👓 WordPress 5.0 needs a different timeline | Joost.blog

Read WordPress 5.0 needs a different timeline by Joost de Valk (Joost.blog)
For the last few months, the WordPress developer community has been moving towards a release of WordPress 5.0. This is the highly anticipated release that will contain the new Gutenberg editing experience. It’s arguably one of the biggest leaps forward in WordPress’ editing experience and its de...
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👓 IndieWeb and the Log Lolla theme | More Themes Baby

Replied to IndieWeb and the Log Lolla theme (More Themes Baby)
Lately I found myself posting a lot about IndieWeb, and thinking about how useful it could be for the next versions of the Log Lolla theme.

I ran across this article today as the result of a refback of all things (hooray for old web infrastructure!). The site had reposted a few IndieWeb related articles I wrote in the past year.

Since they don’t support webmention and don’t seem to have comments on their site open, I’ll say “Hello!” by syndicating to Twitter. I hope you haven’t given up on the idea of what the IndieWeb stands for and are still thinking of making your Log Lolla theme directly compatible with how the IndieWeb works with WordPress. There are a bunch of us out here who’d love to give you any help and support you need as we’d all love to see more IndieWeb friendly themes in the WordPress repo. Feel free to join us in the #IndieWeb chat or the #WordPress chat to say hello.

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👓 Creating Custom RSS Feeds in WordPress – The Right Way | Philip Newcomer

Read Creating Custom RSS Feeds in WordPress - The Right Way by Philip Newcomer (Philip Newcomer)
There are a lot of tutorials floating around the internet that describe how to create a custom RSS feed in WordPress. Most of them have you creating a new page template, copying the code that WordPress uses to generate feeds into the page … Continue reading →

I’ve run into a lot of the sort of tutorials that Philip is talking about. This way, while more sophisticated and non-intuitive to the non-profession, seems much more solid. Makes me want to play around.

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👓 Zero-day in popular WordPress plugin exploited in the wild to take over sites | ZDNet

Read Zero-day in popular WordPress plugin exploited in the wild to take over sites by Catalin Cimpanu (ZDNet)
Attacks started around three weeks ago and are still going on. Users should update the WP GDPR Compliance plugin to version 1.4.3 to protect their sites.
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Reply to It’s time for a new branch of public media by Ben Werdmüller

Replied to It's time for a new branch of public media by Ben WerdmüllerBen Werdmüller (Ben Werdmüller)
President Lyndon B Johnson signed the Public Broadcasting Act in 1967, which established the Corporation for Public Broadcasting. Previously, an independent public broadcaster had been established through grants by the Ford Foundation, but Ford began to withdraw its support. Here's what he said: "It...

I’ve been thinking very similarly along these lines for six months or more, but with a particular slant at journalistic enterprises. I’ve specifically been considering what would happen if small local newspapers and other journalistic outlets were running IndieWeb-esque platforms for their local communities. This would potentially help to moderate and encourage local conversations and consumption of local grown content and journalism and potentially improve the toxicity of general social media or massive issues like those that Facebook is facing with genocidal effects of their platform in Myanmar where they didn’t have any local presence or moderation much less people in-house who had language capabilities to even begin to deal with these issues. This type of mission could better empower entities to improve both local journalism by binding it to a different substrate as a financial model  and fix many of the issues we see with social media simultaneously.

This general idea also isn’t too dissimilar from Greg McVerry’s idea of having local libraries allow patrons to “check out” (aka set up) their own domains and social presences/identities using their library cards.

The difficulty I see is that as the world moves toward increased specialization, that looking for newspapers or even municipalities to oversee and maintain such infrastructure may be difficult. I already see issues with smaller outlets building and maintaining their own publishing platforms with simple out-of-the-box CMS solutions that are relatively easy-to-use and modify with simple plugins. (In a recent inventory of my local news sources, I’ll note here that nearly 100% of the local online news sources for my community are running on WordPress, but not all of them have a huge amount of technical knowledge about what and how they’re doing it in those spaces). The growth of content management systems like Ghost, which has a journalistic bent, also indicates that there isn’t a “perfect solution” to the CMS problem, much less the issues of running IndieWeb-like platforms/clusters based on simpler platforms like WordPress or even Known. There’s certainly a lot of space out there for third party companies to help grow and expand in both of these areas (community-based social platforms as well as journalism platforms and admixtures thereof.)

