Burrowing owl by Scott Gruber | Dribbble

Read Burrowing owl by Scott GruberScott Gruber (Dribbble)

Charley Harper inspired

Artistic image of an owl that looks a bit like a microphone in shape and decoration

Scott mentioned this wonderful bit of his artwork at the vHWC tonight. While it’s an owl, I thought from some perspective that it looked a lot like a microphone and might make a good logo for Marty McGuire’s Screech Micropub app for podcasting. If you need some artwork, Scott says he’d love to see it used…

👓 The Smear: A career-killing lie almost ruined this rising Minneapolis dance star | City Pages

Read The Smear: A career-killing lie almost ruined this rising Minneapolis dance star (City Pages)

On the morning of October 21, 2017, the budding New York choreographer Jinah Parker was sitting in bed, her husband lying alongside, when she opened her email and found a deeply unsettling, one-paragraph message about her debut dance production.

The show was called SHE, a Choreoplay, an off-off-Broadway interpretative dance in which four women vividly monologize rape and abuse.

Parker wrote and directed. Her newlywed husband, Kevin Powell, was the producer. In 1992, as a tenacious 26-year-old activist, he appeared on the inaugural season of MTV’s genre-defining reality show, The Real World. In the decades since, he’d become a prolific public speaker, author of 13 books, and a two-time congressional candidate.

Powell also has a history of violence. He assaulted women in college and once shoved a girlfriend into a bathroom door. Now he’s a sophist of male fragility, and an essential component of his activist repertoire is to engage in public reflection—usually with equal parts self-effacement and self-righteousness—upon this personal shame.

A great example why hot takes involving coming at people and seemingly outting them without the appropriate research can be terribly dangerous.

It would seem that this couple got just what they had coming to them, though it’s a bit disingenuous that they can go to crowd funding platforms to spread the blame out. I’m hoping that it was only all the people to whom they spread their invective to that ended helping to foot part of their bill.

👓 Our Future | Bob Baker Marionette Theater

Read Our Future (Bob Baker Marionette Theater)
OUR FUTURE Bob Baker Marionette Theater now as a 501(c)3 nonprofit organization will transition our current operation into an institution to educate kids of all ages across Los Angeles and beyond, to celebrate imagination and creativity, and to rejuvenate appreciation for handcrafted puppetry and entertainment. As a nonprofit organization, we are owned by the community and exist to serve the community. Though Bob Baker was the founder of our organization, we exist now to celebrate, expand, and educate people on Bob Baker’s work and the concepts of puppetry and performance as a whole. The final day the Theater in its current location will be open to the public is Friday, November 23rd, 2018 (the day after Thanksgiving, which is the same day the Theater opened 55 years ago). One day later, on November 24, the Bob Baker Marionette Theater will open Bob Baker's Nutcracker presented at the Pasadena Playhouse for 5 weeks. For the first time in its history, this tradition will have a new home to share the holiday joy and imagination that generations have come to know and love. Performances will run through December 30. Tickets are now on sale at www.pasadenaplayhouse.org.

Happy Anniversary Bob Baker Marionette Theater!

When Couples Fight Over Books | WSJ

Read When Couples Fight Over Books (WSJ)
People feel possessive of books because they help form our beliefs. How couples keep, display and discard books can be the stuff of heated debate.

After bickering with her husband nonstop for a week recently, Amber Fallon made a huge sacrifice for love. Four books.

This represented an appeasement in the ongoing book battles between Ms. Fallon and her husband, John. Both are big readers. Both own many books. His are alphabetized in a floor-to-ceiling bookcase in their bedroom. Hers take up three of his shelves, fill their home office and stack precariously in a “To Be Read” pile in a corner.

When books start to spill onto tables and countertops, Mr. Fallon—who gives away many of his books once he’s read them—demands answers. Why does his wife need two copies of the same title? Why keep ones she’s already read? “She believes in some form of immortality by having books around,” says Mr. Fallon, 39, a systems technician.
Continue reading “When Couples Fight Over Books | WSJ”