Read Understanding .htaccess by Lauren Brumfield (labrumfield.com)
All Reclaim Hosting servers run Apache Web Server Software. So when an account is provisioned the server creates a directive telling Apache what a user’s domain is and where the files for that domain are located on the server. A single server is able to host multiple sites this way because Apache...
Some great basic information and resources here for understanding and working with .htaccess.
Bookmarked WordPress Theme Components (WP Theme Components)
Theme components are bite sized code snippets that can be reused across multiple themes, but are either too small or don’t make sense to be released as a plugin. Stop cluttering up your functions.php file and start using theme components! Who are theme components for? Th...
This looks interesting and useful. Perhaps a potential solution for adding small tidbits of microformats mark up to one’s theme at a more granular level than the mf2 plugin? I can see use cases for other snippets too like accepting Webmentions automatically, etc.
Read Autonomy Online: A Case For The IndieWeb by Ana RodriguesAna Rodrigues (Smashing Magazine)
There is an alternative to corporate bubbles online — it’s called the IndieWeb. Build your own personal websites, control your online presence, and learn on your own terms. Web 2.0 celebrated the idea of everyone being able to contribute to the web regardless of their technical skill and knowledge. Its major features include self-publishing platforms, social networking websites, “tagging”, “liking”, and bookmarking.
A great overview of the IndieWeb for developers and why one should delve into it deeply. 

Way to go Ana!

Read WP Rig Starter Theme Project Looking for New Maintainers (WordPress Tavern)
A couple of years ago, Morten Rand-Hendriksen launched WP Rig for WordPress. The goal was to bring a modern starter theme and build process to the theme development community. Now, he and the curre…
I couldn’t take this sort of project over, but it looks like something interesting to look into.
Read BREAD, not CRUD (paul-m-jones.com)

Several developers have asked me what "BREAD" means in web applications. Most everyone knows that CRUD is "create, read, update, delete," but I think that misses an important aspect of web apps: the listing of records to select from.

I don't recall where I first heard the term BREAD; it stands for "browse, read, edit, add, delete". That covers more of what common web apps do, including the record listings. It even sounds nicer: "crud" is something icky, but "bread" is warm and fulfilling. That's why I tend to use the term BREAD instead of CRUD, especially when it comes to Solar and action-method names in the application logic.

RSVPed Attending Design for Cognitive Bias Launch Party!

Come celebrate the launch of my new book, Design for Cognitive Bias. Each ticket includes the price of a copy of the book!

About this Event

Our users have biases and so do we. My new book, Design for Cognitive Bias, explores how design and content strategy can help keep them at bay (or use them for good). Let's celebrate the launch!

  • We'll start with a book reading
  • Then I'll chat with Tiny MBA author Alex Hillman about the book
  • Then we'll do audience Q&A
  • Then we'll do something called an idea exchange. (I'll explain later but I promise it'll be fun!)

Like I said, price of admission includes a digital copy of the book. YOU get a book! And YOU get a book! And YOU get a book! (You get the idea).

Special thanks to Indy Hall for virtually hosting this event!

I'm really looking forward to this. It's been a long road to get here and I hope you'll celebrate with me! :)

My remarkable friend David Dylan Thomas has a a new book entitled Design for Cognitive Bias coming out on August 25th from A Book Apart. Knowing his background and abilities, it will be a must-read for any web designer or developer.

We humans are messy, illogical creatures who like to imagine we’re in control—but we blithely let our biases lead us astray. In Design for Cognitive Bias, David Dylan Thomas lays bare the irrational forces that shape our everyday decisions and, inevitably, inform the experiences we craft. Once we grasp the logic powering these forces, we stand a fighting chance of confronting them, tempering them, and even harnessing them for good. Come along on a whirlwind tour of the cognitive biases that encroach on our lives and our work, and learn to start designing more consciously.

 If you’re free on Friday, August 28th there’s also a launch party for the book! The price of admission also includes a discounted copy of the e-book. RSVP now.

I’m hoping I can talk him into doing a talk or presentation for my friends in the IndieWeb community. He’s a great and thoughtful person and speaker, so I expect to see him around the design and development talk circuit for a lot of the coming year. If you have a conference coming up, I recommend you book him now before he’s over-scheduled.

Read HTTP 451 (en.wikipedia.org)
In computer networking, HTTP 451 Unavailable For Legal Reasons is an error status code of the HTTP protocol to be displayed when the user requests a resource which cannot be served for legal reasons, such as a web page censored by a government. The number 451 is a reference to Ray Bradbury's 1953 dystopian novel Fahrenheit 451, in which books are outlawed.[2] 451 intends to provide more information than 403 Forbidden, which is often used for the same purpose.[3] This status code is standardized in RFC 7725.
I love that it’s a subtle nod to Fahrenheit 451.
Read Fun and Done by David BryantDavid Bryant (disquisitioner.com)
Success! As the result of today's project day at IndieWebCamp West I now have a working color scheme selector. In the upper right corner of this page you'll see a slider that'll let you choose a light or dark color scheme for this and every other page on my site. Most of the implementation is nearly...
Read IndieWebCamp West -- Learn + Do by David BryantDavid Bryant (disquisitioner.com)
Excellent first day yesterday at IndieWebCamp West with site demos that inspired and sessions that informed. I saw several folks with light/dark color theme selectors on their sites so that's my primary task for today's "hands-on" project day. I also got some great glimpses at site automation tools ...

Color Theme Switcher by Max Böck

Bookmarked Color Theme Switcher by Max BöckMax Böck (mxb.dev)
Let users customize your website with their favorite color scheme! Your site has a dark mode? That's cute. Mine has ten different themes now, and they're all named after Mario Kart race tracks.
I love the idea of this sort of color theme switcher. Reminiscent of the sort of functionality built into TiddlyWiki. I suspect that some of the code built into WordPress’ Customizer could be repurposed to give people the ability to do this in the WordPress world.
Read Building a WordPress Theme From Scratch by Joseph DicksonJoseph Dickson (joseph-dickson.com)
I’m a fan of using WordPress to build custom websites. So I’ve decided to start a tutorial series and share how I go about building a theme from scratch. No frameworks or starter themes.
Joseph has a great little series here on creating WordPress themes from scratch. Can’t wait to read the rest of it.