Watched Lecture 19: Politics and Literature in Wales of The Celtic World by Jennifer Paxton from The Great Courses

Lecture 19: Politics and Literature in Wales
Unveil the turbulent story of English conquest in Wales with this insightful glimpse into Welsh history that includes the unfortunate influence of misplaced loyalty to family that cost the Welsh their sovereignty forever. Then, look at Welsh literature, particularly the wonderful but enigmatic myths of the Mabinogi and the witty poems of Dafydd ap Gwilym.

I appreciates that she shares a few of her favorite pieces of literature from the time to give a flavor of the culture. Some denser history here which could be an entire course in and of itself.

Read - Reading: Knowledge and Power in Prehistoric Societies: Orality, Memory, and the Transmission of Culture by Lynne Kelly (Cambridge University Press (May 19, 2015))
Chapter 2: Knowledge and Power in oral cultures
16% done; Finished Chapter 2

Oral traditions in the literature Public vs. restricted knowledge, knowledge trade, and formal teaching. We have generally done a poor job of untangling the vast knowledge indigenous people have.

Read 9 ways to fail a project in grad school and beyond by Dr Veronika CH (veronikach.com)
This post is a collaboration between myself, and a guest author who wishes to stay anonymous. They are a researcher and PhD candidate in neuroscience, based in Europe, and in the post they are referred to as Alice.  When people talk about failures, often rejections are the first things that come to mind. But what ... Read more 9 ways to fail a project in grad school and beyond

HARKing

It refers to the questionable research practice of hypothesizing after the results are known.
see: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HARKing  
Annotated on July 27, 2020 at 01:26PM

Read - Reading: Knowledge and Power in Prehistoric Societies: Orality, Memory, and the Transmission of Culture by Lynne Kelly (Cambridge University Press)
Chapter 1: Primary orality in the archaeological context
10% done; Finished Chapter 1
I appreciate the additional detail and references here. To an uninitiated audience it feels like she should have spent some time exploring the idea of mnemonic earlier, but I’m fine without it.
Read Brain Expert Jim Kwik on How to Take Notes You'll Remember by Minda Zetlin (Inc.com)
In a new Inc. webinar, Limitless author and memory expert Jim Kwik taught the audience a new way to take notes so as to get the most value out of them. You should start using it immediately -- I know I'm going to. It all begins with drawing a line down the center of the page.
C’mon Inc. this author and the article are too credulous, at best Kwik’s method is the slightest modification of Cornell Notes…
Read The Importance of URLs by Aaron PareckiAaron Parecki (Aaron Parecki)
Chirpify Acquires Urban Airship Preview
Last night around 11pm, I posted a link to the above story on Twitter, Facebook, and on my own site with the caption "Chirpify acquires Urban Airship".
The note contained a bit.ly link which redirected to a shrturl.co link which then displayed the article.
Thi...
Read IndieAuth 3.5.0 for WordPress Released by David ShanskeDavid Shanske (david.shanske.com)
Earlier in the week, I noted the release of IndieAuth 3.5.0, but I didn’t explain the major under the hood changes that occurred here in a post, which I need to do as at least one person is experiencing issues(probably necessitating a 3.5.1 as soon as I figure out why.) I also noted I forgot to de...
Read Micropub 2.2.0 for WordPress Released by David ShanskeDavid Shanske (david.shanske.com)
Micropub 2.2.0 has one major change in it. IndieAuth client code was removed. This code now lives in the IndieAuth plugin. This means that Micropub does not check for scopes. It uses the built-in WordPress capability system to determine if an action should be performed. The IndieAuth plugin limits c...
Read Carved stone balls (Wikipedia)
Carved stone balls are petrospheres dated from the late Neolithic to possibly as late as the Iron Age mainly found in Scotland, but also elsewhere in Britain and Ireland. They are usually round and rarely oval, and of fairly uniform size at around 2.75 inches or 7 cm across, with 3 to 160 protruding knobs on the surface. They range from having no ornamentation (apart from the knobs) to extensive and highly varied engraved patterns.[2] A wide range of theories have been produced to explain their use or significance, with none gaining very wide acceptance.
Read Discovering the secrets of Stonehenge (ScienceDaily)
A revolutionary new idea on the movement of big monument stones like those at Stonehenge has been put forward by an archaeology student. He discovered that many of the late Neolithic stone balls had a diameter within a millimeter of each other, which he felt indicated they would have been used together in some way rather than individually.
Read Andrew T Young BA (Hons) MA MIPG FSA Scot | University of Exeter (eprofile.exeter.ac.uk)
The Ground Stone Tools of Britain and Ireland: an Experimental Approach Andy's doctoral research explores the way ground stone tools are currently interpreted and examines the manufacture of a wide range of implements through experimental archaeology. His research contextualises the nature of ground stone tools with reference to the Neolithic and Bronze Age, analysing the trajectory of their development over time and the ways technological innovation may have driven certain morphological changes. He has developed a range of complimentary technical analyses which can be applied to experimental replication studies in order to better understand a wide range of tools. Interpretations are based on qualitative and quantitive data, whilst at the same time examine the ways a post-processual-linked phenomenological perspective might be a valid means of enquiry, with special emphasis on craft skills.