👓 WordPress is like a free buffet | Joseph Dickson

Read WordPress is like a free buffet by Joseph Dickson (joseph-dickson.com)
WordPress is a like a free buffet. You can do a lot very cheaply; but if you don’t know what you’re doing it will cost you later.
— Joseph Dickson

👓 Everything Old is New Again: Adventures in the IndieWeb | Desert of My Real Life

Replied to Everything Old is New Again: Adventures in the IndieWeb by Cathie LeBlancCathie LeBlanc (Desert of My Real Life)
I’ve written about my forays into the IndieWeb movement before. I have even written about how I feel like I’m moving to a philosophy of sharing my work that is kind of old school. Last week, I had the occasion to see a perfect example of how the “new” ways that I’m working are actually the old ways.

Kudos Cathie for rolling up your sleeves and delving in like this! You’re getting some fairly solid results and have far stronger grasp of what is going on than I certainly did in my first year–not to say that I’m much better off now to be honest.

The tougher part is that some of your post seems a bit misleading to me.

The couple of microformats related lines you’re adding in your child theme like add_theme_support( ‘microformats2’ ); are in fact declaring that your theme properly supports microformats v1, v2, and microdata which it doesn’t quite. Those lines don’t actually add support (as the hook might indicate), but tell other WordPress plugins that your theme is microformats compatible which may prevent them from adding particular pieces of redundant microformats related code.

While you’ve got an h-entry in your header file, you’re closing the related </div> just after the title so that if the body of your post includes a p-summary or an e-content microformat, parsers are likely to have problems. Instead you might want to do something similar in either your content.php (or other file that adds the body of your post) or your footer.php files where you close that div in one of those two files instead of in your header.php file. If you need it the article page on the wiki has a simple example of what the final result should look like.

My favorite template for how to add microformats to a WordPress theme is David Shanske’s fork of the TwentySixteen theme. Because of GitHub’s interface and the fact that he made changes in relatively small increments, you can look at the history of his changes (start with the oldest ones and move forward) and see the highlights of what he added and removed in individual files to effect the necessary changes. (He made some other drastic changes like removing Post Formats in preference to Post Kinds as well as some other non-microformats changes, so you’ll necessarily want to skip those particular changes.) I think I learned more about WordPress Themes by going through this one example a change at a time than any of the books or tutorials I’ve ever seen.

Another tool in addition to indiewebify.me is the Pin13 parser which will parse your page and give you some indication about what it is finding (or not) and how things are being nested (or not).

If you need some help, feel free to catch one of the WordPress folks in the IndieWeb chat. I suspect that since you’ve got the fortitude to dive into the code the way you have, that you’ll be able to puzzle it out.

🔖 Learning Gutenberg: Series Introduction | CSS-Tricks

Bookmarked Learning Gutenberg: Series Introduction (CSS-Tricks)
Hey CSS-Tricksters! 👋 We have a special long-form series we’re kicking off here totally dedicated to Gutenberg, a major change to the WordPress

📺 Finding things in WordPress core with GitHub and Grep | YouTube

Watched Finding things in WordPress core with GitHub and Grep by Ross WintleRoss Wintle from YouTube

A short video on using tools to search the WordPress core code for filters and actions. Tips and tricks for WordPress development with Github and grep.

A short and useful little tutorial. It’s small stepping stones like these that can lead you down the primrose path of some additional serious hacking.

hat tip: John Johnson

UI suggestion: Admin drop down filter for refbacks

Filed an Issue Refbacks for WordPress (GitHub)
Contribute to dshanske/wordpress-refback development by creating an account on GitHub.

Similar to the design set up for other comment types, it would be nice to have a filter for refbacks in the dropdown menu at /wp-admin/edit-comments.php. With the Webmentions plugin enabled, one is presented with the options to filter for “All Comment Types”, “Comments”, “Pings”, and “Webmentions”. Adding a filter for “Refbacks” would be incredibly helpful as well.

👓 Using the Last Seen Function in Simple Location | David Shanske

Read Using the Last Seen Function in Simple Location by David ShanskeDavid Shanske (david.shanske.com)
One of the features in Simple Location that doesn’t get much notice is the Last Seen functionality. Simple Location adds a section to your WordPress user profile called Last Reported Location. It allows you to set the last reported location for a given user.  It reports latitude, longitude, altit...

The Simple Location plugin for WordPress has some awesome power built into it. David does a great job here of explaining some of it’s additional behind-the-scenes power.

