📺 IndieWebCamp New Haven | YouTube

Watched IndieWebCamp New Haven 2019 from YouTube

Introductions and Keynote: Connected Learning & the IndieWeb by Kimberly Hirsh
at Southern Connecticut State University, Davis Hall, 501 Crescent Avenue, 06515 New Haven, Connecticut.

I had joined a tad late this morning and only watched the YouTube stream instead of joining the Google Hangout channel.

I wanted to rewatch the entire opening to see Kimberly Hirsh’s keynote a second time. I almost feel bad that she gave it remotely so that she couldn’t experience the direct feedback and adulation of people watching it live. Of course the benefit of a streamed version is that I got to watch it bleary-eyed in my pajamas (because of the time difference between New Haven and Los Angeles) and it will live on for others to watch and enjoy long into the future.

Congratulations Kimberly! And thanks again for taking the time to talk to all of us.

Looking forward to brainstorming about  books at the next session at IndieWebCamp New Haven in about 30 minutes.

 

RSVPed Attending IndieWebCamp New Haven 2019
IndieWebCamp New Haven is the first in Elm City, happening at Southern Connecticut State University, Participants are welcome to join the community to explore how owning your data and controlling the web helps to protect under-served communities.

Attending remotely.

👓 Announcing @IndieWebCamp New Haven Keynote | Greg McVerry

Read Announcing @IndieWebCamp New Haven Keynote by Greg McVerryGreg McVerry (quickthoughts.jgregorymcverry.com)
I am happy to announce that Kimberly Hirsh will join us as the key note for IndieWebCamp New Haven.

I can’t wait to hear what Kimberly Hirsh comes up with for the upcoming camp!

IndieWebCamp Online 2019 and What to Expect at Camps

Over the weekend, I attended my first online-only IndieWebCamp thanks in large part to some excellent planning and execution by Eddie Hinkle, Greg McVerry, and David Shanske. I’ve attended many camps both in person and remotely but somehow managed to miss that first IndieWebCamp Online in 2014.

I remember a few years back hosting my very first IndieWebCamp in Los Angeles. I had only done a small handful of HomeBrew Website Club meetups up to that point, so I was excited that the community rallied around the camp to help make it what it was particularly since I didn’t have half a clue. At the time, I remember being excited that one of the co-founders of the BarCamp concept was attending not only the first BarCamp I had ever hosted, but had ever attended–sure, no pressure there, right?!. While there, I was also floored to see one of the most experienced web designers in the world ever-so-patiently sit down with several people on a volunteer basis and help them learn to write raw HTML for the first time to make their very first websites. The entire thing was a mix of kindness, excitement, and exhilaration I’ve only ever seen  and experienced at IndieWebCamps. 

This past weekend was not very different from that first camp. Over the weekend, however, I did hear from a few folks who said that they had issues finding and accessing resources to make their camp experiences like the ones I’ve experienced. Sadly, some of them gave up altogether. It’s often the case that the old hands and organizers, even with the best intentions, can’t think of everything or remember what it was like before they knew what they know now. In searching through the IndieWeb wiki, I noticed that there were few resources directed specifically towards first time campers. While there’s a LOT there for newcomers (maybe even too much), all of it is very spread out and takes too much time and effort to sift through quickly, so I spent some time at the end of camp to put together a quick overview of what to expect at an IndieWebCamp as well as some technology basics for campers and people new to the IndieWeb. Naturally there are links to other resources for those who want more, but hopefully it’s got the immediate resources that many will be looking for.

If you’re an “old hand” I’d ask you to read over the page and add anything I may have missed or which could assuredly be improved, clarified, or even shortened.

If you’re new to the game, I’d welcome you to let us know what other things might worry you, you’re unsure of, or don’t get going into such a camp or which might not be clear on that page or any of the other pages one might access when first approaching any of the camps and their resources. (You can give me your feedback directly in the comments below or via your favorite mode of communication. I’ll add them and answers to the wiki on yours and others’ behalf.)

Hopefully over time, we’ll have some better resources for first time campers to have the same sort of first time camp experiences I managed to get lucky enough to stumble into myself that first time and had yet again this weekend.

See you at the next camp!

👓 IndieWebCamp Online 2019 | Eddie Hinkle

Read IndieWebCamp Online 2019 by Eddie HinkleEddie Hinkle (eddiehinkle.com)
So this past weekend, I helped host IndieWebCamp Online 2019. It was a really fun weekend, if a little unorthodox. I think the camp was successful and enjoyed and yet had learn-able take-aways for the next online camp as well as ideas for single topic sessions which is a bridge somewhere between an ...

