👓 Seona Dancing | SeonaDancing.com

Read Biography Seona Dancing (web.archive.org)
Seona Dancing was a 1980s British pop group best known for providing Ricky Gervais with his first taste of fame. The band was formed in 1982 by aspiring pop stars Bill Macrae and Ricky Gervais. Their single "More to Lose", released in 1983, only made it to number 70 on the Billboard charts, and the band quickly disbanded in 1984. A year later, in 1985, a DJ from 99.5 DWRT-FM in Manila in the Philippines started playing a song called "Fade" by Medium (also billed as "Medium" by Fade). It became a runaway hit, and the angsty theme song for many Filipino teenagers in the mid 1980s. Eventually, the identity of the song was revealed as "More to Lose" by Seona Dancing. Bill Macrae faded into obscurity, but years later Ricky Gervais found new fame as the co-writer and star of the hit BBC comedy The Office.
He definitely had a different look when he was young!

📺 Embarrassing 80’s – Ricky Gervais & Seona Dancing | YouTube

Watched Embarrassing 80's - Ricky Gervais & Seona Dancing from YouTube

Seona dancing was a 1980s British new wave group, best known for providing comedian Ricky Gervais with his first experiences as a public performer. Although the band were not successful, their single "More to Lose" went on to become a teen anthem in the Philippines.

In June 1982, in his final year as a student at University College London, Ricky Gervais and his friend Bill Macrae formed Seona Dancing, with Macrae writing the songs and playing keyboards and Gervais writing and singing the lyrics. After recording a sixteen-song demo tape, they were signed by London Records which released two of their singles: "More to Lose" and "Bitter Heart". In 1983, the duo performed their single "More to Lose" on the ITV syndicated children's television show Razzamatazz. Yet, despite the promotion of "Bitter Heart" through its music video and "More to Lose" by its TV performance, both singles failed to break the Top 40. With "More to Lose" charting at number 117 and "Bitter Heart" at number 79 on the UK Singles Chart. After the lacklustre performance of their two singles, the band split up in 1984.

Gervais went on to have a successful international career as a comedian and actor, while Macrae later embarked on a solo career, though he has not made any real media appearance since. When Jimmy Kimmel asked about Macrae in an interview in 2014, Gervais said jokingly, "I hope he got fat too."

👓 Elon Musk drops surprise rap single about Harambe | The Hill

Read Elon Musk drops surprise rap single about Harambe (TheHill)
Tesla CEO Elon Musk, weeks after the Securities and Exchange Commission asked a judge to hold him in contempt, has dropped a surprise rap sing
Because I’m reading it on April Fool’s Day, it could be insane, but then again so is Elon Musk, so we’ll have to do some research to see if this is actually true. Though it is also most likely an Elon Musk joke that’s getting widespread attention.

The tune is kinda catchy though…

❤️ jmsclee tweeted I’m absolutely crying at this. Sound on. https://t.co/BibRtM10sc

Liked a tweet by Clee Clee (Twitter)

👓 Electro-acoustic robot funk jam! | Chris Beckstrom

Read Electro-acoustic robot funk jam! (Chris Beckstrom's Homepage)
I’ve been getting busy working on my new project, a little band of musical robots. My short-term goal is to use MIDI from my computer to trigger these robot to hit things and make music. I’m experimenting with different techniques, creating different things for them to hit, and generally having ...

👓 WebApp: Readtrack

Read WebApp: Readtrack (Dented Reality)
Readtrack is an experimental tool built during the 2012 NYT TimesOpen Hack Day. It gives music recommendations based on the content you’re looking at by doing semantic analysis of the current…
This is a killer start for a fun little app.

🎧 Episode 097 Applied Mathematics & the Evolution of Music: An Interview With Natalia Komarova | HumanCurrent

Listened to Episode 097 Applied Mathematics & the Evolution of Music: An Interview With Natalia Komarova by Haley Campbell-GrossHaley Campbell-Gross from HumanCurrent

In this episode, Haley interviews Natalia Komarova, Chancellor's Professor of the School of Physical Sciences at the University of California, Irvine. Komarova talks with Haley at the Ninth International Conference on Complex Systems about her presentation, which explored using applied mathematics to study the spread of mutants, as well as the evolution of popular music.

