Reply to Watched E-learning 3.0 Graph #el30 by Greg McVerry

Replied to Watched E-learning 3.0 Graph #el30 by Greg McVerryGreg McVerry (quickthoughts.jgregorymcverry.com)
Thinking about knowledge as a graph. #el30 In social analysis strength of connection represents authority? Is same true of knowledge? The more connections the truthier something is. 

Interesting. I got a refback from this post to my WordPress and IndieWeb presentation. Did you have a link to it on the page originally Greg and then delete it, or is it a spurious glitch? Very curious…

For a more on-topic comment, have you read Richard Dawkins‘ original conception of the neologism “meme” in his book The Selfish Gene (Oxford, 1976)? He’s got some interesting early examples that touch on connections and spread of information.

I’ve also recently finished reading Linked: The New Science of Networks by Albert-László Barabási which also has some interesting pieces and underlying theory (without all the heavy math) which are broadly applicable to some of these questions.

 

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Reply to Greg McVerry about academic samizdat pre-print server

Replied to a post by Greg McVerryGreg McVerry (quickthoughts.jgregorymcverry.com)
Then we also make a 12/31/2019 to have published first issue of a academic samizdat POSSE Journal about blogging research from any discipline. I wanna bring back some lightning talks like BlogCon 2003-2006., but first we do the journal.

I like that idea. Perhaps between the models for news.IndieWeb.org and Kicks Condor’s indiweb.xyz, we could create a syndicatable (pre-print) academic journal that allows sorting by top level academic disciplines.

I don’t recall though, are either of them open source, or do we need to re-build by hand?

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👓 Peggy McIntosh | Wikipedia

Read Peggy McIntosh (Wikipedia)
Peggy McIntosh (born November 7, 1934) is an American feminist, anti-racism activist, scholar, speaker, and Senior Research Associate of the Wellesley Centers for Women. She is the founder of the National SEED Project on Inclusive Curriculum (Seeking Educational Equity and Diversity). She and Emily Style co-directed SEED for its first twenty-five years. She has written on curricular revision, feelings of fraudulence, and professional development of teachers. In 1988, she published the article "White Privilege and Male Privilege: A Personal Account of Coming to See Correspondences Through Work in Women’s Studies".[2] This analysis, and its shorter version, "White Privilege: Unpacking the Invisible Knapsack" (1989), pioneered putting the dimension of privilege into discussions of power, gender, race, class and sexuality in the United States. Both papers rely on personal examples of unearned advantage that McIntosh says she experienced in her lifetime, especially from 1970 to 1988. McIntosh encourages individuals to reflect on and recognize their own unearned advantages and disadvantages as parts of immense and overlapping systems of power. She has been criticized for concealing her considerable, personal class privilege and displacing it onto the collective category of race.

Definitely want to read her Invisible Knapsack work.

Interesting mention:

With Dr. Nancy Hill, McIntosh co-founded the Rocky Mountain Women’s Institute, which, for thirty-five years, annually gave “money and a room of one’s own” to ten women who were not supported by other institutions and were working on projects in the arts and many other fields.

Another example of Virginia Woolf’s idea being put into practice in the wild. (I added a link to the Wikipedia page to make it more obvious.)

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👓 Twenty things I wish I’d known when I started my PhD | Nature

Read Twenty things I wish I’d known when I started my PhD by Lucy A. Taylor (Nature)
Recent PhD graduate Lucy A. Taylor shares the advice she and her colleagues wish they had received.
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Reply to Taylor Jadin about planet functionality for education

Replied to a tweet by Taylor JadinTaylor Jadin (Twitter)
It was a pretty productive Open Domains Lab for me. Got my sort "funnel" site set somewhat set up using FeedWordpress. http://taylor.jadin.me/

I’m curious to hear your thoughts after using it. It sounds like it has a lot of functionality overlap with Press Forward (for WordPress). Planet-like functionality is commonly requested in the education and technology space. Are there others? Stephen DownesgRSShopper perhaps?

 

 

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🎧 The Daily: The Trump Voters We Don’t Talk About | New York Times

Listened to The Daily: The Trump Voters We Don’t Talk About by Michael Barbaro from New York Times

New data offers a more nuanced look at this group beyond “white men without a college degree.”

