Bookmarked 'Country is the greatest teacher': Aboriginal language lessons move out of the classroom (abc.net.au)
Words painstakingly recorded for decades to revive the once-banned language of the NSW south coast are being spoken again on country that breathes life into them.
Lynne Kelly in Aboriginal education and The Memory Code ()
Bookmarked Visual and auditory brain areas share a representational structure that supports emotion perception by Beau Sievers, Carolyn Parkinson, Peter J. Kohler, James M. Hughes, Sergey V. Fogelson, Thalia Wheatley (Current Biology)
Emotionally expressive music and dance occur together across the world. This may be because features shared across the senses are represented the same way even in different sensory brain areas, putting music and movement in directly comparable terms. These shared representations may arise from a general need to identify environmentally relevant combinations of sensory features, particularly those that communicate emotion. To test the hypothesis that visual and auditory brain areas share a representational structure, we created music and animation stimuli with crossmodally matched features expressing a range of emotions. Participants confirmed that each emotion corresponded to a set of features shared across music and movement. A subset of participants viewed both music and animation during brain scanning, revealing that representations in auditory and visual brain areas were similar to one another. This shared representation captured not only simple stimulus features but also combinations of features associated with emotion judgments. The posterior superior temporal cortex represented both music and movement using this same structure, suggesting supramodal abstraction of sensory content. Further exploratory analysis revealed that early visual cortex used this shared representational structure even when stimuli were presented auditorily. We propose that crossmodally shared representations support mutually reinforcing dynamics across auditory and visual brain areas, facilitating crossmodal comparison. These shared representations may help explain why emotions are so readily perceived and why some dynamic emotional expressions can generalize across cultural contexts.
This portends some interesting results with relation to mnemonics and particularly songlines and indigenous peoples’ practices which integrate song, movement, and emotion.

Preprint: https://www.biorxiv.org/content/10.1101/254961v4

Beau Sievers in “New work published today in Current Biology Visual and auditory brain areas share a representational structure that supports emotion perception With @ThaliaWheatley @k_v_n_l @parkinsoncm @sergeyfogelson (thread after coffee!) https://t.co/AURqH9kNLb https://t.co/ro4o4oEwk5” / Twitter ()

Bookmarked Sheet-posting (sheet-posting.me)
Turn a Google Sheets spreadsheet into a blog page and RSS feed
This reminds me of the sort of thing that @JohnStewartPhD or someone from the space might do: Turn a Google Sheet into a website.

Kevin Marks in #indieweb 2021-09-06 ()

Bookmarked Media and the Mind: Art, Science and Notebooks as Paper Machines, 1700-1830 by Matthew Daniel EddyMatthew Daniel Eddy (University of Chicago Press)
I can’t wait to read Media and the Mind: Art, Science and Notebooks as Paper Machines, 1700-1830 (University of Chicago Press, 2022)!

I see some bits on annotation hiding in here that may be of interest to Remi Kalir and Antero Garcia.

Matthew Daniel Eddy, if you need some additional eyeballs on it prior to publication, I’m happy to mark it up in exchange for the early look.
Bookmarked Tending the Digital Commons by Alan JacobsAlan Jacobs (The Hedgehog Review | Spring 2018: The Human and the Digital)
The complexities of social media ought to prompt deep reflection on what we all owe to the future, and how we might discharge this debt.
This fantastic essay touches on so many things related to IndieWeb and A Domain of One’s Own. We often talk about the “why” of these movements, but Alan Jacobs provides some underlying ethics as well.

For those who don’t have a subscription, Alan has kindly and pleasantly provided a samizdat version on his site in .pdf format.

Bookmarked An Excerpt From The Left Hand of Darkness by Ursula K. Le Guin (Penguin)
Science fiction is often described, and even defined, as extrapolative. The science fiction writer is supposed to take a trend or phenomenon of the here-and-now, purify and intensify it for dramatic effect, and extend it into the future. “If this goes on, this is what will happen.” A prediction is made. Method and results much resemble those of a scientist who feeds large doses of a purified and concentrated food additive to mice, in order to predict what may happen to people who eat it in small quantities for a long time. The outcome seems almost inevitably to be cancer. So does the outcome of extrapolation. Strictly extrapolative works of science fiction generally arrive about where the Club of Rome arrives: somewhere between the gradual extinction of human liberty and the total extinction of terrestrial life.
Suggested Annotated Reading from the I Annotate 2021 Keynote: Courtney McClellan
Bookmarked Citizen DJ (citizen-dj.labs.loc.gov)
Make music using the free-to-use audio and video materials from the Library of Congress This is a project by Brian Foo as part of the 2020 Innovator in Residence Program at the Library of Congress.
Some interesting resources for music, audio, and video from the Library of Congress mentioned early this morning at IAnno21.
Bookmarked 7 Things You Should Know About Collaborative Annotation (library.educause.edu)
Collaborative annotation tools expand the concept of social bookmarking by allowing users not only to share bookmarks but also to digitally annotate w
Interesting looking article that was referenced at I Annotate 2021 today.
Bookmarked #ianno19 Keynote: The Simple Secret of the Note in Us All by Gardner Campbell by Hypothes.isHypothes.is (YouTube)

Gardner Campbell of Virginia Commonwealth University keynotes the seventh annual I Annotate gathering in Washington DC, focused on the theme Annotation Unleashed: The Web at 30. Note well. Take note. Make a note. Leave a mark. Annotation, learning, teaching, and human flourishing are all deeply intertwingled. I’ll explore some of these connections, with illustrations from my use of annotation in the classroom as well as in my work with Doug Engelbart’s 1962 research report and manifesto, Augmenting Human Intellect: A Conceptual Framework. Along the way, I’ll consider the central question Shoshana Zuboff poses in The Age of Surveillance Capitalism: “Can the digital future be our home?” Or will it be a place of exile? View Gardner's slides: https://drive.google.com/open?id=1C63... Explore #ianno19: https://iannotate.org/2019/

Thank you to Gardner himself for working to create this final edited version of his presentation!

Referenced by Paul Schacht (English/Digital Learning, SUNY Geneseo) in the I Annotate 2021 Panel: Digital Literacies panel
Bookmarked AnnotatED Bibliography (Hypothes.is)

We invite you use this collaborative bibliography on annotation, curated by members of AnnotatED, the community for annotation in education that includes educators, researchers, and technologists from organizations that engage deeply with collaborative annotation as a transformative practice in teaching and learning.

You can also visit a filtered view of the full bibliography that includes only scholarship specifically related to Hypothesis and the full bibliography directly in Zotero. Contact us to make suggestions or join as a contributor.