👓 ‘I Want What My Male Colleague Has, and That Will Cost a Few Million Dollars’ | New York Times

Read ‘I Want What My Male Colleague Has, and That Will Cost a Few Million Dollars (nytimes.com)
Women at the Salk Institute say they faced a culture of marginalization and hostility. The numbers from other elite scientific institutions suggest they’re not alone.

From a statistical mechanics perspective, there isn’t much of a chance that women are all grouped at the bottom of the pack without their being systematically being drug down to that position.

The thing that goes unsung in a lot of these gender inequality articles is the assured dramatic loss to science as a result. If women were given equal footing, funding, and support what great discoveries would they have otherwise have found by this point? Assuredly the world would be far better off from those unknown discoveries.

It was quoted in the title of the article, but the full quote is even more damning.

“I know a lot of men who sincerely promote gender-equality opportunities for women, but all their efforts are devoted toward younger women,” Emerson says — because it’s less costly. “But I want what my male colleague has, and that will cost a few million dollars.”

👓 ‘Extraordinary’ 500-year-old library catalogue reveals books lost to time | The Guardian

Read 'Extraordinary' 500-year-old library catalogue reveals books lost to time by Alison Flood (the Guardian)
The Libro de los Epítomes was a catalogue for Hernando Colón’s 16th-century collection, which he intended to be the biggest in the world

👓 A Reader’s Guide to the Journalism Behind the Mueller Report | New York Times

Read A Reader’s Guide to the Journalism Behind the Mueller Report (New York Times)
If some of the revelations in Robert S. Mueller III’s redacted report sound familiar, it’s because many of them were previously published by The New York Times and other news outlets.

👓 How Barr and Trump Use a Russian Disinformation Tactic | New York Times

Read Opinion | How Barr and Trump Use a Russian Disinformation Tactic (New York Times)
They were able to define “collusion” to benefit themselves. Don’t let them twist meanings again with their “spying” investigation.

👓 The Mueller report redactions, explained in 4 charts | Vox

Read The Mueller report redactions, explained in 4 charts by Alvin Chang (Vox)
We can’t see behind the bars. But we can see where they are — and why they’re there.

👓 Why I chose Known over WordPress | Greg McVerry

Read Why I chose Known over WordPress by Greg McVerryGreg McVerry (Quick Thoughts)
Creative Growth 2013 Home show and fashion show (72) flickr photo by origamiguy1971 shared under a Creative Commons (BY) license Plurality stitches a beautiful quilt of complex choices, and each person adds their own unique spin on the  #IndieWeb. As long as you wrap yourself in the warmth of #...

👓 Facebook perfects the art of the news dump | CNN

Read Facebook perfects the art of the news dump (CNN)
On the Thursday before a major holiday weekend, and an hour before the much-anticipated Mueller report was released to the public, Facebook updated a month-old blog post titled "Keeping Passwords Secure" with a few lines of italicized text.

👓 A Technical and Cultural Assessment of the Mueller Report PDF | pdfa.org

Read A Technical and Cultural Assessment of the Mueller Report PDF (PDF Association)
Editor’s Note: Since this piece was first posted we’ve published an analysis of the Mueller Report’s text searchability.  What can we learn about the Mueller Report from the PDF file released by the Department of Justice (DoJ) on April 18, 2019? This article offers two things: a brief, high-level technical assessment of the document, and …

👓 Give Me Random or Give Me… | CogDog | Alan Levine

Read Give Me Random or Give Me... by Alan Levine (Not So Stupid WordPress Tricks)
The easiest magic in the box. Just by adding 6 characters to your WordPress web address, you get a link to goes to a random post on your site. Spin the wheel....
Read What you need to know about the Mueller report (cnn.com)

The Department of Justice released special counsel Robert Mueller's long awaited report earlier this morning.

The report — which only included "limited" redactions, according to Attorney General William Barr — detailed his investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 US election.

The bottom line: We learned a lot.

