Watched "The West Wing" The Warfare of Genghis Khan from HBO Max
Directed by Bill D'Elia. With Dulé Hill, Allison Janney, Joshua Malina, Janel Moloney. A nuclear device is tested in the Indian Ocean, but none of the known nuclear powers will claim responsibility, leading to the possibility of a terrorist group holding missile tests. Vice President Russell, heretofore dismissed by west wing staff as a joke, a four-term congressman alleged to be securely in the pocket of a large Colorado mining company, recalls a junket he'd taken early in his ...
One of my favorite episodes. The Chris Aldrich episode.
RSVPed Attending A Look at Plymouth State University’s ACE Framework

Apr 21, 8:15 AM 30 minDOM21
Speakers:Robin DeRosa, Martha Burtis and Dave Cormier
Chair: Dave Cormier

In this session Dave Cormier (University of Windsor) talks with Robin De Rosa and Martha Burtis about of Plymouth State University to discuss the development and rationale behind the ACE Framework (https://colab.plymouthcreate.net/ace/), a mission-aligned instructional framework centered around Adaptability, Connection, and Equity (ACE). While the ACE Framework was initially developed in response to the “great pivot” of Spring 2020 as a result of the global pandemic, the goal was to abstract these recommendations and lessons from any singular event (or technology) in order ground the framework in a broader re-thinking of practice as a means to effect a more humane approach to teaching and learning.

This session not only provides insight into the thinking behind and development of the framework during COVID-19, but also demonstrates specific examples of how and why the framework can and has been used.

Watched Taking Care: Affective Labor in Digital Learning from OEERxDomains2021 (YouTube)

Apr 21, 4:45 AM 30 min

Speakers:Lee Skallerup Bessette and Susannah McGowan

Openness can be fraught for faculty; the classroom has often been a sanctuary of academic freedom and teaching approaches are personal in the strongest sense. In preparing our faculty for the Fall 2020 semester, we, as faculty developers and academic technologists at CNDLS at Georgetown University, were working with faculty who were openly discussing their pedagogy and the limits of their knowledge of digital tools and learning strategies.

The work moved us past knowing “what works” or “what’s possible” (Hutchings, 2000) in using tools into the realm of affective labor (Horthchild, 2012), where we managed a complex interplay of support, emotions, and uncertainty in order to evoke the proper emotions from faculty. To make our expertise on pedagogy and digital tools “stick” (Ahmed, 2010) we worked within our own emotions while fielding the emotions of faculty. But this work, while taxing, has borne fruit: more faculty are embracing open pedagogical practices such as Domains, ungrading (Blum & Kohn, 2020), and flipping the classroom (Talbert, 2017). The presentation will work to uncover the affective labor we have been practicing, ways to acknowledge it, and what joys it can bring.

  • Ahmed, S. (2010). The Cultural Politics of Emotion. Routledge.
  • Blum, S. D., & Kohn, A. (2020). Ungrading: Why Rating Students Undermines Learning (And What to Do Instead). West Virginia University Press.
  • Hochschild, A.R. (2012). The Managed Heart: Commercialization of Human Feeling (3rd ed.). University of California Press.
  • Hutchings, P. 2000. Approaching the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning. In Opening Lines: Approaches to the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning, edited by P. Hutchings, 1–10.
  • Talbert, R. (2017). Flipped learning: A guide for higher education faculty. Stylus Publishing, LLC.
Watched Using WordPress Multisiste during a Pandemic from OERxDomains 2021 (YouTube)

Apr 21, 4:15 AM 28 min

This discussion focuses around the ways in which various campuses experienced the impact of pandemic on the various tools and platforms they supported on campus with a specific focus on WordPress Mutlisite, although it proves to be a broader conversation around the challenges of shifting not only online, but from synchronous to asynchronous ways of imagining teaching and learning.

RSVPed Attending Outside Their Domain: Introducing German Higher Ed to Domain of One's Own

Apr 21, 3:30 AM 30 min
Speakers:Christian Friedrich and Katharina Schulz
The concepts and ideas around a Domain of One’s Own (DoOO) are not yet widely known or implemented in Germany. While there is a fairly strong ethos of independence in parts of Germany’s OER and ed-tech communities, DoOO has not gained traction.

