Read Wix and Their Dirty Tricks by Matt Mullenweg (Matt Mullenweg)
Wix, the website builder company you may remember from stealing WordPress code and lying about it, has now decided the best way to gain relevance is attacking the open source WordPress community in a bizarre set of ads. They can’t even come up with original concepts for attack ads, and have tried ...
I’ve never been able to recommend people to use Wix simply for the export issue. This should have been one of their first features. Matt does a good job of indicating other reasons not to support them.

I was also a bit surprised to see him actively recommending other projects and platforms. 🙂

RSVPed Attending Advanced Custom Fields + Elementor
Online event
March 27, 2021 at 01:00PM - March 27, 2021 at 02:30PM

This month, we'll look at how Elementor quickly incorporates Advanced Custom Fields (ACF) to add dynamic content to your WordPress sites. Want more control over what your clients can change in your Elementor build?

During this meetup, we'll learn about a long-time WordPress staple, ACF basic features, and explore how Elementor was used as part of a current project solution.

We welcome your wins, stories, and solutions ACF for WordPress with Elementor.

We'll start the meeting with the latest Elementor news, announcements, and introductions. Time permitting, we'll answer questions or look at what you're working on.

RSVPed Attending Case Study: Using ACF to Customize the Client Experience
Online event
March 27, 2021 at 10:30AM - March 27, 2021 at 12:00PM

During this Meetup, we'll share a case study of a current project site build in a project that leveraged ACF. We'll look at the current site setup and its challenges and an approach to creating a 'lifeboat' WordPress to save a non-WordPress legacy site. We'd also love to hear your ACF stories and best practices.
Replied to A Throwback To the Past: Introducing the Blogroll Block WordPress Plugin by Justin Tadlock (WordPress Tavern)
It was 2003. I was just getting my first taste of blogging and similar experiments on the world wide web. Seemingly every blog I toured showcased a long list of the owner’s friends. These wer…
Michael Beckwith, this is genius. Long live blogrolls!

But let’s be honest, they’re a sort of discovery method that is also built into other social platforms: Twitter lists,Twitter follow lists, Facebook lists, etc. Most now have AI using these lists to suggest who you ought to follow next. When will WordPress get that plugin?

My issue is that in a bigger social space, we need full pages for these sorts of data rather than the small sidebar widgets of yore.

This was the last serious conversation I remember seeing about the old Link Manager:

So who besides Michael has a blogroll now? Mine’s at https://boffosocko.com/about/following/. Where’s yours?!

Replied to a tweet
I’ve PressED on about Webmention before, but all the credit for this talk goes to @jgmac1106. This is a good reminder to prep for this year’s though.
Liked a tweet (Twitter)
Can’t wait to try out Velox as an IndieWeb friendly theme!
Replied to Lets bring back the blogroll to WordPress by Michael Beckwith (Michaelbox)
Come with me as I briefly explore Blogrolls and re-introducing them in 2021 and creating a WordPress Block for their display.
I have so many ideas about this. The first one being that it’s awesome.

While WordPress is about websites, it’s also got a lot of pieces of social media sites hiding under the hood and blogrolls are generally precursors of the following/followed piece.

Blogrolls were traditionally stuck on a small widget, but I think they now deserve their own full pages. I’d love to have one with a list of all the people I follow (subscribe to) as well as a similar one with those who follow me (and this could be implemented with webmention receipts of others who have me on their blogroll). I’ve got versions/mock ups of these pages on my own site already as examples.

Next up is something to make these easier to use and import. I’d love a bookmarklet or a browser extension that I could use one click with to have the person’s page imported into my collection of links that parses the page (perhaps the h-card or meta data) and pulls all the data into the link database.

I always loved the fact that the original generated OPML files (even by category) so that I could dump the list of data from my own site into a feed reader and just go. Keeping this would be awesome, but the original hasn’t been updated in so long it doesn’t use the updated OPML spec

If such a curated list is able to be maintained on my site it would also be cool if I could export it in such a way (similar to OPML) as to dovetail it with social readers like Aperture, Yarns, or other Microsub servers to easily transport or mirror the data there.

Here are some related thoughts: https://boffosocko.com/2017/11/10/a-following-page/

I’m happy to chat about other useful/related features relating to this any time!

Replied to a tweet by Rotana TyRotana Ty (Twitter)
Rotana Ty, I’m curious if you’ve tried using any of the IndieWeb plugin suite for WordPress? Webmention/Semantic Linkback plugins for site-to-site notifications/conversation or Micropub plugin and clients for making posting simpler?
Replied to a post by Mike Rockwell (mike.rockwell.mx)
Is there actually a benefit to showing the Webmention field on your site? Does it actually get used? It feels like all of the Webmentions are automated through the protocol/API, not manually by copy and pasting a link. I’ve turned it off for now. We’ll see.
There are some sites that have receiving implemented but not sending, and it was primarily meant for that. (This is probably most often people who are using webmention.io as their proxy endpoint by registering and adding a line of code to their header. Something I do with both a TiddlyWiki and MediaWiki installs that don’t have custom software/plugins yet.)

It also serves to help visually indicate that your site supports the protocol if you don’t have a button/badge for it that points to something like https://mike.rockwell.mx/wp-json/webmention/1.0/endpoint. For those that care or are in-the-know there are manual services like https://telegraph.p3k.io/send-a-webmention or http://mention-tech.appspot.com/ which could be used as well.

On some sites I follow, I use those boxes about once or twice a month. I use it a bit more frequently on my own site to manually send myself webmentions from other sites that don’t send them, but which I come across either randomly or via refbacks. 

Replied to a tweet by Dan York (Twitter)

Dan, since you’re in the WordPress space, there are several pieces in place there. Akismet and other anti-spam tools can still be used to filter webmentions just like any other comment/response on your site.

If you moderate your responses on your site, the webmention plugin has an “approve & always allow” function as well as domain allow-listing for people you know and trust.

It also bears saying: there’s also nothing that says you have to display webmentions on your site either, you can use them simply as notifications on your back end.

In my experience, I’ve also seen people strip active links, scripts, etc. out of their received webmentions as a security precaution. I believe that the WordPress suite of IndieWeb plugins does this by default.

If you need/want to go further, you could work on implementing the Vouch extension of Webmention. Any additional ideas or brainstorming you’ve got to help mitigate these sorts of harms is most welcome.

For the record, for Webmention to work as a protocol, it requires a link to your site to actually appear on a public web page–something neither trackback/pingback required and made them even easier/cheaper to game.

Two awesome and interesting WordPress query strings for browsing websites:

  • ?orderby=modified
    • Example: https://ma.tt/?orderby=modified (Today, this indicates that for his 37th birthday post, Matt apparently went back and made a few tweaks/updates to some prior birthday posts.)
  • ?orderby=comment_count

These could be used in combination with a /feed/ path to get an update of a WordPress site, potentially for updating posts within one’s digital garden and distributing as a feed.

GWG in #wordpress 2021-01-18 ()