👓 Adding Custom Hooks in WordPress: Custom Actions | Code Envato Tuts+

Bookmarked Adding Custom Hooks in WordPress: Custom Actions (Code Envato Tuts+)
One of the cornerstones of building custom solutions in WordPress is having an understanding of hooks. In and of themselves, they aren't terribly difficult to understand, and we'll be covering a...

This kindly has some useful working examples.

👓 The Beginner’s Guide to WordPress Actions and Filters | Code Envato Tuts+

Read The Beginner's Guide to WordPress Actions and Filters (Code Envato Tuts+)
When it comes to professional WordPress development, it's imperative that developers understand both actions and filters - that is, it's important to understand WordPress hooks. Simply put, hooks...

A clean and simple tutorial…

👓 Simple Location Version 3.5.2 Released | David Shanske

Liked Simple Location Version 3.5.2 Released by David ShanskeDavid Shanske (david.shanske.com)
As an update to the release I did earlier this week, I’ve released version 3.5.2 of Simple Location for WordPress. It fixes a long standing visibility issue, fixes widget titles which were introduced in 3.5, and adds a variety of style changes provided by a third party submitter(Thanks Asuh.com). ...

Simple Location’s Last Seen widget is revealing private locations

Filed an Issue Simple Location Plugin for WordPress (GitHub)
Adds Basic Location Support to Wordpress. Contribute to dshanske/simple-location development by creating an account on GitHub.

Using the version 3.5.2 of Simple Location, I’m most recently checked into a location that is marked as private, but the location widget indicates “Private” followed by the exact street address to the private location to which I’m checked in. Previously the widget showed the most recent public location, but now it’s explicitly uncovering private locations.

Perhaps it’s related to the recent fix that was causing private posts to be marked public?

Simple Location’s “Last Seen” widget is revealing private locations.

👓 The year you actually start to like your CMS | Nieman Journalism Lab | Eric Ulken

Read The year you actually start to like your CMS by Eric UlkenEric Ulken (Nieman Lab)
"If we do it right, users benefit from a feedback loop that helps make our work more valuable and relevant to them. And no journalist ever again has to wear their clunky CMS as a badge of honor."

Without saying it directly, there’s a very IndieWeb flavor to this piece. I’d love to see more journalists and technologists who are working in journalism contributing to improving the web.  The Nieman Lab’s collection of Predictions for Journalism in 2019 also has some other IndieWeb-centric articles for those who might be interested.

Eric Ulken, product director for newsroom tools at the USA TODAY NETWORK, has a great list of UI elements in the article that many journalists, newsrooms, and even average people would love to see built into content management systems. I hope that as people build and iterate that they write about their experiences and open source pieces so others can use and leverage them.

Personally, I think that W3C specs like Webmention, Micropub, and Microsub can help change the tide in the coming year.

Some things your tools will soon do for you — if they don’t already:

  • Automatically find and link relevant background material.
  • Suggest topics and contextualize newly created content as part of a bigger story arc, when relevant.
  • Show which topics, story forms and content types, in the aggregate, are resonating with priority audience segments and help you take action based on that info.
  • Dynamically alert you when there’s potential for promoting your work on other platforms and help you prioritize those efforts.
  • Keep track of the things you’ve published, show you how they’re doing with key audiences and suggest follow-up opportunities.
  • Call out popular evergreen content that could use freshening.
  • Run headline tests and other content experiments directly from the authoring and curation environment.
  • Identify missed opportunities and help you find out where your content fell flat with readers.
  • Enable the creation of mobile-first multimedia narratives and other non-text story forms.
  • Help you productively interact with your audiences and help them inform your coverage.
  • Calculate — at the staff, team and individual level — effort spent on things that don’t serve audiences well (thereby helping you devote more time to the things that do).
  • Elevate your phone from in-the-field last resort to full-fledged content creation and management tool, because the best device is the one you have with you.

Highlights, Quotes, Annotations, & Marginalia

Today’s leading-edge content tools are integrated context, collaboration and insight machines. We’re moving from unidirectional publishing of articles to organizing all our work and closing the feedback loop with our customers. I call this “full-stack publishing”.  

This sounds a little bit like what the IndieWeb is building for itself!

December 21, 2018 at 08:02PM

And while content analytics tools (e.g., Chartbeat, Parsely, Content Insights) and feedback platforms (e.g., Hearken, GroundSource) have thankfully helped close the gap, the core content management experience remains, for most of us, little improved when it comes to including the audience in the process.  

December 21, 2018 at 08:00PM