In this session, we will present a project that started in February 2020. The project’s aim is to provide easily accessible information about DoOO as well as ready-made materials for those who would like to implement DoOO in their teaching. After basic research, we started by recording podcast conversations that explore DoOO from different angles, covering a student’s perspective as well as technical, didactical and strategic aspects. Based on these conversations, our own experiences with DoOO and available materials, we are developing guidelines and checklists for different stakeholders. The project Domain of One’s Own is funded by the Hamburg University of Applied Sciences (HAW HH) as part of the Hamburg Open Online University (HOOU), a cooperation of several institutions of higher education in Hamburg.

One of the impulses for our project was Educause’s “7 Things You Should Know About a Domain of One’s Own”, which prompted the idea of producing similar materials tailored for the German Higher Ed landscape, while seminal projects at the University of Mary Washington and at Coventry University serve as important reference points. For the German discourse, discussions around digital literacies can provide a basis for starting the conversation about Domains.

In our pre-recorded conversation with Jim Groom, we share an insight into our experiences so far and talk about the challenges connected with advocating for a concept largely based on shifting control from teacher to student in a rather traditional higher education landscape like Germany. During the live session, we look forward to engaging with the communities around OER and DoOO by taking up questions and comments from the chat. With this session, we also hope to spark conversations around how to tackle more conservative spheres of higher education. Some of the questions that could be addressed are:

What can a conservative and largely publicly funded Higher Ed landscape gain from DoOO?
What kinds of reward structures, staffing structures, technological infrastructure and incentives are ideal for DoOO?
What kinds of success stories or good practices can you share about introducing DoOO?
EDUCAUSE (2019). 7 Things You Should Know About a Domain of One’s Own. [PDF] Available at: https://library.educause.edu/resources/2019/10/7-things-you-should-know-about-a-domain-of-ones-own [Accessed 09 April 2021].
Coventry University Group (n.d.). Coventry Domains. [online] Available at: https://coventry.domains [Accessed 09 April 2021].
University of Mary Washington (n.d.). Domain of One’s Own. [online] Available at: https://umw.domains [Accessed 09 April 2021].
Friedrich, C. (2019). Digital Literacies und Offenheit: Was wir tun, damit Menschen das Freie Netz formen können. [online] Available at: https://blog.wikimedia.de/2019/06/27/digital-literacies-und-offenheit-was-wir-tun-damit-menschen-das-freie-netz-formen-koennen/ [Accessed 09 April 2021].

RSVPed Attending What I learned from 20 years of giving domains as Christmas presents: Tools and concepts for owning an online identity

Apr 21, 3:00 AM 20 minDOM21
Speaker:Dominik Lukes

I bought my first domain on the 15th of April 2000. Now, more than 20 years later, I have almost 30 domains to my name with a few expired ones in the rear view mirror. Not all those domains are for me, though. I have set up domains for projects as gifts to friends and family members. I’ve given domains for birthdays, Christmas and to celebrate the birth of a child. For some, I also host their sites, others their emails.

My first domain was to share teaching materials before the concept of Creative Commons was even conceived. Some domains were to help projects but most were about maintaining online identity. This session will outline the key lessons I’ve learned over the years about online identity, the technology required to maintain it and the knowledge, skills and mindset involved. It will cover:

• Key knowledge and skills required to own a domain
• Pitfalls and hidden difficulties with domain ownership
• Ways of leveraging a domain into a website or an email presence
• Changes in the processes and options over the last 20 years and future prospects
• Novel ways of hosting websites, emails and identities
• Dilemmas faced by individuals and institutions in maintaining online identities

Watched Opening Plenary OERxDomains21: Joy and Care in Open Education in times of pandemic with Tutaleni Asino, Orna Farrell, Nicolas Garcia and Catherine Stihler from YouTube

Apr 21, 2:00 AM 45 min
Speakers:Catherine Stihler, Nicolas Garcia, Tutaleni Asino and Orna Farrell
Chair: Joe Wilson

Our conference opens with a plenary session: Joy and Care in Open Education in Times of Pandemic. We are delighted to welcome a panel comprising Tuteleni Aseno from Oklahoma State University, Nicolas Garcia, student president at City of Glasgow College, Orna Farrell from Dublin City University and Catherine Stihler, CEO of Creative Commons. We are also looking forward to thought provoking keynotes from Jasmine Roberts, Ohio State University, Laura Gibbs from the Tiny Tales OER Project (formerly University of Oklahoma) and Rajiv Jhangiani from Kwantlen Polytechnic University in British Columbia.