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Reply to Weekend Reading – Rediscovering Blogging Edition by Lee Skallerup Bessette

Replied to Weekend Reading – Rediscovering Blogging Edition by Lee Skallerup BessetteLee Skallerup Bessette (ProfHacker - The Chronicle of Higher Education)
Blogs are back! At least, they seem to be making a resurgence as we try to disentangle ourselves from the predatory social media platforms that took all the words many of us used to write on blogs. I’ll admit, I started my own tinyletter in part because I wanted to find an audience again that was a little more personal that what gets lost in the algorithmic facebook feed and the firehose that is Twitter. My blog (which is my domain) is kind of an experiment in long-form writing now. I’m working at another Domains school, so we are thinking about how students are using their domains, owning their own data, and writing publicly.

Lee (t), thanks for the mention in Profhacker. I’ve only just seen it thanks to an old Web ~0.4 technology called Refback. You’ve done a great job of calling out the recent blogging renaissance, some of which is being powered by the Domain of One’s Own and the IndieWeb movements.

There are a bunch of us who are happy to help out anyone who’d like to jump in with both feet.

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👓 Weekend Reading – Rediscovering Blogging Edition | ProfHacker – The Chronicle of Higher Education

Read Weekend Reading – Rediscovering Blogging Edition by Lee Skallerup Bessette (ProfHacker - The Chronicle of Higher Education)
Blogs are back! At least, they seem to be making a resurgence as we try to disentangle ourselves from the predatory social media platforms that took all the words many of us used to write on blogs. I’ll admit, I started my own tinyletter in part because I wanted to find an audience again that was a little more personal that what gets lost in the algorithmic facebook feed and the firehose that is Twitter. My blog (which is my domain) is kind of an experiment in long-form writing now. I’m working at another Domains school, so we are thinking about how students are using their domains, owning their own data, and writing publicly.
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📅 RSVP to DTLA Mini Maker Faire 2018

RSVPed Attending DTLA Mini Maker Faire 2018

DESCRIPTION

DTLA Mini Maker Faire is back for the third time! Los Angeles is again joining a global network of Maker Faires to celebrate invention, creativity, craftsmanship, science, and the Do-It-Yourself (DIY) and Do-It-Together (DIT) culture with more diverse representations of all of the kinds of making in Los Angeles and beyond!

Proudly hosted by the Los Angeles Public Library, the DTLA Mini Maker Faire will take place at the gorgeous and historic Central Library in downtown Los Angeles (otherwise known as DTLA).

Questions? Want to talk to an organizer? Interested in becoming a sponsor? Visit our Contact page.

FAQs

Attendance is Free! Why sign up for a ticket?

Due to the limited space at the Central Library, participants are strongly recommended to register for a ticket. In addition, signing up for a ticket will help us better plan our exhibits and interactive displays so that we will have enough materials for everyone to take part and enjoy.

And there's more! All registered attendees will receive a DTLA Maker Faire sticker at check-in that will be accepted as a discount voucher at various nearby eateries. A complete list of participating stores will be provided at check-in. Also, all registered participants will be automatically entered to win a really cool prize tote at check-in. Winner will be notified via email.

Do I need to bring my ticket with me?

Yes, please bring your printed ticket or have your confirmation QR code ready on your smart device for faster check-in at the event entry.

When will DTLA Mini Maker Faire be open to the public?

It will be on Saturday, December 1, 2018, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. PST

More information at dtla.makerfaire.com.

Where can I park?

You may park in the commercial parking garage located at 524 South Flower Street.

Please enter and exit the Westlawn parking garage from Flower Street entrance; it's the first driveway, with a ramp going down. With the anticipated traffic congestion and several street closures and detours due to the construction work in the vicinity, please plan your travel time and route accordingly and allow yourself extra time to reach your destination.

When entering the garage after 9:30 a.m. and exiting by 5:30 p.m., parking is $1.00 flat rate with LAPL library card validation. To obtain a validation, you must show your Los Angeles Public Library library card at the Information Desk on the first floor. If you do not have a LAPL library card, you may apply for one on the day of the event. It's free to get a library card.

Where is the handicap parking located?

The Central Library is fully accessible to the disabled throughout the building. Flower and Fifth Street entrances have ramps.

