📑 Blind Person-Tagging | Kicks Condor

Annotated Blind Person-Tagging by Kicks Condor (kickscondor.com)

Unlinked mentions…? What if you had an individual who was the subject of the text, but you didn’t want to notify them? You may want to include an unlinked @boffosocko, to refer to someone without summoning them. But—what if you wanted to link readers to the person without notifying them?  

I thought about this case in the not-so-recent-past and came up with the possibility of creating a “submention” similar to the idea of a subtweet. If you scroll down on that particular post, you’ll see a response from Colin Walker about actually implementing it, which he implemented as a nomention plugin for WordPress.

Of course doing things this way doesn’t necessarily prevent the person from possibly seeing it through the natural course of events, others notifying them directly (snitch-tagging), or even the use of things like refbacks, which would send them notifications anyway. And then there’s Voldemorting

📑 Bullet Journal: One Book to Rule Them All | Jamie Todd Rubin

Annotated Bullet Journal: One Book to Rule Them All by Jamie Todd Rubin (Jamie Todd Rubin)
Isaacson pointed out that more than 7,000 pages from Da Vinci’s notebooks survived to today–a stretch of 500 years. He asked how many of our tweets and Facebook posts will survive even 50 years. Paper, it turns out, is a durable medium of information storage.  

Of course one also needs to think about reach and distribution as well. His notebooks have much more reach and distribution now than they ever did in his own lifetime. Where’s the balance? Blogging about it, syndicating to social media, and then printing paper copies in annual increments?

📑 One Tool To Rule Them All | Oki Doki Digital

Annotated One Tool To Rule Them All by Marie PoulinMarie Poulin (Oki Doki Digital)
Looking at some of those bullet journal masterpieces made me wonder, how much of bullet journaling is just...productivity porn?  

How many times have I thought this myself?

My bullet journal has to be the most spartan and utilitarian book of lists ever created.

📑 Publishers build a common tech platform together | Nieman Lab

Annotated Publishers build a common tech platform together by Jonathan GillJonathan Gill (Nieman Lab)

One way to meet the many needs that most if not all publishers share would be to collaboratively develop their digital products. Specifically, they should build for interoperability. One publisher’s CMS, another’s content APIs, a third company’s data offering — they might one day all work together to allow all ships to rise and to reclaim advertising and subscription revenue from the platforms. This might allow publishers to refocus on differentiating where it truly matters for the user: in the quality of their content.  

Some of this is already afoot within the IndieWeb community with new protocols like Webmention, Micropub, WebSub, and Microsub. Journalists should know about this page on their wiki.

📑 The grand sweep of Literature and History | Indie Digital Media

Annotated The grand sweep of Literature and History by Richard MacManus (Indie Digital Media)
“I’m always genuinely happy to interact with listeners,” [Doug Metzger, Ph.D.] said, “and since some prefer social media, I use it. But my (thus far only modestly effective) strategy has been to try and produce enduring content and let it speak for itself, rather than posting ephemera on Facebook and Twitter at regular intervals.”  

I love his use of the word “ephemera” in relation to social media, particularly as he references his podcast about ancient history.

📑 What I learned at work this year | Bill Gates

Annotated What I learned at work this year by Bill Gates (gatesnotes.com)
Unfortunately, there were more cases [of polio] in 2018 than in 2017 (29 versus 22).  

The numbers and rosy picture here aren’t quite as nice as other—more detailed—reporting in the Economist recently would lead us to believe.

In some sense I do appreciate the sophistication of Bill Gates’ science communication here though as I suspect that far more Westerners are his audience and a much larger proportion of them are uninformed anti-vaxxers who might latch onto the idea of vaccine-derived polio cases as further evidence for their worldview of not vaccinating their own children and thereby increasing heath risk in the United States.

Graph of Polio cases by year since 2000 as reported by The Economist

📑 What I learned at work this year | Bill Gates

Annotated What I learned at work this year by Bill Gates (gatesnotes)
So has Warren Buffett, who says his measure of success is, “Do the people you care about love you back?”  

