Replied to a tweet by James BernardJames Bernard (Twitter)
James, I’ve been watching a few people use public-facing TiddlyWikis for “hyperchat“. One of them also has it set up with Webmention functionality so that other sites can send it notifications (though they’re not yet displaying them). To me this looks like the beginning of a different sort of social network and online communication.

I ran across an example yesterday of someone using a private local TiddlyWiki as a static site web generator, which is quite different from people hosting them directly on web servers.

I’m interested in off-label use cases for wikis (particularly in the vein of commonplace books), so do let us know when your article comes out.

Replied to Questions (Reclaim Hosting Community)
Everyone has questions and most likely someone here has an answer for you. Whether it be about hosting, domains, or anything else you need help with, this is the place to ask.
I’ve been looking closer at wikis, online commonplace books, and similar personal/work/lab/research notebooks recently and have come across TiddlyWiki as a useful, simple, but very flexible possibility.

While most of its ecosystem revolves around methods for running the program locally (and often privately) or in Google or Dropbox storage, I’ve come across a growing number of people hosting their instances on their own servers and using them publicly as a melange of personal websites, blogs, and wikis.

Has anyone tried hosting one (particularly the newer TW5) through Reclaim before? Of the many methods, I’m curious which may be the easiest/simplest from a set up perspective?

Here are some interesting examples I’ve come across:
* “A Thesis Notebook” by Alberto Molina
* PESpot Lesson Planner by Patrick Detzner (this one seems to be heavily modified)
* sphygm.us

Small progress in my wiki explorations and a fix to my MediaWiki administrative user email address

I’d looking into maintaining a wiki a while back and have recently been determined to get back to it. As a result, I’ve been looking at TiddlyWiki since that’s what some of Kicks Condor‘s group has been using. (Yep, I’ve still got that tab opened and am tinkering away slowly on the ideas–but mostly the technology.)

I’ve been having some issues in self-hosting a TiddlyWiki the way I’d like to. If anyone has any clear cut documentation on how to host a TiddlyWiki on one’s own domain name, I’d appreciate it. The documentation doesn’t seem as clear as I would expect (or perhaps more likely my server is having issues propagating/connecting?). If anything it’s muddled by the fact that they can seemingly be hosted in dozens of places one might not otherwise expect. My primary reservation is that it looks to me like they’re designed as single user instances, so I’m not exactly sure how Kicks et al. are effectuating their hyperconversations. Part of my issue is my mental model of some of the wikis involved in addition to the busy-ness of the sites’ themes, not to mention some of the non-standard conversational style on some. (I’ll get there eventually.)

I’ve also been using the IndieWeb’s MediaWiki for several years, so I’ve become much better at how it works as well as the ins-and-outs of the markup and how to do some slightly more advanced things using it. I’d set one up nearly a year ago this month and used it sporadically at best.

One of the bigger problems with my MediaWiki install was that somehow I wasn’t able to log into the primary account to do some of the necessary administrative functions. Today I got fed up with being hampered a bit and went spelunking into my install to see where things went wrong, suspecting that it was a one button install issue.

After digging through some documentation, I dug into the mySQL database and found a daunting looking [Blob] in the user_email field. Why couldn’t it be an easy-to-edit field? I not knowing anything better to do, I downloaded it, opened it up in my text editor, and discovered that I’d managed to leave a letter out of my own name in the email address! No wonder it wouldn’t work and the system wouldn’t let me reset my email address or password. A quick text edit later, the email was fixed, I uploaded the (now less intimidating) [Blob], and did a reset of the password in the admin interface, and we’re back in business! I’m always glad not to have borked the entire database and site.

If nothing else, it’ll help me in my explorations. Onward.

Bookmarked TiddlyWiki — a non-linear personal web notebook (tiddlywiki.com)

Have you ever had the feeling that your head is not quite big enough to hold everything you need to remember?

Welcome to TiddlyWiki, a unique non-linear notebook for capturingorganising and sharing complex information.

Use it to keep your to-do list, to plan an essay or novel, or to organise your wedding. Record every thought that crosses your brain, or build a flexible and responsive website.

Unlike conventional online services, TiddlyWiki lets you choose where to keep your data, guaranteeing that in the decades to come you will still be able to use the notes you take today.

Bookmarked Neil's Noodlemaps by Neil Mather (commonplace.doubleloop.net)

Welcome! This is my digital commonplace book. I started it (in this format) in October 2019.

It is a companion to my blog. They are the Garden and the Stream.

Please feel free to click around here and explore. Don't expect too much in the way coherence or permanence… it is a lot of half-baked ideas, badly organised. The very purpose is for snippets to percolate and morph and evolve over time, and it's possible (quite likely) that pages will move around.

That said, I make it public in the interest of info-sharing, and occassionally it is quite useful to have a public place to refer someone to an idea-in-progress of mine.

Some more info on the whats and the whys.

According to Neil, this is using “emacs with Org mode and Org-roam and publishing it as static HTML from org-mode. My holy grail would be something like TiddlyWiki but in emacs.”

I’ll have to take a look at this sort of set up while I’m looking at wikis. I’m sort of partial to TiddlyWiki myself so far.

Listened to Microcast #082 – Nodenoggin by Doug Belshaw from Thought Schrapnel

This week, I’ve been delighted to be able to catch up with Adam Procter, academic, games designer, open advocate, and long-time supporter of Thought Shrapnel.

