretty straightforward. You can read about my first experience (linked above) for more details.

If you have prior unrolled Twitter threads in your Thread Reader account you can use them as test cases before the next PressEdConf.

 

 

RSVPed Attending WordPress Custom Post Types and Taxonomies with Marco Berrocal
Sat, Jun 20, 2020, 11:00 AM
OVERVIEW: There are times when a WordPress installation may come up short in relation to what is required by your client. You need content of another type that isn’t a page or a post, and you need to label it differently. Enter Custom Post Types and Taxonomies.
During this Meetup, Marco will discuss what they are, show you how to create them, what his recommendations are when it comes to creating them, and how you can see WordPress as more than just a blogging or a simple site platform.