📑 India’s Tighter E-Commerce Rules Frustrate Amazon and Walmart Plans | Wall Street Journal

Annotated India’s Tighter E-Commerce Rules Frustrate Amazon and Walmart Plans by Newley Purnell and Corinne Abrams (Wall Street Journal)
With Alphabet Inc.’s Google, and Facebook Inc. and its WhatsApp messaging service used by hundreds of millions of Indians, India is examining methods China has used to protect domestic startups and take control of citizens’ data.  

Governments owning citizens’ data directly?? Why not have the government empower citizens to own their own data?

📑 #LoveBombs for Thimble: Saying Goodbye to Teacher, Mentor, Friend | INTERTEXTrEVOLUTION

Annotated #LoveBombs for Thimble: Saying Goodbye to Teacher, Mentor, Friend by J. Gregroy McVerry (jgmac1106homepage.glitch.me)
Everything that gets launched gets shuttered.  

True of almost everything in life.

📑 Top 5 Technology Trends of 2018 | Richard MacManus

Annotated Top 5 Technology Trends of 2018 by Richard MacManus (Richard MacManus)
I adopted a ‘horses for courses’ approach to keep it in check. I used Facebook primarily to keep in touch with family and real-world friends, I used Twitter for tech discussions and networking, I used LinkedIn sparingly, and I dropped any social media that didn’t fulfill a specific function for me.  

📑 Best Answer to “Sell Me This Pen” I Have Ever Seen | LinkedIn

Annotated Best Answer to “Sell Me This Pen” I Have Ever Seen by Girish AmanapuGirish Amanapu (LinkedIn Pulse)

Here’s the simple sales framework I used to answer “sell me this pen”. Memorize it for yourself.

  1. Find out how they last used a pen (gather info)
  2. Emphasize the importance of the activity they last used a pen (respond to info)
  3. Sell something bigger than a pen, like a state of mind (deliver info)
  4. Ask for the buy (closing)
  

📑 How The Wall Street Journal is preparing its journalists to detect deepfakes | Nieman Lab

Annotated How The Wall Street Journal is preparing its journalists to detect deepfakes (Nieman Lab)
As deepfakes make their way into social media, their spread will likely follow the same pattern as other fake news stories. In a MIT study investigating the diffusion of false content on Twitter published between 2006 and 2017, researchers found that “falsehood diffused significantly farther, faster, deeper, and more broadly than truth in all categories of information.” False stories were 70 percent more likely to be retweeted than the truth and reached 1,500 people six times more quickly than accurate articles.  

This sort of research should make it easier to find and stamp out from the social media side of things. We need regulations to actually make it happen however.

📑 ‘Mr. President, That’s a Good One’: Congressman Replies to Trump’s Vulgar Tweet | New York Times

Annotated ‘Mr. President, That’s a Good One’: Congressman Replies to Trump’s Vulgar Tweet (New York Times)
“unpresidented” for “unprecedented,”  

Unpresidented is a great word for the Trump administration. Reminds me a bit of Jonathan Last’s recent use of the phrase “Vaporware Presidency”.

📑 ‘Mr. President, That’s a Good One’: Congressman Replies to Trump’s Vulgar Tweet | New York Times

Annotated ‘Mr. President, That’s a Good One’: Congressman Replies to Trump’s Vulgar Tweet (New York Times)
President Trump has a proclivity for tweeting, typos and trenchant nicknames.  

Trenchant is such a good word that we don’t see very often. I’m both happy and sad at its use here.

📑 How to Talk to People, According to Terry Gross | New York Times

Annotated How to Talk to People, According to Terry Gross (New York Times)
Politicians, she believes, “owe us an answer,” and so she, in her own very Terry Gross way will “keep asking and re-asking and asking, and maybe I’ll ask it in separate ways, and maybe I’ll point out that they haven’t yet answered the question.”