A nice recap of the weekend. Thanks again Eddie for all your hard work!

📅 RSVP for IndieWebCamp Online 2019

RSVPed Attending IndieWebCamp Online 2019
IndieWebCamp Online 2019 is a gathering for independent web creators of all kinds, from graphic artists, to designers, UX engineers, coders, hackers, to share ideas, actively work on creating for their own personal websites, and build upon each others creations.

I’ve already started brainstorming sessions and am glad that you can propose them online already in preparation for Friday!

And there’s always something magical about seeing an event on the web and being able to RSVP to it directly from my own website and having the site show my response. If only the rest of the world worked so well…

Reminder: IndieWebCamp Austin (& streaming) is this Weekend 2/23-24

Here’s a quick reminder that IndieWebCamp Austin is this weekend. If you’re in the , , or spaces and can’t attend in person, there should be some interesting conversations and work that can be done to participate remotely (via chat, video, etc.) to help you improve and better use your personal website.

We welcome anyone who is interested, so feel free to pass the invitation along to your colleagues, students, and friends who are interested in using their websites as more than “just a business card” or “just a blog”. Even if you don’t yet have a domain or web hosting, show up and we’ll see what we can help you create over the weekend. 

Feel free to come with ideas, propose an online session (maybe?!!), or just watch, listen, and absorb ideas from others. Find out more about what you can do with a simple domain name and website.

Perhaps sometime in the future we ought to have an IndieWebCamp specifically for the education space?! Let me know if you’re interested in helping to organize one.

Of course if you can’t join us this weekend, there is an IndieWebCamp Online coming up on 

Don’t worry if you can’t RSVP this late, just show up… We all hope to see you there!


👤 Stephen Downes,William Ian O’ByrneGreg McVerryKimberly Hirsh,  John JohnstonAaron DavisCathie LeBlanc,   Kathleen FitzpatrickNate AngellRobin DeRosa, Jon Udell, Dan CohenTim OwensTaylor JadinMark GrabeRick WysockiDoug HoltonJim GroomAnelise H. ShroutJeffrey KeeferJeremy DeanAudrey WattersDan ScottAntonio Sánchez-PadialMiriam AveryTom CritchlowKen BauerKim HansenLarry Sanger 

📅 RSVP for IndieWebCamp Austin 2019

RSVPed Attending IndieWebCamp Austin - Feb 23-24, 2019 - Austin, Texas
IndieWebCamp Austin 2019 is a gathering for independent web creators of all kinds, from graphic artists, to designers, UX engineers, coders, hackers, to share ideas, actively work on creating for their own personal websites, and build upon each others creations.

I’ve desperately been wanting to go since it was announced, but sadly the best I’ll be able to do this weekend is attend virtually. While I won’t be able to see people in person, I’ll be there in chat, watching the streaming video and supporting everyone. 

If you’re planning on going and need any help/advice with getting WordPress going this weekend, please don’t hesitate to reach out with any questions.

Special thanks to organizers Manton and Tantek and all the other fantastic community members who are putting this together!

❤️ Registration for IndieWebCamp Online 2019 is open! | Eddie Hinkle

Liked a post by Eddie HinkleEddie Hinkle (eddiehinkle.com)

Registration for IndieWebCamp Online 2019 is open!, it's the first IndieWebCamp based on the internet since 2014 and we're experimenting with really embracing the internet medium for everything it has. Come experiment with us?

🎧 IndieWebCamp Berlin 2018 Session Summaries | Marty McGuire

Listened to IndieWebCamp Berlin 2018 Session Summaries by Marty McGuireMarty McGuire from martymcgui.re

Listen to a summary of all the sessions at IndieWebCamp Berlin 2018!

Session notes: https://indieweb.org/2018/Berlin/Sessions

Narration by Marty McGuire
Edited by Aaron Parecki

This is a repost of https://aaronparecki.com/2018/11/18/7/indiewebcamp-berlin.

Interesting to see this served from Aaron’s domain when it looks and sounds just like another of Marty’s podcast. I’m guessing they collaborated at camp to put it together. I love the idea of not only having this as a quick audio summary of all the sessions, which I’ll now have to go back and watch a few, but of having this as a simple section at the end of day one at IndieWebCamps.

