👓 Why Are So Many Longtime L.A. Bookstores Closing? | Hollywood Reporter

Read Why Are So Many Longtime L.A. Bookstores Closing? (The Hollywood Reporter)
Despite the recent shuttering of Circus of Books, Caravan Book Store and Samuel French, bookstore experts say the end for the city's brick-and-mortar stores isn't nigh: "There is a sea change happening, and it is noteworthy."

👓 CommentPress Core | GitHub

Read IFBook/commentpress-core (GitHub)
CommentPress Core is a WordPress plugin for creating and debating social texts in social contexts. It replaces all previous plugins (standalone and multisite) and includes the default theme.

I’m totally going to play around with this plugin!

👓 PRH Offers Direct Sales to Orphaned Bookstores

Read PRH Offers Direct Sales to Orphaned Bookstores (PublishersWeekly.com)
In response to Baker & Taylor closing its retail wholesale business, Penguin Random House has launched the Indies Express Program to transition B&T indie bookstore accounts to direct sales.

👓 Stanford community outraged at SU Press defunding, over 1,000 sign petitions | Stanford Daily

Read Stanford community outraged at SU Press defunding, over 1,000 sign petitions by Elise Miller (The Stanford Daily)
A flurry of critical letters, petitions and tweets came in the wake of the announcement of the University’s decision to discontinue funding for Stanford University Press, the primary printing ope...

This must be a big story in the ed space for me to have seen/read multiple stories and scrolled past several others…

And, yes, shame on Stanford.

👓 How a University Can Sell Its Soul: HASTAC's Stanford Origins and the University's Current Decision on Stanford University Press | HASTAC

Read How a University Can Sell Its Soul: HASTAC's Stanford Origins and the University's Current Decision on Stanford University Press by Cathy Davidson (HASTAC)
“Austerity” When You Are Wealthier Than Just About Anyone

👓 The Demands of Positive Celebrity Coverage | Jezebel

Read The Demands of Positive Celebrity Coverage (The Muse)
It’s been a rough week to be a star, and a rough week to be someone who listens to what stars have to say. At least, that’s what social media tells me. Some of the most famous people making music today—Ariana Grande, Cardi B, and Justin Bieber (as well as Lizzo, a darling of critics and her fans but not quite of superstar status... yet?)—have shared their thoughts online regarding the state of media in 2019. None of it advocates for a free press, much less even contends with that notion. The gist is that journalism should be service journalism that primarily serves the powerful and their images.

🎧 LifeWay Christian Closing Brick-And-Mortar Bookstores | NPR

Listened to LifeWay Christian Closing Brick-And-Mortar Bookstores from NPR

LifeWay Christian Stores plans to close all of its locations by end of the year and move all of the company's retailing online. Its bricks-and-mortar division has been losing money since 2013, and the company says it has tried just about everything to keep the business going, including overhauling several stores last summer and experimenting with features like coffee bars.

👓 Highly Profitable Medical Journal Says Open Access Publishing Has Failed. Right. | Forbes

Read Highly Profitable Medical Journal Says Open Access Publishing Has Failed. Right. by Steven Salzberg (Forbes)
The New England Journal of Medicine just published an editorial saying open access publishing isn't necessary, because they already make most of their content free. What are they so worried about? Yours truly breaks down a few of their bogus arguments.

You’d think that a highly respected medical journal would be great and providing some back up evidence right?!

Looking forward to brainstorming about  books at the next session at IndieWebCamp New Haven in about 30 minutes.

 

RSVPed Attending Los Angeles Times Festival of Books

Saturday, April 13th | 10 a.m. – 6 p.m.
Sunday, April 14th | 10 a.m. – 5 p.m.<

Since 1996, The Los Angeles Times Festival of Books has become a world renowned experience gathering writers, poets, artists, filmmakers, musicians and emerging storytellers like no other. Today over 150,000 people attend, making it the largest festival of its kind in the United States. Join us this year as we celebrate our literary culture and the Los Angeles Times’ passion for story.

👓 Monthly report: February 2019 | Jeremy Cherfas

Replied to Monthly report: February 2019 (jeremycherfas.net)

February was a pretty good month. Or maybe it's just that I have a lot more reminders of how good it was.

Our Daily Bread

Fear of rejection utterly justified; the agent says publishers want something less bitty, "a biography of a commodity, like Kurlansky's Cod". In sales terms, I'll bet that's what they want. But it is not at all what I want to write. So, back to making self-publishing a reality, ASAP.

Jeremy, if this is the response an agent and publishers have given you and you’re even remotely considering the self-publishing route, please do let me volunteer to help you in the endeavor. I have a tremendous amount of experience in the publishing area and also have a lot of overhead (including a massive block of ISBNs) in place to help you out along the way.

It’s the least I could do since I feel like I may be at least partially responsible for starting you down the primrose path of Our Daily Bread… I also suspect that what you’d like to write is going to be far more interesting and nourishing a project.

👓 ‘I can get any novel I want in 30 seconds’: can book piracy be stopped? | The Guardian

Read 'I can get any novel I want in 30 seconds': can book piracy be stopped? by Katy Guest (the Guardian)
As publishers struggle with ‘whack-a-mole’ websites, experts, authors and Guardian readers who illegally download books, assess the damage

👓 UC terminates subscriptions with world’s largest scientific publisher in push for open access to publicly funded research | University of California | Office of the President

Read UC terminates subscriptions with world’s largest scientific publisher in push for open access to publicly funded research (University of California | Office of the President)
As a leader in the global movement toward open access to publicly funded research, the University of California is taking a firm stand by deciding not to renew its subscriptions with Elsevier. Despite months of contract negotiations, Elsevier was unwilling to meet UC’s key goal: securing universal open access to UC research while containing the rapidly escalating costs associated with for-profit journals.

This is some crazy bad-ass news. Almost everyone I know in higher education tweeted this article out today.

Now if only we could get them to all go IndieWeb using a Domain of Their Own and practice academic samizdat