There are two options for handicapped parking:

  1. There are two handicapped parking spaces with no meters or charge located on the south side of Fifth Street close to the Fifth Street entrance to the building for vehicles with a disabled placard.
  2. The Westlawn commercial parking lot at 524 S. Flower Street has the disabled parking symbol on its sign. The spaces are available immediately to the right as you enter the garage.

Is public transportation available?

The Metro Blue Line and Metro Red Line both have stops near Central Library. Most buses which come downtown stop near the Central Library. Check the MTA website for rates, routes, and schedules. Please note that due to the ongoing Metro Regional Connector Transit Project, Metro Rail and Bus service may be impacted.

For real-time rail and bus service information, please click here or call 323.GO.METRO

Will you have bike parking?

Yes, the Central Library has 12 U-bike racks in front of the 5th Street entrance, 4 U-bike racks on Hope Street near the library's Hope Street entrance, and there is a single-sided grid bike rack by the staircase next to the Library's Flower Street entrance.

Can I volunteer at the Mini Maker Faire?

Yes! Please contact the Volunteer Engagement Office at volunteer@lapl.orgor call (213) 228-7490.

What if it rains?

The show will go on! Only a portion of the exhibits will be outdoor. Bring rain gear to keep you dry when walking outdoors. We will have many indoor exhibits to keep the family dry.

What can I expect?

To have a fantastic time! You'll be surprised, intrigued, and inspired with every corner that you turn.

DTLA Mini Maker Faire is independently organized and operated under license from Maker Media, Inc.

I understand that by registering here, Maker Media may provide me with updates and information about Maker Faires, other events, and products of interest to the maker community. I understand that I may opt out of these communications at any time. Maker Media Privacy Policy

👓 Civix Releases New Online Media Literacy Videos | Hapgood

Replied to Civix Releases New Online Media Literacy Videos by Mike Caulfield (Hapgood)
I worked with Civix, a Canadian non-profit, to do a series of videos showing students basic web techniques for source verification and contextualization. I had boiled it down to four scripts runnin…

As I read this and tinker around a bit with some of the resources, including one for canadafactcheck.ca mentioned within one of the videos and add the “Wikipedia” to the Omnibar or try the “-site:” trick, the results there aren’t very solid themselves. Similarly a search for NewsWise.ca is rough because there are dozens of similar products with the same name which makes me think about the phrase “Doctor heal thyself.”

On the idea of the “-site:xyz.com” trick, perhaps one could create a browser extension or a bookmarklet that would use javascript to take the URL in the browser bar and massage it to return the requisite string and then execute the appropriate search so that with a simple click of a button, anyone can “remember” how to do it?

Similarly with searching for the root URLs of particular outlets by clipping off the longer paths of URLs one could use a browser bookmarklet to accomplish this with a simple click and save the seconds involved with highlighting and pasting? The more dead simple and quicker it can be, the better off we are. I’ve documented a browser bookmarklet on my site that trims news article URLs down to the base URL: https://boffosocko.com/2017/03/27/to-amp-or-not-to-amp-that-is-the-question/

As an example of this type of functionality, albiet probably with a lot more programming and manual work, Brill’s company NewsGuard has developed a Chrome browser extension that is meant to provide visual indicators on pages and in search for levels of fact checking: https://chrome.google.com/webstore/detail/newsguard/hcgajcpgaalgpeholhdooeddllhedegi?hl=en

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👓 How Students Engage with News: Five Takeaways for Educators, Journalists, and Librarians | Project Information Literacy Research Institute

Read How Students Engage with News: Five Takeaways for Educators, Journalists, and Librarians [.pdf] by Alison J. Head, John Wihbey, P. Takis Metaxas, Margy MacMillan, and Dan Cohen (Project Information Literacy Research Institute)
Abstract: The News Study research report presents findings about how a sample of U.S. college students gather information and engage with news in the digital age. Results are included from an online survey of 5,844 respondents and telephone interviews with 37 participants from 11 U.S. colleges and universities selected for their regional, demographic, and red/blue state diversity. A computational analysis was conducted using Twitter data associated with the survey respondents and a Twitter panel of 135,891 college-age people. Six recommendations are included for educators, journalists, and librarians working to make students effective news consumers. To explore the implications of this study’s findings, concise commentaries from leading thinkers in education, libraries, media research, and journalism are included.