If local institutions or even governments did move in this direction, then their users are at the potential mercy of third-party businesses which may not necessarily be aligned with local values.  An example of something akin to this was covered recently in The Daily on their episode Taking Over Local News. I’m also reminded about of my poor experiences  with un-moderated third party platforms like Nextdoor.com can be.

Another microcosm to look at is how hundreds of thousands of public libraries are interfacing with the four or more media suppliers of e-books and what that financial model looks like as, if taken, I would suspect a similar trajectory for local social public media. Similarly looking at how municipalities interface with cable franchising can reveal some pitfalls to avoid moving forward with respect to monopolies and competition.

Certainly some additional thought about how to solve these issues at the smaller local and personal levels is welcome. Thanks for dipping into and expanding my surface area of thinking Ben.

👓 Mapping Microformats To This Site | Interdependent Thoughts

Read Mapping Microformats To This Site by Ton ZijlstraTon Zijlstra (zylstra.org)

As a first step to better understand the different layers of adding microformats to my site (what is currently done by the theme, what by plugins etc.), I decided to start with: what is supposed to go where?

I made a post-it map on my wall to create an overview for myself. The map corresponds to the front page of my blog.

Green is content, pink is h- elements, blue u- elements, and yellow p- elements, with the little square ones covering dt- and rel’s. All this is based on the information provided on the http://microformats.org/wiki/Main_Page, and not on what my site actually does. So next step is a comparison of what I expect to be there from this map, to what is actually there. This map is also a useful step to see how to add microformats to the u-design theme for myself.

This is an interesting visual exercise.

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Reply to Ton Zijlstra about microformats in WordPress

Replied to Better Blending of Micro Formats with WordPress Themes by Ton Zijlstra (zylstra.org)
Earlier this week I discussed microformats with Elmine. Microformats make your website machine readable, allowing other computers and applications to e.g. find out where my contact information is, and the metadata from my postings. It was a discussion that branched off a conversation on online repre...

Ton, one of the best “crash courses” I’ve seen for working toward adding microformats to a pre-existing WordPress theme is David Shanske’s GitHub repo forking of the WordPress TwentySixteen Theme. If you follow the list of commits in chronological order from the oldest, you’ll get a good idea of what could and should be done and even how to do it.

Naturally, keep in mind that some themes may also have a few already implemented while others may have them implemented poorly (and sometimes even wrong).

Spent a few minutes late this afternoon to update the CSS on my website to hide the automatic titles given to annotation and highlight posts. Also modified these slightly to give the highlighted/quoted portion of other sites a highlighter-yellow color.

An example of the yellow highlight color of highlighted/annotated posts on my website. Previously the quoted portions had been a muted grey like other posts.

❤️ WordCampRS tweet: Group activity in Fun with Fonts with Jessica Broctor

Liked a tweet by WordCamp Riverside (Twitter)

I could have sworn I still had some dark hair on the crown of my head. Apparently not anymore…

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❤️ DawnHeuft tweet: Own your own content. Learning about IndieWeb.org at Chris Aldrich session.

Liked a tweet by Dawn HeuftDawn Heuft (Twitter)
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❤️ genoq tweet: Great reminder that social platforms come and go and so does the content you put on there

Liked a tweet by Geno QuirozGeno Quiroz (Twitter)
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❤️ WordCampRS tweet: Serious swag seekers at this morning’s WordCamp Riverside!

Liked a tweet by WordCamp Riverside (Twitter)
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Reply to Taylor Jadin about planet functionality for education

Replied to a tweet by Taylor JadinTaylor Jadin (Twitter)
It was a pretty productive Open Domains Lab for me. Got my sort "funnel" site set somewhat set up using FeedWordpress. http://taylor.jadin.me/

I’m curious to hear your thoughts after using it. It sounds like it has a lot of functionality overlap with Press Forward (for WordPress). Planet-like functionality is commonly requested in the education and technology space. Are there others? Stephen DownesgRSShopper perhaps?

 

 

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