We discussed everything from the IndieWeb to his PhD project, with relevant links below!

Show notes

Read 2020/Austin/fromflowtostock (indieweb.org)
From Flow to Stock was a session at IndieWebCamp Austin 2020.
I’d love to see the video for this conversation once posted. The notes give a reasonable idea, but there’s a lot of discussion of silos going on here. I’m curious how those who attended might begin to own some of the ideas on their own websites in the future.

I see a lot of overlap with the ideas of commonplace books with what is going on here. Looking at the list of participants I’m not seeing any that I think might actually have both “stock” and “flow” on their personal websites yet. I feel like I’m getting ever closer to having them on mine.

Read Building a personal knowledge base by Kirill Maltsev (kirillmaltsev.net)
I try to unload all information that has any meaning to me from my brain to external storage because I don’t like to rely on my memory nor do I trust it. In this blog post, I’m going to describe my current approach of working with a personal knowledge base.
He’s got a solid listing of tools here, many I’ve either tried or am currently using myself. Looks like he hasn’t come across Roam yet which I like for it’s ability to change tags across many linked pages. I wish other tools had that one killer feature.
Read Webmentions work log 20200115 by Jeremy Felt (jeremyfelt.com)
Tonight is Pullman’s first Homebrew Website Club and I’m going to use the allocated hacking time to figure out what might be misfiring in the Webmention plugin’s always approve feature. Side note: It feels weird typing “Webmention” rather than “webmention”. I think I’m going to use t...
Read I ❤ Blogs And Maybe You Should Too. by Luis Gabriel Santiago AlvaradoLuis Gabriel Santiago Alvarado (gabz.me)
I have been reading ‘Blogs’ for as long as I have been “surfing” the web (it’s that a term I can still use?), even if at the time I wasn’t aware of what I was reading was a blog. To me was probably just another website. Then I started to get more serious about it and read more of some pe...
Read Hyperchatting by Jack BatyJack Baty (baty.blog)
People seem very focused on technological solutions to online communication (ActivityPub, Indieweb, this absurd BlueSky idea), but the hyperconversation approach is trying to prove that the problem is a human problem. If you read and listen to each other and try to respond thoughtfully and carefully - and try to
Read TiddlyWiki and Roam and my Daily Notes by Jack Baty (baty.blog)
A few notes about differences between TiddlyWiki and Roam related to my daily note taking process. In October, 2018, I created a wiki at rudimentarylathe.org using the wonderful TiddlyWiki. Since then I've written just shy of 1,000 "tiddlers" there and it's been a totally pleasant experience. The original
Read 6 tips for low-cost academic blogging by Matt Might (matt.might.net)

The secret to low-cost academic blogging is to make blogging a natural byproduct of all the things that academics already do.

  • Doing an interesting lecture? Put your lecture notes in a blog post.
  • Writing a detailed email reply? "Reply to public" with a blog post.
  • Answering the same question a second time? Put it in a blog post.
  • Writing interesting code? Comment a snippet into a post.
  • Doing something geeky at home? Blog about what you learned.
Replied to a tweet by Dr. Ryan StraightDr. Ryan Straight (Twitter)
What a great prompt! Here are a few interesting off-label use cases I’ve used, imagined, or seen in the wild:

Greg McVerry, Ian O’Byrne, and I have integrated Hypothes.is into our digital/online commonplace books in different ways. Greg’s are embedded at https://jgregorymcverry.com/annotations, Ian discusses his process on his site, while mine show up as annotation or highlight posts.

I’ve not published the full idea yet, but I’ve spent some time contemplating using Hypothes.is as a blogging platform/CMS. It might require a bit of flexibility, but it generally has reasonable support for:

  • Writing posts with a reasonably full-featured text editor and the ability to edit and delete posts later;
  • HTML and markdown support;
  • Public and private posting as well as sharing content with other private groups;
  • The ability to reply to other websites;
  • The ability for others to comment on your posts natively;
  • A robust tagging functionality;
  • The ability to socially bookmark web pages (blank page notes);
  • An RSS feed;
  • The ability to share posts to other social platforms including meta data for Twitter cards;
  • Naturally, it’s very easy to use for writing short notes, creating highlights and annotations, and keeping track of what you’ve read;
  • It has a pseudo-social media functionality in that your public posts appear on a global timeline where people can read and interact with them.
  • It’s also opensource, so you can self-host, modify it, or add new features.

I have been personally using Hypothes.is to follow the public feed, several tag feeds, and several friends’ specific feeds as a discovery tool for finding interesting content to read.

And a final off-label use case that could be compelling, but which could have some better UI and integration would be to use Hypothes.is as an embeddable commenting system for one’s own website. It has in-line commenting in much the same way that Medium does, but the entire thing could likely be embedded into a comment section under a traditional blog post and be used in much the same way people use Disqus on blogs. I’ll note that in practice, I find Hypothes.is far faster than Disqus ever was. I’ve yet to see anyone offloading the commenting functionality of their blog this way, but I’d be willing to bet dollars to donuts that someone could hack it together as a simple iframe or via the API pretty quickly and with solid results.

And naturally I’m missing many, potentially including some I’ve thought about before. Maybe worth checking the old Hypothes.is tag in my digital notebook?

If people have others, I’m enamored to hear them.