A great little paper about how teens and college students are finding, reading, sharing, and generally interacting with news. There’s some nice overlap here on both the topics of journalism and education which I find completely fascinating. In general, however, I think in a few places students are mis-reporting their general uses, so I’m glad a portion of the paper actually looks at data from Twitter in the wild to see what real world use cases actually are.

Perhaps there are some interesting segments and even references relevant to the topics of education and IndieWeb for Greg McVerry‘s recent project?

As I read this, I can’t help but think of some things I’ve seen Michael Caulfield writing about news and social media over the past several months. As I look, I notice that he’s already read and written a bit about a press release for this particular paper. I’ll have to take a look at his take on it tomorrow. I’m particularly interested in any insights he’s got on lateral reading and fake news above and beyond his prior thoughts.

Perhaps I missed it hiding in there reading so late at night, but another potentially good source for this paper’s recommended section would be Caulfield’s book Web Literacy for Student Fact-Checkers.

Highlights, Quotes, Annotations, & Marginalia

The purpose of this study was to better understand the preferences, practices, and motivations of young news consumers, while focusing on what students actually do, rather than what they do not do.  

October 22, 2018 at 08:28PM

YouTube (54%), Instagram (51%) or Snapchat (55%)  

I’m curious to know which sources in particular they’re using on these platforms. Snapchat was growing news sources a year ago, but I’ve heard those sources are declining. What is the general quality of these sources?

For example, getting news from television can range from PBS News Hour and cable news networks (more traditional sources) to comedy shows like Stephen Colbert and The Daily Show with Trevor Noah which have some underlying news in the comedy, but are far from traditional sources.
October 22, 2018 at 08:35PM

Some students (28%) received news from podcasts in the preceding week.  

October 22, 2018 at 08:38PM

news is stressful and has little impact on the day-to-day routines —use it for class assignments, avoid it otherwise.” While a few students like this one practiced news abstinence, such students were rare.  

This sounds a bit like my college experience, though I didn’t avoid it because of stressful news (and there wasn’t social media yet). I generally missed it because I didn’t subscribe directly to publications or watch much television. Most of my news consumption was the local college newspaper.
October 22, 2018 at 08:46PM

But on the Web, stories of all kinds can show up anywhere and information and news are all mixed together. Light features rotate through prominent spots on the “page” with the same weight as breaking news, sports coverage, and investigative pieces, even on mainstream news sites. Advertorial “features” and opinion pieces are not always clearly identified in digitalspaces.  

This difference is one of the things I miss about reading a particular newspaper and experiencing the outlet’s particular curation of their own stories. Perhaps I should spend more time looking at the “front page” of various news sites?
October 22, 2018 at 08:57PM

Some (36%) said they agreed that the threat of “‘fake news’ had made them distrust the credibility of any news.” Almost half (45%) lacked confidence with discerning “real news” from “fake news,” and only 14% said they were “very confident” that they could detect “fake news.”  

These numbers are insane!
October 22, 2018 at 09:04PM

As a matter of recourse, some students in the study “read the news laterally,” meaning they used sources elsewhere on the Internet to compare versions of a story in an attempt to verify its facts, bias, and ultimately, its credibility.25  

This reminds me how much I miss the old daily analysis that Slate use to do for the day’s top news stories in various outlets in their Today’s Papers segment.
October 22, 2018 at 09:15PM

Some respondents, though not all, did evaluate the veracity of news they shared on social media. More (62%) said they checked to see how current an item was, while 59% read the complete story before sharing and 57% checked the URL to see where a story originated (Figure 7). Fewer read comments about a post (55%) or looked to see how many times an item was tweeted or shared (39%).  

I’m not sure I believe these self-reported numbers at all. 59% read the complete story before sharing?! 57% checked the URL? I’ll bet that not that many could probably define what a URL is.
October 22, 2018 at 10:00PM

information diet  

October 22, 2018 at 11:02PM

At the tactical level, there are likely many small things that could be tested with younger audiences to help them better orient themselves to the crowded news landscape. For example, some news organizations are more clearly identifying different types of content such as editorials, features, and backgrounders/news analysis.57More consistent and more obvious use of these typological tags would help all news consumers, not just youth, and could also travel with content as itis posted and shared in social media. News organizations should engage more actively with younger audiences to see what might be helpful.  

