Watched "Tiger King" Not Your Average Joe from Netflix
Directed by Rebecca Chaiklin, Eric Goode. With Bhagavan Antle, Carole Baskin, Howard Baskin, Susan Bass. Met Joe Exotic, the gun-toting operator of an Oklahoma big cat park. He's been accused of hiring someone to kill his chief rival Carole Baskin.
I’ve met all too many Joes. He may seem like a caricature to many, but there are a lot of him out there. The entirety of this seems to me like a replaying of the right/left political battle, but translated immediately into culture and with a more extreme bent. Even the promo poster properly puts Joe Exotic on the right and Carole Baskin on the left.
Watched "Star Trek: Picard" Maps and Legends from CBS All Access
Directed by Hanelle M. Culpepper. Without the support of Starfleet, Picard turns to Dr. Agnes Jurati and his estranged colleague Raffi Musiker for help in finding the truth about Dahj, unaware that hidden enemies are also interested in what he'll find.
I have to wonder if there are at least two previously “inactivated” sentient androids roaming around, how many more might there be that we don’t know about? Dozens? Hundreds? Thousands? … What happens when they become “activated”? Could make for a great plot twist at the end? Let’s see.
Watched "Star Trek: Picard" Remembrance from CBS All Access
Directed by Hanelle M. Culpepper. Fourteen years after retiring from Starfleet, Jean-Luc Picard, still haunted by the death of Data, is living a quiet life on his family vineyard when a woman comes to him for help.
Not as much of the morality tale that previous incarnations of Star Trek have been. This does have an anti-AI bent that should be interesting to follow, so maybe a bit of a modern day morality play here.
Watched "The West Wing" What Kind of Day Has It Been from Netflix
Directed by Thomas Schlamme. A stealth fighter is shot down over Iraq, leading to Bartlet ordering a military rescue as Toby worries about his brother trapped on a space shuttle orbiting the Earth. CJ deals with the ramifications of misleading the press about the rescue as the staff prepares for a town hall meeting that night. The town hall meeting goes well until the President leaves...and shots ring out.
Watched Lecture 4 of 24: Augustine's Pagan and Christian Audience by Charles Mathewes from The City of God (Books That Matter) | The Great Courses
Before delving into the text of The City of God, Professor Mathewes sets the stage with some context about the many audiences that Augustine was writing for, as well as the arguments against Christians that he was confronting. See how Augustine co-opted Roman notions of city" and "glory" and applied them to his divine purpose."
A fascinating lecture about the word City of the title and the first word of the book with a tad about the rest of the first sentence!
Watched Lecture 3 of 24: The Sack of Rome, 410 A.D. by Charles Mathewes from The City of God (Books That Matter) | The Great Courses
While Roman elites viewed the sack of Rome as a turning point that changed the world forever, the event itself lasted only three days and served more as a catalyst for change than a cataclysm in its own right. In this lecture, you'll find out why the sack was so monumental, and how it inspired Augustine to write The City of God.
Sack of Rome as a context for the book.

Watched Lecture 18: Arguing with Paul? by Dale B. Martin from RLST 152: Introduction to the New Testament History and Literature

Early Christianity presents us with a wide diversity in attitudes towards the law. There were also many different Christologies circulating in different communities. The book of James presents one unique perspective. It seems to be written in the tradition of Jewish wisdom literature in its presentation of sayings and its concern for the poor. James also presents a view of works and faith that seems to oppose Pauline teaching. However, the terms "faith" and "works" function differently in Paul's writings and in the book of James

  • 00:00 - Chapter 1. Diversity in Early Christianity: Attitudes towards the Jewish Law
  • 03:57 - Chapter 2. Diversity in Early Christianity: Christology
  • 21:03 - Chapter 3. James as Jewish Wisdom Literature
  • 27:47 - Chapter 4. Faith and Works in James in Comparison to Paul

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses

Interesting to think about how much of our culture is built on the writings of the rich and privileged and the compounding effect it has had over the millennia. 
Watched Lecture 17: Paul's Disciples by Dale B. Martin from RLST 152: Introduction to the New Testament History and Literature
Introduction to New Testament (RLST 152) In ancient times, documents that were falsely attributed to an author, called pseudepigrapha, were a common phenomen...

