Read 23 2019.06.25 - TWGGF: The Future of Large Tiddlywikis by h0p3 (philosopher.life)
What does the future hold for large Tiddlywikis? What can I do right now to start optimizing my TW to be usable while still huge. I am grateful to the TW contributors and those who made one of my browser engines. This has to be one of the best FOSS communities I've ever had the privilege of participating in. I need the advice of experts.
If h0p3 is worrying about this just a few years in, I’m worried that I’ll be terrified. I’d end up posting to my person wiki even more often than my personal website… hmmm.
Replied to a tweet by James BernardJames Bernard (Twitter)
James, I’ve been watching a few people use public-facing TiddlyWikis for “hyperchat“. One of them also has it set up with Webmention functionality so that other sites can send it notifications (though they’re not yet displaying them). To me this looks like the beginning of a different sort of social network and online communication.

I ran across an example yesterday of someone using a private local TiddlyWiki as a static site web generator, which is quite different from people hosting them directly on web servers.

I’m interested in off-label use cases for wikis (particularly in the vein of commonplace books), so do let us know when your article comes out.

I’ve started a TiddlyWiki stub on the IndieWeb wiki for those who are using it as a personal website. I’m working toward using it as a commonplace book for myself, and it would be cool to see it add Microformats v2, an h-card set up for author identity. I’ve noticed that Sphygm.us has hers set up with at least incoming Webmention support, which is awesome!

 

Replied to Questions (Reclaim Hosting Community)
Everyone has questions and most likely someone here has an answer for you. Whether it be about hosting, domains, or anything else you need help with, this is the place to ask.
I’ve been looking closer at wikis, online commonplace books, and similar personal/work/lab/research notebooks recently and have come across TiddlyWiki as a useful, simple, but very flexible possibility.

While most of its ecosystem revolves around methods for running the program locally (and often privately) or in Google or Dropbox storage, I’ve come across a growing number of people hosting their instances on their own servers and using them publicly as a melange of personal websites, blogs, and wikis.

Has anyone tried hosting one (particularly the newer TW5) through Reclaim before? Of the many methods, I’m curious which may be the easiest/simplest from a set up perspective?

Here are some interesting examples I’ve come across:
* “A Thesis Notebook” by Alberto Molina
* PESpot Lesson Planner by Patrick Detzner (this one seems to be heavily modified)
* sphygm.us

Bookmarked Great Expectations (Serapis Classics) (7switch.com)
An ebook published using TiddlyWiki
An interesting example of a book published using TiddlyWiki as an ebook platform. It also enables highlighting and annotations to boot! I’m curious how well it works with Hypothes.is given their anchoring schemes?
Bookmarked TiddlyBlink — TiddlyWiki with bi-directional linking (giffmex.org)

TiddlyBlink is an adaptation of TiddlyWiki with the goal of helping you see connections between your ideas, and move quickly from one idea to another. It was inspired by the bi-directional linking found in Roam (https://roamresearch.com/), but built with capabilities already available in TiddlyWiki (https://tiddlywiki.com). See my example file here.

If he hasn’t seen this, it seems like the sort of thing that Jack Baty would appreciate.

I wonder if he’s considered using webmention.io to work with his TiddlyWiki? I’ve set it up with my MediaWiki set up, but still need to tinker with it on a public TiddlyWiki.

Small progress in my wiki explorations and a fix to my MediaWiki administrative user email address

I’d looking into maintaining a wiki a while back and have recently been determined to get back to it. As a result, I’ve been looking at TiddlyWiki since that’s what some of Kicks Condor‘s group has been using. (Yep, I’ve still got that tab opened and am tinkering away slowly on the ideas–but mostly the technology.)

I’ve been having some issues in self-hosting a TiddlyWiki the way I’d like to. If anyone has any clear cut documentation on how to host a TiddlyWiki on one’s own domain name, I’d appreciate it. The documentation doesn’t seem as clear as I would expect (or perhaps more likely my server is having issues propagating/connecting?). If anything it’s muddled by the fact that they can seemingly be hosted in dozens of places one might not otherwise expect. My primary reservation is that it looks to me like they’re designed as single user instances, so I’m not exactly sure how Kicks et al. are effectuating their hyperconversations. Part of my issue is my mental model of some of the wikis involved in addition to the busy-ness of the sites’ themes, not to mention some of the non-standard conversational style on some. (I’ll get there eventually.)

I’ve also been using the IndieWeb’s MediaWiki for several years, so I’ve become much better at how it works as well as the ins-and-outs of the markup and how to do some slightly more advanced things using it. I’d set one up nearly a year ago this month and used it sporadically at best.

One of the bigger problems with my MediaWiki install was that somehow I wasn’t able to log into the primary account to do some of the necessary administrative functions. Today I got fed up with being hampered a bit and went spelunking into my install to see where things went wrong, suspecting that it was a one button install issue.

After digging through some documentation, I dug into the mySQL database and found a daunting looking [Blob] in the user_email field. Why couldn’t it be an easy-to-edit field? I not knowing anything better to do, I downloaded it, opened it up in my text editor, and discovered that I’d managed to leave a letter out of my own name in the email address! No wonder it wouldn’t work and the system wouldn’t let me reset my email address or password. A quick text edit later, the email was fixed, I uploaded the (now less intimidating) [Blob], and did a reset of the password in the admin interface, and we’re back in business! I’m always glad not to have borked the entire database and site.

If nothing else, it’ll help me in my explorations. Onward.

Bookmarked TiddlyWiki — a non-linear personal web notebook (tiddlywiki.com)

Have you ever had the feeling that your head is not quite big enough to hold everything you need to remember?

Welcome to TiddlyWiki, a unique non-linear notebook for capturingorganising and sharing complex information.

Use it to keep your to-do list, to plan an essay or novel, or to organise your wedding. Record every thought that crosses your brain, or build a flexible and responsive website.

Unlike conventional online services, TiddlyWiki lets you choose where to keep your data, guaranteeing that in the decades to come you will still be able to use the notes you take today.

Read Hyperchatting by Jack BatyJack Baty (baty.blog)
People seem very focused on technological solutions to online communication (ActivityPub, Indieweb, this absurd BlueSky idea), but the hyperconversation approach is trying to prove that the problem is a human problem. If you read and listen to each other and try to respond thoughtfully and carefully - and try to
Read TiddlyWiki and Roam and my Daily Notes by Jack Baty (baty.blog)
A few notes about differences between TiddlyWiki and Roam related to my daily note taking process. In October, 2018, I created a wiki at rudimentarylathe.org using the wonderful TiddlyWiki. Since then I've written just shy of 1,000 "tiddlers" there and it's been a totally pleasant experience. The original