Bookmarked Digital Mappa | an open-source DH platform (Digital Mappa)
Collect and mark up digital images and texts, link them together, annotate them, invite friends to collaborate, publish with one click.
This looks like a cool little project. I wonder how well this might make for a platform for a Domain of One’s Own/IndieWeb for Education?

I came across it via

which makes it sound like an off-label use case for their application. But given the functionality, it looks like it would fun/useful for those in the digital humanities space and could be a cool tool in one’s DoOO workshop.

Does anyone else have experience with it?

whitney trettien on Twitter: “I’m excited to share a digital edition of Susanna Collet’s 17th-century commonplace book, held at @morganlibrary. @zoe_braccia & I made it using @digitalmappa. It features a full transcription/facsimile & a searchable library of Collet’s source texts. https://t.co/VSCMmBhMS6 https://t.co/fyrbwS9kk1” ()

Read Thread by whitney trettien (Twitter)

There are surprisingly few digital editions of commonplace books, especially given how the genre lends itself to digitization. What we’ve made isn’t perfect but we hope it helps others think through/with these types of books. More about that here: digitalbookhistory.com/colletscommonp… 

I’ve seen some people building digital commonplace books in real time, but I’m also curious to see more academics doing it and seeing what tools and platforms they’re using to do it.

Given the prevalence for these in text, I’d be particularly curious to see them being done as .txt or .md files and then imported into platforms like Obsidian, Roam Research, Org Mode, TiddlyWiki, et al for cross linking and backlinking.

I’ve seen some evidence of people doing some of this with copies of the bible or Frankenstein, but yet to see anyone digitize and cross link old notebooks or commonplace books.
Annotated on April 09, 2021 at 04:55PM

Bookmarked Introduction to Digital Humanities – UCLA | Winter 2021 by Miriam Posner (miriamposner.com)
In this class, you’ll learn about some of the new technologies that scholars are using for humanities research. We’ll look at the history and affordances of these tools, asking which possibilities each enables and which each excludes. We’ll also examine the history and current...
Spent some time browsing through the wealth of resources here. What a great site!

Greg McVerry will appreciate it and many of the curated resources which he may be able to remix and reuse.

Read Donatism (Wikipedia)
Donatism (Latin: Donatismus, Greek: Δονατισμός Donatismós) was a heresy leading to schism in the Church of Carthage from the fourth to the sixth centuries AD. Donatists argued that Christian clergy must be faultless for their ministry to be effective and their prayers and sacraments to be valid. Donatism had its roots in the long-established Christian community of the Roman Africa province (now Algeria and Tunisia) in the persecutions of Christians under Diocletian. Named after the Berber Christian bishop Donatus Magnus, Donatism flourished during the fourth and fifth centuries.
Read A Song of Scottish Publishing, 1671-1893 by Shawn (electricarchaeology.ca)
The Scottish National Library has made available a collection of chapbooks printed in Scotland, from 1671 – 1893, on their website here. That’s nearly 11 million words’ worth of material. The booklets cover an enormous variety of subjects. So, what do you do with it? Today, I decided to turn ...
This is more cool than truly useful, but I could see audioizations of data like this being used to surface and recognize patterns that might not otherwise be seen.
Bookmarked DH Awards 2019 Voting (Digital Humanities Awards)

Please vote for the following resources from 2019 in the DH Awards 2019. Have a look over the resources in each category and then fill out the form linked to at the bottom of the page in order to vote. For frequently asked questions please see http://dhawards.

🔖 The En-Gedi Scroll (2016) | Internet Archive

Bookmarked The En-Gedi Scroll (2016) (Internet Archive)

The data and virtual unwrapping results on the En-Gedi scroll. 

 
See the following papers for more information:
Seales, William Brent, et al. "From damage to discovery via virtual unwrapping: Reading the scroll from En-Gedi." Science advances 2.9 (2016): e1601247. (Web Article)
 
Segal, Michael, et al. "An Early Leviticus Scroll From En-Gedi: Preliminary Publication." Textus 26 (2016): 1-30. (PDF)

🔖 Digital Restoration Initiative

Bookmarked Digital Restoration Initiative (Digital Restoration Initiative)
The written word has been used throughout history to chronicle and contemplate the human experience, but many valuable texts are “lost” to us due to damage. The words of these documents and the knowledge they seek to impart are locked behind the destruction and decay wrought by time and injury, while the physical manuscripts themselves form an “invisible library” of sorts — closeted away on dark shelves, well-protected but prevented from proffering knowledge and encouraging inquiry. For more than 20 years, Dr. Seales has been working to create and use hi-tech, non-invasive tools to rescue these lost texts from the blink of oblivion and restore them to humanity. We call this innovative process “virtual unwrapping.”
h/t Dan Cohen newsletter #1

Followed Dan Cohen’s Newsletter feed for Humane Ingenuity

Followed Humane Ingenuity by Dan CohenDan Cohen (buttondown.email)

Dan Cohen

A newsletter by Dan Cohen on technology that helps rather than hurts human understanding, and human understanding that helps us create better technology.

His blog(s) are already cool enough, but Dan is also now putting out some additional (and different) great material by means of his newsletter. If you want great stuff, follow the librarians I always say.

👓 The Woodard projection | Jon Udell

Read The Woodard projection by Jon UdellJon Udell (Jon Udell)

In a memorable episode of The West Wing, visitors from the Cartographers for Social Justice upend CJ’s and Josh’s worldviews.

Cartographer: “The Peters projection.”

CJ: “What the hell is that?”

Cartographer: “It’s where you’ve been living this whole time.”

I’m having the same reaction to Colin Woodard’s 2011 book American Nations. He sees North America as three federations of nations. The federation we call the United States comprises nations he calls Yankeedom, New Netherland, The Midlands, Tidewater, Greater Appalachia, The Deep South, El Norte, The Far West, and The Left Coast.

Here’s his definition of a nation:

nation is a group of people who share — or believe they share — a common culture, ethnic origin, language, historical experience, artifacts, and symbols.”

I love the concept of this thesis! Ordering a copy of the book for myself.

I’ve lived in Greater Appalachia, The Deep South, Yankeedom, The Midlands, and the Left Coast and I’ve always unconsciously known many of these borders within culture. It’s often been difficult to describe the subtle cultural shifts and divides between many of these places to others. I can’t wait to read a book that delves into all of it depth.