RSVPed Attending Homebrew Website Club West Coast 2020-08-05

Any questions? Ask in the IndieWeb chat!
Notes for the meetup's etherpad.
This week's event host: Chris Aldrich

Homebrew Website Club is a meetup for anyone interested in personal websites and a distributed web. Whether you’re a blogger, coder, designer, or just someone who wants to improve their presence on the web, this meetup is for you.

6:00pm–7:30pm IndieWeb Meetup

* Demos of personal website breakthroughs
* Discussion around the independent web
* Get to know other members of the IndieWeb!
* Create or update your personal web site!
* Finish that blog post you’ve been working on!

Join a community with like-minded interests. Bring friends that want a personal site, or are interested in a healthy, independent web!

RSVP (optional)

If your website supports it, post an indie RSVP.
Or, log in and click “I'm Going” on the event. If none of that means anything to you, don't worry about it; just show up!

Now weekly!

Check events.indieweb.org for next week's meetup! There are some meetups in European and US Eastern time zones as well.

I’m hosting Homebrew Website Club next Wednesday and hope you’ll be able to join us.
Watched Anatomy of a Great Faculty Website by Steve RyanSteve Ryan from WPCampus 2020 Online - July 29-30 - Where WordPress meets Higher Education

Within higher education, requests to build websites for individual faculty members sit at the absolute bottom of the work queue for most marketing/communications teams. If this type of product is offered at all, it typically uses a self-service model; the institution will provide the platform while the faculty member will provide the content. And while this is the most sustainable model for most small and mid-sized web teams, it tends to produce multiple websites that are ineffective at communicating even simple messages. Worse, they have a high tendency to become the poorest reflections of the institution with a high rate of abandonment or misuse.

Let's fix that tendency together. With a careful examination of what really matters to faculty members who are looking to create and maintain their own websites, we can begin to build better sites. With better sites (and a little luck), you can start to derive value from the project at the bottom of your work pile.

Together we'll talk about:

  • A simple analysis of the types of content that you'll typically find within a faculty website.
  • A "wish list" for the types of content that you (as a marketer) would really like to see from these types of sites.
  • A working example of a theme that delivers on these key concepts and adds some "quick wins" which makes for a better experience.
  • How to leverage the capabilities of WordPress multisite to produce more value from collections of these type of sites.

This is an awesome little session at WPCampus 2020 Online. (Video for it available shortly.) It reminds me a lot of the Drupal project Open Scholar that does something similar. I can see it being useful for folks in the Domain of One’s Own space.

I totally want to start using something like this myself to not only test it out, but to build in the proper microformats v2 mark up so that it’s IndieWeb friendly. Perhaps a project at the planned IWC Pop-up Theme raising session?

Replied to a tweet by Aram Zucker-ScharffAram Zucker-Scharff (Twitter)
#IndieWeb to the rescue. There are a few great options for this. None of which should require you to write any code! 

One of my favorite is Kevin Marks’ Noter Live (open source) which is great for live tweeting and creating long threads quickly, especially at conferences. When you’re done, it’s kept a record of everything which you can quickly cut/paste as HTML into your website for an instant archive post.

Another option if your website supports the Micropub spec (perhaps with a plugin?) ThreadReaderApp recently added support to let you unroll the thread and you can go to your account and authenticate to your website and post the thread with one click.

I’ll also note that WordPress’ Gutenberg just added the ability to unroll threads to websites built with it as well. 

In addition to general public use, these could actually be the backbone of an interesting journalistic live notebook for reporters in the field who could quickly compile/archive their threads for expanded articles later on.

Read IndieAuth 3.5.0 for WordPress Released by David ShanskeDavid Shanske (david.shanske.com)
Earlier in the week, I noted the release of IndieAuth 3.5.0, but I didn’t explain the major under the hood changes that occurred here in a post, which I need to do as at least one person is experiencing issues(probably necessitating a 3.5.1 as soon as I figure out why.) I also noted I forgot to de...
Read Micropub 2.2.0 for WordPress Released by David ShanskeDavid Shanske (david.shanske.com)
Micropub 2.2.0 has one major change in it. IndieAuth client code was removed. This code now lives in the IndieAuth plugin. This means that Micropub does not check for scopes. It uses the built-in WordPress capability system to determine if an action should be performed. The IndieAuth plugin limits c...
Read People Seem Confused about IndieAuth by David ShanskeDavid Shanske (david.shanske.com)
When I first started in the IndieWeb community, IndieAuth confused me. It confused me up until I built an IndieAuth endpoint for WordPress. It may confuse you as well. And that has been a problem in its adoption. The biggest confusion seems to be conflating IndieAuth and IndieAuth.com. IndieAuth.com...
Read IndieAuth.com vs IndieAuth by Nathan DeGruchyNathan DeGruchy (Verily)

David Shanske is one of the authors of one of the core IndieWeb plugins for WordPress: IndieAuth. It looks like he is depricating the use of IndieAuth.com as a provider. Makes sense with WordPress as the idea is really to use the built-in authentication method in WordPress itself, not another provider.

So, going forward, I’ve decided that I’ll be disabling the code from the IndieWeb WordPress plugin that allows you to use IndieAuth.com in favor of the built-in solution. Those who want to use an external service will still be able to do so, but this will be an ‘expert’ feature. Because enabling a plugin and it just working is what most people want.

David Shanske on the future of the WordPress IndieAuth Plugin

Honestly, I didn’t even know you could use IndieAuth.com as a provider. I assumed when I set it up that the entire idea was to use your site as a sort of IAM or SSO provider. I guess this confirms that my assumption was correct.

Keep up the great work, guys!

Bookmarked Domain Kits | Guides to building out your domain by EduHack (domains.eduhack.eu)
Do you have an internet Domain of One’s Own? What is it? Why would you want one? Would you like to try one out? What can you do with it? How do you build it?
Replied to a tweet by Ian BrownIan Brown (Twitter)
#IndieWeb interoperability FTW!
Read Using Your Site As Your Login (anaulin.org)
The most broadly useful technology I’ve encountered in the Indieweb world is the ability to use your personal site as your login on other sites. The idea is beautifully simple. A service that wants to authenticate you can look at your website, read any rel="me" links you’ve added to it, and use ...
Read Andrew Sullivan: See You Next Friday (Intelligencer)
If the mainstream media will not host a diversity of opinion, then the nonmainstream needs to pick up the slack. That’s what I’ll be doing next.
This is interesting, though sad to see he’s going to Substack to run his new blog incarnation. I suspect he’s following the model of Jonah Goldberg who is doing roughly the same thing. The “newsletter trend” as a means of running a blog and attempting to monetize it is certainly an interesting one. I’m curious how valuable readers find it? I wish there were some better open web versions that were easier for individuals to run in an IndieWeb fashion. The pattern is a lot like Patreon and some others, but here there is the appearance of more publishing control as well as the removal of the appearance of begging for money to fund something.