Itch: UI for creating a TK editorial mark

Logged an itch UI for creating a TK editorial mark (indieweb.org)
TK is an abbreviated editorial mark made when writing, proofreading, or editing to indicate that a portion of the piece is to come some time in the future.

TK is an abbreviated editorial mark made when writing, proofreading, or editing to indicate that a portion of the piece is to come some time in the future.

Writers often use the combination when writing so as not to slow down the flow of their thought when they might otherwise need to look something up or do some research.

Because the letter combination TK is very rare in the English language it is easy to do a search or search/replace for the mark in digital documents.

Examples

Medium

When composing text in Medium if one writes a stand alone TK within the text, the text editor shows a yellow TK within the margin as an indicator to return to that place to finish the thought(s).

Example of a TK editorial mark in the Medium.com user interface.

See also

  • editor
  • create
  • UI
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👓 Distributor publicly released with Gutenberg support and Enterprise service offering | 10up

Read Distributor publicly released with Gutenberg support and Enterprise service offering by Jake GoldmanJake Goldman (10up)
We are proud to announce that Distributor has exited beta and is now openly available. Distributor is a free WordPress plugin that makes it easy to syndicate and reuse content across your websites—whether in a single multisite network or across the web with the REST API. With Distributor, content creators can "push" or "pull" content [...]
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👓 The End of the Blog | Kicks Condor

Read The End of the Blog by Kicks Condor (kickscondor.com)
Inspired by Brad Enslen’s ‘exit page’ concept, I’ve added a ‘the end’ post to this blog. (I also have to say that many of my upcoming changes are inspired by h0p3’s wiki—moving away from just a blog of recent posts, to a kind of modern home page with updates and Indieweb intertwingliness.) ‘The end’ can be seen right now on /page3, if you scroll to the very bottom. Small, needless things—lovely.

As I am semi-regularly importing more content to my site, I wonder about where to put the “end”. What happens when I post something and something gets imported at a timestamp before it? I’ll have to think about how to architect it so as not to need to move it around so much in the future.

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Sketches of my Home and About page designs

Replied to a post by Greg McVerryGreg McVerry (INTERTEXTrEVOLUTION)

For today’s #dailyponderance I want you to put the computer away, grab some paper and pencil and map out what you think your homepage and about me page should contain.

You don’t need to be an artist, boxes and stuick figures will do.

You don’t have to be writer. Copy can come later. Think layout.

If you already have an about me and a home page sketch it out for others to see what your “prototype” looks like.

I’ve actually been doing some small revamping of both my Home and my About pages on the site recently, so this is actually a nice little exercise that’s reminding me about some of the small changes I’d like to effect. It also reminds me of some of the changes I want to make with regard to some of my menu structures too.

Lately I’ve added a bunch of different ways to slice and dice the content on my site so that readers can hopefully more easily find or discover the content they may be most interested in reading.  I’ve also been trying to pare down on the amount of information and detail which I present.

So without additional ado, here they are:

Home and About Page layouts

Improve comments admin UI to filter out likes and Swarm replies

Logged an itch Improve comments admin UI to filter out likes and Swarm replies

I’d been considering figuring this out before given the high incidence of likes on my posts, particularly from POSSE copies, but now that I’ve fixed checkins on my site, Swarm is also sending a lot of small replies, which while nice, are adding a lot of noise to my comments dashboard.

Perhaps I can figure out a way to use query parameters to filter out some of the like webmentions and replies from Swarm so that I’m not really building anything new?

Sometimes you make a major step forward and it creates new UI problems. We’ll get there eventually.

👓 Dashboard Makeover Removes Incoming Links Widget | WordPress Tavern

Read Dashboard Makeover Removes Incoming Links Widget (WordPress Tavern)
When the dashboard redesign is officially added to WordPress core, it looks like it will be missing a widget that’s been with the software since 2005 when the Dashboard feature was introduced…

I can think of some interesting uses for this… perhaps worth tinkering?

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Replied to Sharing brief @IndieWebSummit notes as they come to mind. by Tantek ÇelikTantek Çelik (tantek.com)
Sharing brief @IndieWebSummit notes as they come to mind.

This was the first year people pre-wrote proposals before the #BarCamp organizing session. As facilitator I decided to have people who never proposed before go first.
 
Coincidentally, @Christi3k just announced the same thing @OSBridge unconference organizing session.

This may be worth codifing as a normal practice. Let first-timers propose sessions first before anyone who has done this before, especially at an @IndieWebCamp before.

The other thing I did was, after the the first-timers finished explaining and scheduling their BarCamp session proposals, I had people *other than* the remaining session proposers choose from the remaining session proposals posted on the side of the grid, and advocate for them. I think that worked quite well for selecting for the sessions that were more compelling for more people.

I was just thinking about how this might be codified a bit better as well, particularly for folks who are attending their first BarCamp-style event.

While there is some implication in the event pages, I don’t know if some people were expecting the sessions and planning to play out the way they did (or if they knew what to expect on that front at all, particularly in chatting with people in the early morning registration/breakfast part of the day).

It was certainly more productive for me to think about and post some of the things I wanted to accomplish pre-camp. (It also helped to have your reminder a month or more ago about what I might build before even going to the summit.)

Having additional time to know what the scheduling process looks like, if nothing else, gives people a bit more time to think about what they want to get out of the conference and propose some additional ideas without being under the short time crunch. This is particularly apropos when the morning presentations may have run long and the conference is already a few minutes off track and we’re eating into valuable session time otherwise. I would suspect that helping to get the session ideas flowing sooner than later may also help the idea and creative processes, and even more so for participants who may need a bit more time to organize their thoughts and communicate them as they’d like.

I definitely liked the process of having beginners go first and then letting people advocate for particular ideas thereafter. This worked particularly well for an established event and one with so many people. It might be helpful to pre-select one potentially popular proposal from an older hand to go first though, to provide an example of the process for those who are new to it, and in particular those who might be quiet, shy, or not be the type to raise their hands and advocate in front of such a large group. In fact, given this, another option is to allow people to propose sessions and then allow advocation across the board, but for beginners first followed by everyone thereafter. This may also encourage better thought out initial proposals as well.

Thanks again for all your hard work and preparation Tantek!

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Logged an itch Create an itch post kind on my website (indieweb.org)
Itches, in the context of the IndieWeb, are individuals's personal sources of annoyances using the web or in particular their own website, that they use to itemize and prioritize what to create, design, build, and improve on their own website, often by first listing such "itches" on a section in their User: page or their own website.

I seem to have so many itches of things I’d like to do on my website, it seemed like a good idea to have an itch post type so I can more easily collect them in one place and have an archive of my itches. I’m using an experimental microformat itch-of for display.