👓 The Sound of Silence | Numbers Were Burning

Read The Sound of Silence by Ron ChesterRon Chester (numbers-were-burning.blogspot.com)
I just got back from the SF Symphony performance of Mahler's Ninth Symphony. It was a most amazing experience, in a most unexpected way. I'm writing this partly as my way of reliving and duplicating what occurred, and partly to keep myself from being stuck in the win of it for the rest of time.

A stunning story here. I love the concept of not only silence being a part of the performance, but the way in which the music and the conductor come together to create the space to make it happen. Storytellers should be aware of this type of direction.

Highlights, Quotes, Annotations, & Marginalia

The speaker made the point that Mahler gives the second violins their own voice, rather than merely having them give depth or support to the first violins. Because of this, he said the conductor (Herbert Blomstedt) had decided to use a placement of the performers that was becoming common in Europe for the Ninth.
Instead of having all the violins on the left of the conductor, with the 1st violins on the outside and the 2nd violins on the inside, he was placing the 1st violins in their usual position, but the second violins would be on the right side of the conductor. This would have the effect of separating the voices so they could be more easily heard.  

November 29, 2018 at 11:11AM

The conductor became frozen, with his arms in the air, just as when he was conducting.
And he was still conducting! Only now he was conducting the silence! No one moved, the concert hall was completely enveloped in peace. With the conductor’s arms still up, and the violin bows still poised above the strings, no one dared to applaud. If they were wrong and it was not the end, their clapping would be a rude interruption of the music. And I’m sure that was exactly what the conductor intended!  

November 29, 2018 at 11:15AM

Hat tip: Turning Points by Ron Chester

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It’s only been in the last couple of weeks that I’ve paid more attention to the lyrics in Jim Croce’s song You Don’t Mess Around with Jim to notice that within the story unfolding in the song that the refrain changes in the end and changes the phrase “You don’t mess around with Jim” to “You don’t mess around with Slim“. It’s subtle, but underlines the inherent gruesomeness of the song.

Now I’ll have to go back and revisit his later song Bad, Bad Leroy Brown.

👓 New York Is Killing Me | The New Yorker

Read New York Is Killing Me by Alec WilkinsonAlec Wilkinson (The New Yorker)
Gil Scott-Heron is frequently called the “godfather of rap,” which is an epithet he doesn’t really care for. In 1968, when he was nineteen, he wrote a satirical spoken-word piece called “The Revolution Will Not Be Televised.” It was released on a very small label in 1970 and was probably heard of more than heard, but it had a following. It is the species of classic that sounds as subversive and intelligent now as it did when it was new, even though some of the references—Spiro Agnew, Natalie Wood, Roy Wilkins, Hooterville—have become dated. By the time Scott-Heron was twenty-three, he had published two novels and a book of poems and recorded three albums, each of which prospered modestly, but “The Revolution Will Not Be Televised” made him famous.
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👓 Big Changes Ahead for FMA | Free Music Archive

Read Big Changes Ahead for FMA by cheyenne_h (FMA Admin) (Free Music Archive)
We regret to inform you that due to a funding shortage, the FMA will be closing down later this month. The future of the archive is uncertain, but we have done everything we can to ensure that our files will not disappear from the web forever. The full audio collection will be backed up and available at https://archive.org/details/freemusicarchive (some of the collection is already there; feel free to go browse).

Internet related archives are important but fragile things. It’s sad to see when archives like this go down, particularly due to funding reasons.

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👓 Chaka Khan Selected as Rose Parade’s Grand Marshal | Pasadena Now

Read Chaka Khan Selected as Rose Parade's Grand Marshal by Madelyn Pennino and Angela Underwood (pasadenanow.com)
Khan, a 10-time Grammy Award winner, will both ride in 130th Rose Parade and perform in the pre-game celebration at the 105th Rose Bowl Game. Khan said she has been a fan of the Rose Parade for many years and is looking forward to performing.
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👓 SiriusXM to Acquire Pandora, Creating World’s Largest Audio Entertainment Company | Pandora

Read SiriusXM to Acquire Pandora, Creating World’s Largest Audio Entertainment Company (blog.pandora.com)
You may have noticed that big things are happening at Pandora. Earlier today, we announced that we’ve entered into an agreement to be acquired by SiriusXM, in an all-stock transaction, valued at approximately $3.5 billion. Here’s what this means for our listeners, and why we’re excited: First...
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🎧 Analysis, Parapraxis, Elvis, Season 3 Episode 10 | Revisionist History

Listened to Analysis, Parapraxis, Elvis, Season 3 Episode 10 by Malcolm Gladwell from Revisionist History

"The one song The King couldn’t sing."

Elvis Presley returned from his years in the army to record one of his biggest hits, “Are You Lonesome Tonight?” But he could never quite get the lyrics right. Why? Revisionist History puts the King of Rock and Roll on the couch.

I expected Gladwell to circle back around to the opening song about beating the dog, but he left us hanging…

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👓 Dolly Parton’s “Jolene” Slowed Down to 33RPM Sounds Great and Takes on New, Unexpected Meanings | Open Culture

Read Dolly Parton’s “Jolene” Slowed Down to 33RPM Sounds Great and Takes on New, Unexpected Meanings (Open Culture)
The Walrus is… Dolly Parton? Not every record yields gold when played backwards or spun more slowly than recommended, but a 45 of Parton’s 1973 hit “Jolene” played at 33RPM not only sounds wonderful, it also manages to reframe the narrative.
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👓 40 Years Later, Talking Heads’ Most Valuable Member Is Still Its Most Under-Recognized | Paper Mag

Read 40 Years Later, Talking Heads’ Most Valuable Member Is Still Its Most Under-Recognized (PAPER)
Bassist Tina Weymouth contributions are some of the band's most iconic.
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