Read Alternative Tweet Embedding by Stefan Bohacek (fourtonfish.com)
When you embed Tweets on your website, Twitter asks you to include their JavaScript code that adds images, number of likes, and loads their styles. But looking at the size of all the script files (yes, the one script tag loads multiple JavaScript files), does quite a bit more than that, including tracking your website’s users. And it has pretty negative impact on your site’s performance as measured by Google PageSpeed.
Update: This seems to have disappeared and roughly remapped to https://fourtonfish.com/project/tweet-embeds-wordpress-plugin/

Feature request: Recent Kinds Widgets and/or Now page aggregation

Filed an Issue Post Kinds Plugin for WordPress (GitHub)
adds support for responding to and interacting with other sites using the standards developed by the Indieweb Community - dshanske/indieweb-post-kinds

Recent Kinds Widget

It’s a reasonably frequent design/functionality pattern to see widgets from social media services. (Goodreads is an example that provides a widget for recent reads. Twitter does so for notes. There are countless others.) 

In an IndieWeb world, it would be nice to highlight what one has recently read, watched, or listened to (as examples). Towards this functionality, it would be nice if Post Kinds could provide the ability to add widgets for a variety of the post kinds to sidebars or footers.

As a baseline I could envision each widget having:

  • a configurable title (“Recently read”, “Food diary” for eats & drinks, “Microblog” for recent notes, bookmarks, etc.)
  • a chooser for one (or more) of the many various (enabled) kinds
  • a variable N to allow for display of the N most recent of the chosen kinds; 5 or 10 might be a reasonable default; a time-based variable to run across the post within a recent period (days, weeks, months) might be a an interesting alternative as well

For display of a single kind, the widget might default to displaying:

  • a heading made of the post kind icon along with “Recent [Post Kind Name plural]”
  • Response Property Name (wrapped with the original permalink if it exists) by Author name (if it exists)
  • An optional published date for the original content (if it exists) or the date the site owner published the post kind (if it exists) (the original content date would be better for context, I think)
  • A fleuron () or hash (#) which could be wrapped with the permalink of the original Post Kind post.

UI example: 

 

If the chooser in the widget allows for displaying multiple kinds at the same time, then one could have a widget for “Recent Media Consumed” or for displaying a sidebar microblog that could include Notes, bookmarks, reads, etc. (Making it similar to embedding one’s Twitter feed into a sidebar.

For encouraging outside consumption, the widget could also have a small RSS icon with a link to that Kind’s (or Kinds’) feed.

Naturally there could be some configuration for reasonable display defaults for some of the various Post Kinds./

Now archive page

Given some of the potential similarity of the widget work above, it would also be fun to have Post Kinds generate an archive page that shows by kind either the N most recent posts for each kind or all the posts within the last M days, O weeks, or P months.

This could be used to automatically generate the idea of a Now page that gives a quick overview of what a person has been up to over a relatively recent time period. A month of posts would be a good default.

One might also be able to use a solution like How to Add WordPress Widgets in Post and Page Content as a means of embedding the widgets into such a Now-type page, which could give the user the ability to pick and choose which order to place the particular kinds into based on the site owner’s discretion.

Read Automatically sending Webmentions from a static website by James Mead (jamesmead.org)
Using Actionsflow to automate the sending of Webmentions using webmention.app
This is an interesting way for static sites to automatically send webmentions using RSS.

Perhaps it’s something I might use in conjunction with my work with TiddlyWiki, MediaWiki, or my Obsidian.md notebook projects.

Replied to Feature Request (Reclaim Hosting Community)
Have anything you would like to see happen in Reclaim Cloud? Maybe you want to see an application in the Marketplace? A feature in the Dashboard? Share your thoughts here!
I could see a potential demand (beyond me) for a one-click install of Hypothesis, the open source, web annotation, highlight, and bookmarking service. It’s got a number of moving pieces and should be ideal for such a cloud-based use case and likely has a significant overlap with the customer base for Reclaim.

Main company site: https://web.hypothes.is/ 2
GitHub repositories: Hypothesis · GitHub 3
Documentation for set up using docker: Installation guide — The Hypothesis Annotation Framework 0.0.2 documentation 1

Given what it offers, I could see people also potentially using it as a CMS, blogging platform, or social bookmarking platform:

Read Blog graph by Dima GerasimovDima Gerasimov (beepb00p.xyz)

This is an experiment, an alternative way to represent blog posts, as a graph. Click this if you want to get back to the plain list.

