👓 How I Twitter | Leo Laporte

Read How I Twitter by Leo Laporte (Leo Laporte)
As you may know I deactivated my half-million follower/bot twitter account last August. I don’t miss it at all except as a newsfeed. Twitter practically killed RSS readers by providing a firehose of instantaneously “curated” news. With all its flaws, that firehose is useful for a variety of re...

❤️ lpachter tweeted I once asked Robert McEliece whether he would mentor me.

Liked a tweet by Lior PachterLior Pachter (Twitter)

Idea for a spaced repetition user interface for Hypothes.is

While I’m thinking about younger students, I thought I’d sketch out a bit of an add-on product that I wish Hypothes.is had.

Background/Set up

I was looking at tools to pull annotations out of Kindle the other day and ran across Readwise again. Part of its functionality pulls highlights and annotations out of Kindle and then it has some UI that uses the idea of spaced repetition to have you regularly review what you’ve previously read and highlighted and presumably wanted to remember or use in the future.

Of course this is very similar to other spaced repetition/flash card applications like Mnemosyne, Anki, or language apps like Memrise and Duolingo among many others. I also seem to recall that Amazon once had some UI like this built into their Kindle Notebook, but I’m not finding it at the moment, but I know they’ve changed that UI sometime in the last two years–perhaps it’s gone?

The Pitch

Given the number of learners who are using Hypothes.is, wouldn’t it be a fantastic bit of functionality if Hypothes.is had a spaced repetition UI that would allow students to easily go back and review over their prior highlights and annotations?! Presumably this could be targeted for quizzes and tests, but honestly as a lifelong learner I very frequently love using tools like Timehop or even my website’s built-in “On this day” functionality to look back over bits and pieces of things I’ve done in the past, which also includes my annotations, since I’m keeping copies of them on my website as well.

Naturally such a UI should be able to search or sort by tag, date range, or even by source(s) so that a student could more easily wrangle a particular number of sources over which they wanted to review their material–particularly as over months, years, or decades one could build up a huge library of annotations. If, as a student, I was tagging my material by class course number subject area or something similar (like edu522, for example) I could then easily dump that into such a UI and be able to do spaced repetition studying for that subject area. Masters, Ph.D. students, and even the professoriate might appreciate it for occasional spaced repetition to be nudged or reminded of ideas they’d had in the past, but which may need rekindling to put into a thesis or potential future papers.

The more I think about this, the more I’d love to see it in Hypothes.is. If it’s not something the main team takes on, perhaps it could be an add-on for a group like Remi Kalir’s who have done some interesting work with the API to create Crowdlaaers

I’m planning to use import/export manually with tools like Anki to do some testing this coming weekend… I wonder what open sourced code may already exist that I could simply plug my Hypothes.is data into? Hmm…

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Over a year ago, I was working on Indigenous, the first app I've released in the App Store. It was a great experience but it originally started as a native share sheet extension. From there, more Micropub features were added and then as Microsub was announced, that was built in as well. Ultimately i...

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Following Virtually Connecting

Followed Virtually Connecting (http://virtuallyconnecting.org/)

logo for Virtually Connecting featuring what looks like the Earth, but the landmasses are faces looking at each other and the globe is wearing headphones

Enhancing the virtual event experience

The purpose of Virtually Connecting is to enliven virtual participation in academic conferences, widening access to a fuller conference experience for those who cannot be physically present at conferences. We are a community of volunteers and it is always free to participate.

Using emerging technologies, we connect onsite conference presenters and attendees with virtual participants in small groups. This allows virtual conference participants to meet and talk with conference presenters and attendees in what often feels like those great spontaneous hallway conversations, something not usually possible for a virtual experience. There is only room for 10 in each session but we record and, whenever possible, live stream, to allow additional virtual attendees to participate in the discussion by listening and asking questions via Twitter.

Bookmarked Paperpile: Modern reference and PDF management (paperpile.com)

Manage your research library right in your browser

  • Save time with a smart, intuitive interface
  • Access your PDFs from anywhere
  • Format citations within Google Docs

… and much more

I know I’ve run across this tool in the past, sometime just after it launched. I remember thinking it was interesting, but it was missing some things for me. Perhaps it’s worth another look to see how it has evolved and what it entails now?

In some sense it does a lot of what I’ve been using Calibre for and is not too dissimilar to Zotero and Mendeley, though obviously all with some slightly different offerings.

hat tip: Kimberly Hirsh for reminding me about it.

🔖 CROWDLAAERS

Bookmarked CROWDLAAERS (crowdlaaers.org)
Explore any URL featuring Hypothesis annotation. CROWDLAAERS provides learning analytics about active participants, temporal activity (active days), collaborative discourse (threads), and also Hypothesis tags. Groups of individual annotations may be sorted by date, contributor, annotation, tags, and level (or the position of an annotation reply in a thread). Select any annotation to read the full content within CROWDLAAERS or in context of the source document. Or explore how CROWDLAAERS has been applied to curated sets of online texts by selecting from Projects.

It’s not exactly an implementation of Webmention, but I was interested to find that there’s a tool from Hypothes.is that will show you (all?) the annotations (and replies) on your website.

Just visit https://jonudell.info/h/facet/ and then enter the appropriate domain name followed by /* as a wildcard to search.

Examples for:

Now wouldn’t it be cool if this were available in the main UI? Perhaps if there were a button for “Site notes” or highlights? This may be unwieldy for the New York Times, but could be reasonable and very useful for smaller personal and/or academic based websites.

The user interface for the side bar of Hypothesis with a "Site Notes" element added in red next to "Annotations" and "Page Notes"

Other than following the RSS feeds of specific people’s public highlights and annotations, is there an easier way of following people on Hypothes.is? Is there a social layer or reader side I’m missing?

Who should I be following? How can I discover interesting annotators besides besides slowly and organically? Who out there is using Hypothes.is in unique and interesting ways?

And of course, there’s also following feeds of interesting tags, but how can one find the largest and most interesting subsets? Many of the tags I’m interested in following are only being annotated and followed by me.

Is there a master list of public tags ranked in order of prevalence? Academic based tags? 

I feel like there’s far more interesting material being unearthed by this tool, just based on how I’m using it, but that the discovery portion is largely missing, or hidden away in the dark corners of Jon Udell’s web or only via API access.

I find myself wondering what’s at the bleeding edge that I’m not seeing (without following the GitHub repo on a regular basis).

 

Replied to a tweet by Kevin MarksKevin Marks (Twitter)

Says the kind man who once turned me onto a great bookmarklet that will scrape off that very cruft… http://known.kevinmarks.com/2017/day-7-to-amp-or-not-to-amp-100daysofindieweb