There’s some interesting sounding research being described here. Be sure to circle back around to some of her papers.

🎵 Main Title “Somewhere in My Memory” (From “Home Alone”) – Voice by John Williams, Boston Pops Orchestra

Listened to Main Title "Somewhere in My Memory" (From "Home Alone") - Voice by John Williams, Boston Pops Orchestra from Home Alone (Original Motion Picture Soundtrack) [25th Anniversary Edition]

📺 The Biggest ‘Baby Shark’ Ever w/ Sophie Turner & Josh Groban | The Late Late Show with James Corden on YouTube

Watched The Biggest 'Baby Shark' Ever w/ Sophie Turner & Josh Groban from The Late Late Show with James Corden on YouTube

Let's face it: Baby Shark is an undeniable force. James invites his guests, Sophie Turner, playing the role of Mommy Shark, and Josh Groban, taking on the role of Daddy Shark, for the definitive performance of this global phenomenon.

This is just too awesome.

Hat tip: Aaron Davis

🎵 Santa Claus Is Coming To Town by Michael Bublé

Listened to Santa Claus Is Coming To Town by Michael Bublé from Capitol Studios
Reprogramming some of my radio pre-sets in the car. Apparently 105.1 FM is doing Christmas music instead of Country for the holidays.

👓 The Sound of Silence | Numbers Were Burning

Read The Sound of Silence by Ron ChesterRon Chester (numbers-were-burning.blogspot.com)
I just got back from the SF Symphony performance of Mahler's Ninth Symphony. It was a most amazing experience, in a most unexpected way. I'm writing this partly as my way of reliving and duplicating what occurred, and partly to keep myself from being stuck in the win of it for the rest of time.
A stunning story here. I love the concept of not only silence being a part of the performance, but the way in which the music and the conductor come together to create the space to make it happen. Storytellers should be aware of this type of direction.

Highlights, Quotes, Annotations, & Marginalia

The speaker made the point that Mahler gives the second violins their own voice, rather than merely having them give depth or support to the first violins. Because of this, he said the conductor (Herbert Blomstedt) had decided to use a placement of the performers that was becoming common in Europe for the Ninth.
Instead of having all the violins on the left of the conductor, with the 1st violins on the outside and the 2nd violins on the inside, he was placing the 1st violins in their usual position, but the second violins would be on the right side of the conductor. This would have the effect of separating the voices so they could be more easily heard.  

November 29, 2018 at 11:11AM

The conductor became frozen, with his arms in the air, just as when he was conducting.
And he was still conducting! Only now he was conducting the silence! No one moved, the concert hall was completely enveloped in peace. With the conductor’s arms still up, and the violin bows still poised above the strings, no one dared to applaud. If they were wrong and it was not the end, their clapping would be a rude interruption of the music. And I’m sure that was exactly what the conductor intended!  

November 29, 2018 at 11:15AM

Hat tip: Turning Points by Ron Chester

It’s only been in the last couple of weeks that I’ve paid more attention to the lyrics in Jim Croce’s song You Don’t Mess Around with Jim to notice that within the story unfolding in the song that the refrain changes in the end and changes the phrase “You don’t mess around with Jim” to “You don’t mess around with Slim“. It’s subtle, but underlines the inherent gruesomeness of the song.

Now I’ll have to go back and revisit his later song Bad, Bad Leroy Brown.

👓 New York Is Killing Me | The New Yorker

Read New York Is Killing Me by Alec WilkinsonAlec Wilkinson (The New Yorker)
Gil Scott-Heron is frequently called the “godfather of rap,” which is an epithet he doesn’t really care for. In 1968, when he was nineteen, he wrote a satirical spoken-word piece called “The Revolution Will Not Be Televised.” It was released on a very small label in 1970 and was probably heard of more than heard, but it had a following. It is the species of classic that sounds as subversive and intelligent now as it did when it was new, even though some of the references—Spiro Agnew, Natalie Wood, Roy Wilkins, Hooterville—have become dated. By the time Scott-Heron was twenty-three, he had published two novels and a book of poems and recorded three albums, each of which prospered modestly, but “The Revolution Will Not Be Televised” made him famous.