You can read the full report for yourself, or get caught up with these key takeaways:

  • Mueller was unable to conclude that “no criminal conduct occurred.” The investigation was also unable to clear President Trump on obstruction. The report states that the evidence obtained “about the President’s actions and intent presents difficult issues that prevent us from conclusively determining that no criminal conduct occurred.”
  • Why obstruction by Trump failed: Efforts by Trump to obstruct justice failed because others refused to "carry out orders," the report said.
  • Trump tried to remove Mueller: Trump called former White House lawyer Don McGahn at home and directed him to call the acting attorney general and say Mueller "had conflicts of interest and must be removed." McGahn refused.
  • What the Trump campaign knew: The special counsel’s investigation into possible collusion found that members of the Trump campaign knew they would benefit from Russia’s illegal actions to influence the election, but didn’t take criminal steps to help, the report said.
  • Why Mueller didn’t subpoena Trump: The special counsel believed it had the authority to subpoena President Trump — but decided against doing so because it would delay the investigation, according to the report. Prosecutors also believed they already had a substantial amount of evidence.
  • Sarah Sanders misled the media about the firing of the FBI director: The White House press secretary conceded in an interview with Mueller she made statements to the media that were not based in fact.
  • Trump dropped F-bomb after Mueller got the job: In May 2017, shortly after Trump learned from his then-Attorney General Jeff Sessions that Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein had appointed Mueller, Trump “slumped back in his chair and said, ‘Oh my God. This is terrible. This is the end of my Presidency. I'm f***ed.’”
  • Mueller said Trump's public acts can be considered obstruction: The special counsel wrote about how the President’s public comments can be considered as obstruction efforts because of his power.
  • Congress has the right to investigate: Mueller’s report laid out the case for why Congress is able to investigate and take action against Trump on obstruction of justice.
  • Trump asked campaign aides to find Clinton’s emails: After Trump publicly asked Russia to hack Hillary Clinton’s emails at a July 2016 press conference, he privately and repeatedly “asked individuals affiliated with his campaign to find the deleted Clinton emails,” the report said.
  • Mueller considered different possible collusion crimes: The special counsel looked at potential crimes outside of conspiracy as he investigated collusion —including crimes under campaign finance law and regarding individuals potentially acting as illegal foreign agents for the Russian government.
  • Mueller investigated rumored compromising tapes of Trump in Moscow: The special counsel examined whether Trump learned during the presidential campaign of the rumored existence of compromising tapes made of him years earlier when he visited Moscow.

👓 Fixing the financial dilemma at the heart of our broken tech industry | Ben Werdmüller

Bookmarked Fixing the financial dilemma at the heart of our broken tech industry by Ben WerdmüllerBen Werdmüller (Ben Werdmüller)

I was recently forwarded Jeffrey Zeldman's piece on A List ApartNothing Fails Like Success, on the impact of venture capital on startup business models. At the end, he questions whether the indieweb is a possible answer to the predicament we find ourselves in.

I feel uniquely positioned to answer, because I've been a venture capitalist (at mission-driven accelerator Matter Ventures) and have literally started an indieweb startup, Known. I've also bootstrapped a startup and worked at one that raised hundreds of millions of venture capital dollars.

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👓 Thousands of leaked Facebook documents show Mark Zuckerberg as ‘master of leverage’ in plan to trade user data | NBC News

Read Thousands of leaked Facebook documents show Mark Zuckerberg as ‘master of leverage’ in plan to trade user data (NBC News)
Facebook’s leaders seriously discussed selling access to user data — and privacy was an afterthought.

The story somehow just gets worse and worse and still they just apologize and continue on as usual… It’s shocking to see so many who raised ethical issues along the way are remaining silent now, ostensibly because they are still on the gravy train and are enriching themselves by staying silent.

👓 Sessions | WordCamp Greenville 2019

Read WordPress and the IndieWeb: Why You Should Own Your Voice (WordCamp 2019 Greenville, SC)
WordPress can be used to start a blog, make a site for a club, or power a business, large or small. WordPress can also be used as a way to document your life, and save important things for later. You can bridge WordPress to other parts of the web that you use to store all of your data in one place, without having to worry about an app, hardware maker, or social media site going out of business and taking all of your content with it. I considered myself an interloper into the IndieWeb movement, until I realized that the movement — just like the technology that powers it — is decentralized. My habit of copying data created on other sites, as well as creating a website for my lifelogging, is part of what this community is about. Come learn about how you can use WordPress to power and amplify your voice online, and reclaim the web from the walled gardens for the user!

👓 HTTP Frameworks Must Die | Medium | Eran Hammer

Read HTTP Frameworks Must Die by Eran Hammer (hueniverse)

Do us all a favor and stop creating new HTTP 1.x frameworks.

We don’t need more.

We have too many.

…and they are all old news — especially the new ones.

But if you absolutely have to, add some value to the conversation. Value other than one tiny aspect in which your framework is better than all the rest. Offer innovation that moves backend engineering forward in a non-trivial fashion. Write the next chapter, not the next paragraph.