October 22, 2018 at 11:37PM

When news began moving into the first digital spaces in the early 1990s, pro-Web journalists touted the possibilities of hypertext links that would give news consumers the context they needed. Within a couple of years, hypertext links slowly began to disappear from many news stories. Today, hypertext links are all but gone from most mainstream news stories.  

October 22, 2018 at 11:38PM

“Solutions journalism’ is another promising trend that answers some of the respondents’ sense of helplessness in the face of the barrage of crisis coverage.62  

October 22, 2018 at 11:40PM

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🔖 How Students Engage With News: Five Takeaways for Educators, Journalists, and Librarians | Project Information Literacy Research Institute

Bookmarked How Students Engage With News: Five Takeaways for Educators, Journalists, and Librarians by Alison J. Head, John Wihbey, P. Takis Metaxas, Margy MacMillan, and Dan Cohen (Project Information Literacy Research Institute)

Abstract: The News Study research report presents findings about how a sample of U.S. college students gather information and engage with news in the digital age. Results are included from an online survey of 5,844 respondents and telephone interviews with 37 participants from 11 U.S. colleges and universities selected for their regional, demographic, and red/blue state diversity. A computational analysis was conducted using Twitter data associated with the survey respondents and a Twitter panel of 135,891 college-age people. Six recommendations are included for educators, journalists, and librarians working to make students effective news consumers. To explore the implications of this study’s findings, concise commentaries from leading thinkers in education, libraries, media research, and journalism are included.

hat tip: Dan Cohen

telephone interviews with 37 participants  

I have to wonder at telephone samples of this age group given the propensity of youth to not communicate via voice phone.
October 22, 2018 at 08:15PM

Major Findings (2:35 minutes)  

I’m quite taken with the variety of means this study is using to communicate its findings. There are blogposts, tweets/social posts, a website, executive summaries, the full paper, and even a short video! I wish more studies went to these lengths.
October 22, 2018 at 08:19PM

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👓 What We Learned from Studying the News Consumption Habits of College Students | Dan Cohen

Read What We Learned from Studying the News Consumption Habits of College Students by Dan CohenDan Cohen (Dan Cohen)
Over the last year, I was fortunate to help guide a study of the news consumption habits of college students, and coordinate Northeastern University Library’s services for the study, including great work by our data visualization specialist Steven Braun and necessary infrastructure from our digital team, including Sarah Sweeney and Hillary Corbett. “How Students Engage with News,” out today as both a long article and accompanying datasets and media, provides a full snapshot of how college students navigate our complex and high-velocity media environment.

Highlights, Quotes, Annotations, & Marginalia

Side note: After recently seeing Yale Art Gallery’s show “Seriously Funny: Caricature Through the Centuries,” I think there’s a good article to be written about the historical parallels between today’s visual memes and political cartoons from the past.  

This also makes me think back to other entertainments of the historical poor including the use/purpose of stained glass windows in church supposedly as a means of entertaining the illiterate Latin vulgate masses.
October 22, 2018 at 08:07PM

nearly 6,000 students from a wide variety of institutions  

Institutions = colleges/universities? Or are we also considering less educated youth as well?
October 22, 2018 at 08:08PM

A more active stance by librarians, journalists, educators, and others who convey truth-seeking habits is essential.  

In some sense these people can also be viewed as aggregators and curators of sorts. How can their work be aggregated and be used to compete with the poor algorithms of social media?
October 22, 2018 at 08:11PM

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Reply to Greg McVerry about DoOO paper

Replied to a post by Greg McVerryGreg McVerry (Quick Thoughts)
@chrisaldrich @jackjamieson and I are writing a case study analysis on #IndieWeb and #DoOO using GitHub markdown. It is a chapter for @shsabrams is editing. GitHub is a decent collaborative research space.

For a few minutes, I thought I was being drafted in as an author, in which case I’ll need some additional background information. I did find the repo.

Then I thought it might be a status update where it might be more apropos to replace the word “writing” with “living”.

But perhaps it was a simple @mention to notify me of an awesome little project?

In any case, I’m in, just let me know how much you need, when, and where!

🙂

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