The idea is that if you encounter a blog, it's often unclear how to start reading it: typically it's an overwhelming linear list of posts, ordered by date. (thanks Jonathan for bringing my attention to it!)

Representing as a graph allows to relax this linear structure by introducing a partial order (shown by edges). You can start reading from a title that seems most interesting to you, and keep exploring the related posts.

  • clicking on a post title brings you to the post
  • clicking on a tag will bring you to the description of the tag
  • clicking on a date will highlight all connections to the corresponding post, to make the navigation easier
  • clusters correspond to 'themes' (although it's pretty fuzzy)

If you have any ideas on improving this page, or notice any problems, please let me know! You can find the source here.

An interesting visualization for the content in a blog. Somewhat reminiscent of the modus operandi of TiddlyMap. 

This is the sort of thing that Maggie Appleton and the digital gardens gang would appreciate.

Read RSS is not dead you know (nor is Atom) by Sebastiaan AndewegSebastiaan Andeweg (seblog.nl)
Quite a while I wrote about building a social reader[^ Then called IndieWeb reader, but social reader is the better term.], but these days I have to admit it went nowhere. The biggest problem with it being that I myself don’t really use any reader to consume stuff: I was not used to keeping up wit...
I need to do some deep thinking and design layout of the feed reader I’d like to have. Something like a cross between some of the traditional readers like Inoreader and Fraidy.cat which has some of the time-based and social sorting that Ton has suggested in the past.
Read Fun synonyms for art museum guards by Matt Maldre (Spudart)
I’m brainstorming ways of describing art museum guards.  Art museum security guardArt protectorGallery attendantLaw enforcementMuseum access controlMuseum patrolMuseum protectorObserver of visitorsParcel inspectorPolicy enforcerPreventer of suspicious actionsPreventer of touchingProper propriety maintainerProperty guardProtection services officerSecuritySecurity officerVandalism deterrent My favorite might be the last one, Vandalism deterrent. It’s so true, but also feels so odd to describe that …
I like the idea of having a generator for tangential taxonomies for improving search. How could I build this into my website?
Read PESOS for Pocket by Charlotte AllenCharlotte Allen (charlotteallen.info)
A few weeks ago, I made a post about how I got PESOS working for Facebook and Instagram using IFTTT. Now, I’ve gone ahead and done something similar with Pocket and IFTTT!
The code is similar to my linked post. As always, you’ll want to customize everything for your own needs, as well as add your own auth token.
A great way to leverage Micropub!
I’ve noticed that Bloomberg Businessweek’s Jealousy List for 2020 has quirky little animated drolleries racing around on it as you scroll up and down the page.

This makes me wonder what web designers and developers would put on their own personal jealousy lists for 2020. What types of features and functionality have you seen this year that you’d love to have on your own website or in your own projects?

Replied to Show conditional Twitter intents with Eleventy by Sia KaramalegosSia Karamalegos (sia.codes)
Encourage users to retweet or share a post based on whether a Tweet already exists for your blog post.
This reminds me that I had done a portion of this sort of work for my site a while back as a proof of concept and particularly with relation to Threaded conversations between WordPress and Twitter. I had meant to finish the sketch and turn it into a WordPress plugin or possibly roll it up into the Syndication Links plugin. Perhaps that makes sense as I’m already using it to show where I’ve syndicated copies of my content and it will contain the appropriate tweet ID data. Similar UI could be added for content sent to Flickr, Instagram, and Mastodon presuming the provide similar actions. Perhaps this will be a mini project I can circle back around to during the pending holidays?

I love how Sia has implemented it on her static Eleventy site where she’s kept the UI nice and clean. I particularly like the way she’s done the design and layout and made it more like a call to action.

Sia's Twitter call to action showing a Twitter blue bird icon with the text "Join the conversation on Twitter. Or, if you liked this article and think others should read it, please retweet it."

To take the Twitter actions a half-step further, she could URL wrap the word “liked” with the like action on Twitter.

In general, this reminds me a lot of the idea of webactions, though I don’t think that many have been experimenting with them as of late. Perhaps it’s because of the growth of Microsub-based feed readers that have built-in Micropub support?

Hat-tip:

👓 Backfeed without code | Ryan Barrett

Read Backfeed without code by Ryan BarrettRyan Barrett (snarfed.org)
I’ve spent most of my time in the IndieWeb on backfeed: sending interactions from social networks back to your web site. Bridgy, the service we built, has served that need wel...
This sounds like a lovely and simple idea. Definitely worth attempting as a simple method.