In ancient times, documents that were falsely attributed to an author, called pseudepigrapha, were a common phenomenon. Both the Letters to the Colossians and Ephesians are most likely pseudonymous works attributed to the Apostle Paul. The writer of Colossians assures his readers that they already possess all the benefits of salvation and do not need to observe rules concerning feast days, Sabbaths, and worship of the angels. Ephesians seems somewhat based on Colossians, although it reads more like an ethical or moral treatise. Both letters differ from Pauline Christology in their realized eschatology and high Christology.

  • 00:00 - Chapter 1. Ancient Pseudepigraphy
  • 10:42 - Chapter 2. The Pseudepigraphic Letters to the Colossians and Ephesians
  • 22:21 - Chapter 3. The Occasion of the Writing of Colossians
  • 37:15 - Chapter 4. The Letter to the Ephesians as Treatise
  • 42:26 - Chapter 5. Major Differences between Colossians and Ephesians and Pauline Christianity

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses

Also as I’m looking at the evolution of the early Christian church, many of the changes from the teachings of Jesus and the re-framing by Paul and then other subsequent writers and church elders seemed to work to re-entrench the patriarchy and give power back to the wealthy and powerful. Jesus and Paul seemed to have a much more egalitarian outlook which was walked by by later writings. 

This may be harder to “prove” to present-day Christians because most don’t view the bible from a historical perspective. Too many modern Christians seem to take too much of Colossians and Ephesians to heart in terms of gender roles. I might suggest that much of the gender toxicity that we’ve seen in Western history may be attributed to these two pseudepigraphical books.

Watched The Reason Paul Schneider Left Parks And Rec After Season 2 from YouTube

The Reason Paul Schneider Left Parks And Rec After Season 2
We all remember Parks and Recreation season 2: Leslie was trying to fix the pit. Andy and April began their triumphant weirdo love story. Chris Traeger and Ben Wyatt joined the merry band of civil servants. But do you remember Mark Brendanawicz?

Paul Schneider played Mark, the Pawnee, Indiana city planner who was a relatively central character on Parks and Recreation's first season and who had a scrapped romance subplot with Amy Poehler's Leslie Knope. In the second season, Mark's purpose began to flounder despite a second, and ultimately crumbled, romance with Rashida Jones' Ann Perkins. During the Parks and Rec season 2 finale, Mark announced he was leaving city government for a job with a private-sector construction company...

...which earned him a new nickname from Leslie, "Mark Brendanaquits”, and he was never heard from again. Chris and Ben's entrance into Parks and Recreation as guest characters on season 2 proved to be the perfect gift in disguise to slip Mark's departure past everyone with few questions asked.

Looking back, there are some mysteries left unsolved. Why have Mark leave at all, and why did Paul Schneider exit Parks and Recreation and never return?

In short, Paul Schneider left Parks and Recreation because he felt sidelined. Several years after the fact, the actor opened up about his Parks departure in an interview with Screen Crush, revealing that he felt he'd been at a creative crossroads with the series' writers after Mark's character was altered from the first season. The early episodes of Parks and Rec are rougher and feature more tension and disdain between the characters, just like its predecessor, The Office. Mark Brendanawicz's character is a relic of that previous style, and he was reportedly an even less likable character in earlier versions of Parks and Recreation. A shift in emotional perspective came about as the series continued on, and while it worked out well for many principal characters, it didn't for Mark. Keep watching the video to see the reason Paul Schneider left Parks and Rec after season 2.

I vaguely remember him from the beginning, but mostly I remember Leslie continually badmouthing Mark Brendanawicz in later seasons. It seemed relatively obvious to me that he would leave given his minimal interaction on the show from the beginning of the series to the end of the first season. These sorts of situations are never fun for the agents/managers, particularly if the writing staff and producers aren’t sure what they’re doing or where the show is going.
Watched COVID-19: The Exponential Power of Now - With Prof. Nicholas Jewell by  Mathematical Sciences Research Institute (MSRI) Mathematical Sciences Research Institute (MSRI) from YouTube

Where are we with COVID-19, and how are mathematical models and statistics helping us develop strategies to overcome the burden of infections. Nicholas P. Jewell is Chair of Biostatistics and Epidemiology at the London School of Medicine and Tropical Medicine and Professor of the Graduate School (Biostatistics and Statistics) at the University of California, Berkeley.

A brief overview of some of the math and epidemiology for the coronavirus. A vaccine is going to be 12-18 months away at best. There are going to be multiple waves of this. Exponential growth is going to be the serious killer here. Reinfection may be a possible potential concern.

Terry Tao 2019-2020 Novel Coronavirus outbreak: mathematics of epidemics, and what it can and cannot tell us (Nicolas Jewell) ()