The sessions on Microformats, Displaying Responses, Data Ethics, Making your website work offline, and Location sound like interesting things to take deeper looks into. I particularly like the idea of separating the legal and the ethical portions completely away from each other and doing the ethical portion first and then secondly filtering that through any legal loopholes. Ideally the legal filter won’t actually be filtering anything out if the ethical is done properly, and if it does, then perhaps the legal has some issues.

👓 #IndieWebCamp Returns to New York City | Greg McVerry

Read #IndieWebCamp Returns to New York City by Greg McVerryGreg McVerry (jgregorymcverry.com)
We need to take back the web. It is time to seize control of your own data, take control of your data and help build a community that shares your values. Please join us and the The Siedenberg Computer Science and Information Systems School at Pace University https://www.pace.edu/seidenberg/ for two ...

Wahoo! Good work Greg!

Given the location and some of the potential topics, this portends some interesting things!

Replied to Sharing brief @IndieWebSummit notes as they come to mind. by Tantek ÇelikTantek Çelik (tantek.com)
Sharing brief @IndieWebSummit notes as they come to mind.

This was the first year people pre-wrote proposals before the #BarCamp organizing session. As facilitator I decided to have people who never proposed before go first.
 
Coincidentally, @Christi3k just announced the same thing @OSBridge unconference organizing session.

This may be worth codifing as a normal practice. Let first-timers propose sessions first before anyone who has done this before, especially at an @IndieWebCamp before.

The other thing I did was, after the the first-timers finished explaining and scheduling their BarCamp session proposals, I had people *other than* the remaining session proposers choose from the remaining session proposals posted on the side of the grid, and advocate for them. I think that worked quite well for selecting for the sessions that were more compelling for more people.

I was just thinking about how this might be codified a bit better as well, particularly for folks who are attending their first BarCamp-style event.

While there is some implication in the event pages, I don’t know if some people were expecting the sessions and planning to play out the way they did (or if they knew what to expect on that front at all, particularly in chatting with people in the early morning registration/breakfast part of the day).

It was certainly more productive for me to think about and post some of the things I wanted to accomplish pre-camp. (It also helped to have your reminder a month or more ago about what I might build before even going to the summit.)

Having additional time to know what the scheduling process looks like, if nothing else, gives people a bit more time to think about what they want to get out of the conference and propose some additional ideas without being under the short time crunch. This is particularly apropos when the morning presentations may have run long and the conference is already a few minutes off track and we’re eating into valuable session time otherwise. I would suspect that helping to get the session ideas flowing sooner than later may also help the idea and creative processes, and even more so for participants who may need a bit more time to organize their thoughts and communicate them as they’d like.

I definitely liked the process of having beginners go first and then letting people advocate for particular ideas thereafter. This worked particularly well for an established event and one with so many people. It might be helpful to pre-select one potentially popular proposal from an older hand to go first though, to provide an example of the process for those who are new to it, and in particular those who might be quiet, shy, or not be the type to raise their hands and advocate in front of such a large group. In fact, given this, another option is to allow people to propose sessions and then allow advocation across the board, but for beginners first followed by everyone thereafter. This may also encourage better thought out initial proposals as well.

Thanks again for all your hard work and preparation Tantek!

There’s been some recent revival of chat about fragmentions and the fragmentioner within the IndieWeb community which enable the ability to more easily highlight and annotate individual portions of a web page and target them directly via URL.

This caused me to take a look at where the conversations on webmentions went within the Hypothesis project. Unless they’re hiding offline or somewhere else, it would appear that they’ve stalled, though I have a feeling that it could be an interesting notification method for Hypothesis to indicate to a site that it’s been highlighted or annotated. Also given that the Webmention spec is a W3C recommendation as of January 2017 compared to its status in 2014 when the topic was last brought up on the GitHub repo.

As a result of the above, if they’re free, I’d love to extend an invitation to Dan Whaley (t), Jon Udell (t), Jeremy Dean (t), Nate Angell (t), or anyone else working on the Hypothes.is project to join us in Portland this June 26-27 for the annual IndieWebSummit / IndieWebCamp.  I highly suspect there will be some heavy interest in the topics of open ways of annotating, highlighting, and notifying websites as well as UI/UX discussion around this area which we can all continue to expand and improve upon. And naturally there are sure to be a broad area of other topics at the summit that will be of interest in addition to these.