👓 AMC to Raise Stubs A-List Subscription Price in Select States | Hollywood Reporter

Read AMC to Raise Stubs A-List Subscription Price in Select States (The Hollywood Reporter)
The circuit in 2019 will raise pricing for its ticket app, where it has proven most popular.
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👓 MoviePass Rival Sinemia Drops Prices to Dirt Cheap on Weekdays | Gizmodo

Read MoviePass Rival Sinemia Drops Prices to Dirt Cheap on Weekdays (Gizmodo)
MoviePass broke the mold on theater subscription services and broke itself in the process, but the whole idea itself is not dead. Sinemia is carrying on with more modest deals, and it’s now offering weekday-only subscription plans that start at $4 per month.
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👓 Trump, no longer ratings gold, loses his prime-time spot on Fox News | Politico

Read Trump, no longer ratings gold, loses his prime-time spot on Fox News (POLITICO)
In a crucial period with the midterms less than a month away, some in the White House are worried that the president is losing a prime-time megaphone to his base.

Perhaps I’m wrong, but in the past I don’t recall any of the networks carrying full coverage of any rallies like these except perhaps the nominating conventions; even then they did it somewhat begrudgingly or only with partial coverage? At best, the coverage of these was small individual soundbites of candidates. Fox news has obviously and sadly been using them more for entertainment value than for any news value they might have had. Could this new coverage be coined liefotainment? There certainly isn’t any journalistic value in full coverage. I wonder if they’ll be carrying flaming-cross to flaming-cross coverage of KKK rallies next?

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👓 AMC's MoviePass competitor has 400,000 subscribers after 14 weeks | Engadget

Read AMC's MoviePass competitor has 400,000 subscribers after 14 weeks (Engadget)
Looks like AMC's MoviePass competitor is doing well.
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👓 Bloomberg's TicToc is starting to build a brand beyond Twitter | Digiday

Read Bloomberg's TicToc is starting to build a brand beyond Twitter (Digiday)
Begun as a Twitter network, TicToc now includes a podcast and newsletter and is developing a website.
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👓 SiriusXM to Acquire Pandora, Creating World’s Largest Audio Entertainment Company | Pandora

Read SiriusXM to Acquire Pandora, Creating World’s Largest Audio Entertainment Company (blog.pandora.com)
You may have noticed that big things are happening at Pandora. Earlier today, we announced that we’ve entered into an agreement to be acquired by SiriusXM, in an all-stock transaction, valued at approximately $3.5 billion. Here’s what this means for our listeners, and why we’re excited: First...
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👓 Cinematic train wreck, “The Room”, is now on YouTube in its entirety | Tech Crunch

Read Cinematic train wreck, “The Room”, is now on YouTube in its entirety (TechCrunch)
The Room has been ranked with Plan 9 From Outer Space as a strong contender for the “best” worst movie ever made — and it’s now available in its entirety on YouTube. Written, directed, and starring Tommy Wiseau, The Room belongs in the same category as Plan 9, and Coven (whi…
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👓 Bob Greenblatt stepping down as NBC Entertainment chairman | Los Angeles Times

Read Bob Greenblatt stepping down as NBC Entertainment chairman (Los Angeles Times)
Bob Greenblatt has spent nearly eight years running NBC Entertainment, a period that saw the peacock network return to prosperity.
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👓 Sorry, Sony Music, you don’t own the rights to Bach’s music on Facebook | Ars Technica

Read Sorry, Sony Music, you don’t own the rights to Bach’s music on Facebook (Ars Technica)
Public shaming forces publisher to abandon ridiculous claim to classical music.

When is the industry going to finally fix this issue of false positives like this. Surely in the case of Bach, it should be even easier?

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👓 What Do They Want from Us? On the Return of Big Bookstore Chains | The Millions

Read What Do They Want from Us? On the Return of Big Bookstore Chains by Jon Roemer (The Millions)

Bookstores have become cultural Rorschach tests. After the past decade or so, you’ve either been traumatized by watching your favorite store go dark, or you’re fine with the coffee and craft cocktails now served alongside exquisitely curated books.

This fall begins a new era, or maybe a retro one, marked by the reemergence of national bookstore chains and two prototype stores opening next month. In New York, Shakespeare & Co. is growing to three locations, laying the groundwork for its national expansion, while Indigo, Canada’s largest bookstore chain, is opening its first U.S. store in New Jersey, staking its claim before growing west. Both believe there’s big potential in general bookstore chains despite wildly different ideas about how we buy books.

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📺 MoviePass is using you to ruin the movies | YouTube

Watched MoviePass is using you to ruin the movies from YouTube
MoviePass announced a movie theater subscription plan that seemed too good to be true in 2018. As it turns out, it was. As the service bled cash, subscribers were actually the ones taking the hit, with their subscriptions being swapped, changed, or even revoked entirely. So while MoviePass isn’t the movie industry’s savior, it could illuminate a path forward for theaters to take control of their own destinies.

👓 MoviePass outage caused by company temporarily running out of cash | Business Insider

Read The MoviePass outage was caused by the company temporarily running out of money, and it borrowed $5 million in cash to turn the service back on (Business Insider)
Following a service interruption of MoviePass on Thursday, its parent company, Helios and Matheson, borrowed $5 million to bring the service back online.
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👓 Soon There Will Be Only One Blockbuster Left in the United States | The New York Times

Read Soon There Will Be Only One Blockbuster Left in the United States (nytimes.com)
The upcoming closings of two Blockbuster video stores in Alaska will leave one store in central Oregon as the last one in the United States.
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👓 Vice Media Was Built on a Bluff. What Happens When It Gets Called? | Daily Intelligencer | New York Magazine

Read Vice Media Was Built on a Bluff. What Happens When It Gets Called? by Reeves Wiedeman (Daily Intelligencer)
For almost 25 years, Shane Smith’s plan was that, by the time the suckers caught on, he’d never be stuck owning the company he co-founded.

A fantastic article.

This reminds me a lot of the recent Theranos stories and book. It’s sad how companies don’t do enough due diligence on potential investments like this. When I think about how much basic work and discussion Marcus Lemonis does for $100,000 investments, I’m appalled to hear what people are doing for multi-millions. It’s stunning that a company can get to this size and be worth nearly nothing. Using the relative size (ie number of employees) of business units like human resources and legal within a particular industry could be a reasonable guide for the internal management of a company.

This is also a good example that while investments may give a company a particular valuation, it can rarely be the actual potential present value of the company. As a result, workers who are working for near free plus stock should be paying closer attention to company internals to know that their stock portion is going to be completely worthless.

Worse, I’m always pained to hear that young people (rich or otherwise) are essentially giving away their work and sweat equity away for free to big companies that could easily pay them. Eventually the pendulum is going to swing back the other way and companies are going to need to pay more.

One of my favorite quotes from the piece:

“Shane would always say that young people are the No. 1 bullshit detector, which was annoying once you realized that the thing he mastered is getting young people to buy shit,” says a recently departed senior employee.

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👓 MoviePass is no longer too good to be true | The Verge

Read MoviePass is no longer too good to be true by Nick Statt (The Verge)
Restrictions and no longer selling its one-movie-per-day plan, are bad signs

Sad to hear this is happening. Hopefully they can hang along to get the expected economies of scale they were aiming to get before they go under. Of course, somehow the market is going to equilibrate on them.

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